WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:08:55 2014 UTClccn-n000483610.00Dove la notte non finisce /0.251.00Bayt min ḥajar : mudhakkirāt murāsil ḥarb shahada waylāt al-ḥurūb fī Lubnān wa-al-ʻIrāq wa-Lībyā wa-Sūrīyah /27247271Anthony_Shadidn 000483615268916Šadīd, Anṭunīlccn-no2010075870Shah, Neil1976-nrtlccn-no2008178930Blackstone Audio, Inclccn-no2010033968Playaway Digital Audiolccn-no2006106285Findaway World, LLClccn-no2001076058Rain Media, Inclccn-no2003021487Assad, Bashar1965-viaf-291660080Gaviria, Marcelaproausnp-navai, ramitaNavai, Ramitarptlccn-no2009157034Quicksilver Medianp-dabbous, waelDabbous, WaeldrtShadid, AnthonyHistoryArtSocial historyLebanonMiddle EastFamiliesEmigration and immigration--Social aspectsHomeIraq War (2003-2011)IraqSocial aspectsPolitical scienceIslamic countriesIslam and politicsIslam and world politicsIslamIslamic fundamentalismDemocracy--Religious aspects--IslamPress coverageWomenChildrenHomesAssad, Bashar,SyriaUnited StatesInternational relationsBombingsArtists' booksIraq--BaghdadKorea (North)PakistanHuman beings--Effect of environment onHuman evolutionUnited States.--CongressCitizenshipCivilian war casualtiesAfghan War (2001-)Public opinionAfghanistanBattle casualtiesWar on Terrorism (2001-2009)196820122000200120022005200620072008200920112012201354282066306.0956HQ663.9ocn771943176201810ocn666239946book20120.21Shadid, AnthonyHouse of stone : a memoir of home, family, and a lost Middle EastHistory"In 2006, Shadid, an Arab-American raised in Oklahoma, was covering Israel's attack on Lebanon when he heard that an Israeli rocket had crashed into the house his great-grandfather built, his family's ancestral home. Not long after, Shadid (who had covered three wars in the Middle East) realized that he had lost his passion for a region that had lost its soul. He had seen too much violence and death; his career had destroyed his marriage. Seeking renewal, he set out to rebuild the house that held his family's past in the town they had helped settle long ago. Although the course of the reconstruction is complicated by craftsmen with too much personality, squabbles with his extended family, and Lebanon's political strife, Shadid is restored along with the house and finds that his understanding of the Middle East, which he had known chiefly in wartime, has been deepened by his immersion in smalltown life. Coming to terms with his family's emigrant experience and their town's history, the "homeless" Shadid finds home and comes to understand the emotions behind the turbulence of the Middle East. In a moving epilogue, Shadid describes returning to this house after a nearly disastrous week as a prisoner of war in Libya along with the first visit of his daughter. Combining the human interest of The Bookseller of Kabul and Three Cups of Tea with the light touch of an expert determined, first, to tell a story, Shadid tells the story of a reconstruction effort that would have sent Frances Mayes to a psychiatric hospital as he brings to life unforgettable characters who lives help explain not just the modern Middle East but the legacy of those who have survived generations of war. He flashes back to his family's loss of home, their suffering during their country's dark days, and their experiences as newcomers in Oklahoma. This is a book about what propels the Middle East's rage, loss of home, and what it must examine and re-find, the sense of shared community. Far surpassing the usual reporter's "tour of duty," books, House of Stone is more humane and compelling and will please students of the region, those whose families have emigrated from other nations, and all readers engaged by engrossing storytelling"--197211ocn057625868book20050.23Shadid, AnthonyNight draws near : Iraq's people in the shadow of America's warFrom the only journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting from Iraq, an account of ordinary people caught between the struggles of nations. The Washington Post's Shadid went to Iraq, neither embedded with soldiers nor briefed by politicians. Because he is fluent in Arabic, Shadid--an Arab American born and raised in Oklahoma--was able to disappear into the divided, dangerous worlds of Iraq. Day by day, as the American dream of freedom clashed with Arab notions of justice, he pieced together the human story of ordinary Iraqis weathering the terrible dislocations and tragedies of war. Through the lives of men and women, Sunnis and Shiites, American sympathizers and outraged young jihadists newly transformed into martyrs, Shadid shows us the journey of defiant, hopeful, resilient Iraq, and how Saddam's downfall paved the way not only for democracy but also for an Islamic reawakening and jihad.--From publisher description+-+175125053566615ocn044675991book20000.50Shadid, AnthonyLegacy of the prophet : despots, democrats, and the new politics of Islam"Legacy of the Prophet is a sweeping, first-person account of the transformation in the style and message of Islamic politics at the end of the twentieth century: a shift from militancy to democracy with vast implications for the West. Drawing on his years of reporting in more than a dozen countries of the Muslim world, Anthony Shadid charts the way in which the adolescence of yesterday's Islamic militants is yielding to the maturity of today's activists. Through interview, travelogue, and history, he chronicles that new generation, which is finding a more realistic and potentially more successful future through democratic politics. A crucial element of this change, and of Legacy of the Prophet, is his exploration of the failure of militant Islam in countries like Sudan and Iran. Legacy of the Prophet promises to redefine the debate over the future of political Islam."--BOOK JACKET+-+34228886353336ocn811247749file20120.12Shadid, AnthonyHouse of stone a memoir of home, family, and a lost Middle EastHistoryWhen Anthony Shadid--one of four New York Times reporters captured in Libya as the region erupted--was freed, he went home, not to Boston, Beirut, or Oklahoma, where he was raised by his Lebanese American family, but to an ancient estate built by his great-grandfather, a place filled with memories of a lost era when the Middle East was a world of grace, grandeur, and unexpected departures. For two years previous, Shadid had worked to reconstruct the house and restore his spirit after both had weathered war. Now the author of the award-winning Night Draws Near tells the story of the house's re-creation, revealing its mysteries and recovering the lives that have passed through it. Shadid juxtaposes past and present as he traces the house's renewal along with his family's flight from Lebanon and resettlement in America. House of Stone is an unforgettable memoir of the world's most volatile landscape and the universal yearning for home682ocn061519856rcrd20050.15Shadid, AnthonyNight draws near Iraq's people in the shadow of America's warAn Arab-American journalist looks at the Iraq War from the perspective of ordinary Iraqi citizens confronted by the dislocations, hardships, tragedies, and harsh realities of the conflict+-+8332248406301ocn771943176visu20110.29FrontlineReporter Ramita Navai goes undercover for a rare look at the uprising from inside Syria; plus a profile of the dictator who has managed to hold on longer than any amidst the Arab unrest: Syrian president Bashar al-Assad112ocn799292105book2006Shadid, AnthonyDove la notte non finisce71ocn799049917book20120.47Szujewska, Laurie JustineThe Iraqi booksellerArt"Created as a follow-up to a broadside I created for the Mutannabbi Street Broadside Project in 2007. Both were inspired by an article written by Anthony Shadid for the Washington Post Foreign Service on March 12, 2007, entitled "The Bookseller's Story Ending Much Too Soon."' about his friendship with the bookseller, Mohammed Hayawi. -- artist's website61ocn301757823rcrd20080.81Ehrlich, Paul RThe dominant animal A conversation with Anthony Shadid ; The Lee Hamilton commentaries : PakistanHistoryCommentary #330 : "Title: Pakistan. Why do U.S. security experts say Pakistan in the most dangerous country in the world? Former Congressman Lee Hamilton discusses the myriad challenges facing Pakistan and how the United States might respond to them.'"--Track sheet61ocn314769557rcrd20070.81Coleman, Mary DeLorsePathways to citizenship A conversation with Anthony Shadid ; The Lee Hamilton commentaries : the path to good citizenship ; The Lee Hamilton commentaries : staying the course in North KoreaProgram #765: "Title: Pathways to citizenship. For Professor Mary Delorse Coleman, the question of exits from poverty is one of the most crucial public policy issues for this country and many others. Public policies which hinder the ability of individuals to 'exit poverty' are nothing short of a "public insult," whether their motivation is indifference, ignorance or hostility. In this conversation she draws compelling connections between the poor in Eastern Europe, Southern Africa and Sunflower County Mississippi"--Track sheet62ocn826294607book20120.31Shadid, AnthonyShi tou zhi wu : jia yuan , jia ting yu xiao shi zhong dong de hui yiHistory51ocn840447621book20120.47Xia di deShi tou zhi wu : jia yuan . jia zu yu xiao shi zhong dong de hui yiHistory21ocn851583864book20121.00Shadid, AnthonyBayt min ḥajar : mudhakkirāt murāsil ḥarb shahada waylāt al-ḥurūb fī Lubnān wa-al-ʻIrāq wa-Lībyā wa-SūrīyahHistory22ocn842394318book20090.56Matar, RaniaOrdinary livesRania Matar photographs the ordinary activity of life in a culture often misunderstood in the West, at a time of social and political conflict. -publisher's description+-+328572840611ocn819599454book2012Shadid, AnthonyLa casa di pietra : memorie di una casa, una famiglia e un Medio Oriente perduto11ocn860750586book2012Shadid, AnthonyBaytun min ḥajar : mudhakkarāt murāsil ḥarb shahida waylāt al-ḥurūb fī Lubnān wa al-ʻIrāq wa Lībyā wa SūryāhDen libanesiske-amerikanske journalist Anthony Shadid beskriver konflikten i Mellemøsten og fletter beskrivelsen sammen med sin egen og sin families historie11ocn822953573book20020.47Shadid, AnthonyVictims of circumstance11ocn717402993art2002War without borders : [dossier]11ocn851377457book20130.10House of stoneHistory11ocn788141975visu2008Loss and nostalgia in the Middle East : a foreign correspondent's reflections on conflict and change in the regionHistory2312ocn778802946rcrd20120.12Shadid, AnthonyHouse of stone a memoir of home, family, and a lost Middle EastHistoryWhen Anthony Shadid--one of four New York Times reporters captured in Libya as the region erupted--was freed, he went home, not to Boston, Beirut, or Oklahoma, where he was raised by his Lebanese American family, but to an ancient estate built by his great-grandfather, a place filled with memories of a lost era when the Middle East was a world of grace, grandeur, and unexpected departures. For two years previous, Shadid had worked to reconstruct the house and restore his spirit after both had weathered war. Now the author of the award-winning Night Draws Near tells the story of the house's re-creation, revealing its mysteries and recovering the lives that have passed through it. Shadid juxtaposes past and present as he traces the house's renewal along with his family's flight from Lebanon and resettlement in America. House of Stone is an unforgettable memoir of the world's most volatile landscape and the universal yearning for home592ocn805273278book20120.21Shadid, AnthonyHouse of stone : a memoir of home, family, and a lost Middle EastHistoryIn 2006, Shadid, an Arab-American raised in Oklahoma, was covering Israel's attack on Lebanon when he heard that an Israeli rocket had crashed into the house his great-grandfather built, his family's ancestral home. Not long after, Shadid (who had covered three wars in the Middle East) realized that he had lost his passion for a region that had lost its soul. He had seen too much violence and death; his career had destroyed his marriage. Seeking renewal, he set out to rebuild the house that held his family's past in the town they had helped settle long ago. Although the course of the reconstruction is complicated by craftsmen with too much personality, squabbles with his extended family, and Lebanon's political strife, Shadid is restored along with the house and finds that his understanding of the Middle East, which he had known chiefly in wartime, has been deepened by his immersion in smalltown life. Coming to terms with his family's emigrant experience and their town's history, the "homeless" Shadid finds home and comes to understand the emotions behind the turbulence of the Middle East. In a moving epilogue, Shadid describes returning to this house after a nearly disastrous week as a prisoner of war in Libya along with the first visit of his daughter. Shadid brings to life unforgettable characters who lives help explain not just the modern Middle East but the legacy of those who have survived generations of war. He flashes back to his family's loss of home, their suffering during their country's dark days, and their experiences as newcomers in Oklahoma. This is a book about what propels the Middle East's rage, loss of home, and what it must examine and re-find, the sense of shared community+-+1751250535+-+1751250535Fri Mar 21 15:32:28 EDT 2014batch20217