WorldCat Identities

Marlowe, David H.

Overview
Works: 18 works in 34 publications in 1 language and 475 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by David H Marlowe
Psychological and psychosocial consequences of combat and deployment : with special emphasis on the Gulf War by David H Marlowe( Book )

8 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 271 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research in the neurosciences has demonstrated that the boundary between the external world (its events, pressures, concerns and stress) and the brain and body has been broken. The concept of anything being all in the mind is scientifically and intellectually dead. While some data remain ambiguous and direct causal effect cannot be given to stress per se, the overall patterns of research findings demonstrate that stress is a contributing factor to many illnesses, including somatic and psychological symptoms. Therefore, very real consequences attend those who experience prolonged subacute chronic stress, which characterized in the Gulf deployment, combat, and return home. It is feasible that the effects of these stresses made some soldiers more vulnerable to environmental pathogens, both in the theater and at home, than they would otherwise have been. The symptoms of such insults, nested in sociocultural beliefs about illness and the Gulf, might well have amplified deleterious somatic consequences. Like many illnesses, those pertaining to service in the Gulf have been culturally shaped. An illness narrative describes the causes of the illness as perceived by the patient and is most often constructed out of the assertions, metaphors, folklore, causal attributions, and adduced causes common in the patient's culture. Other agents of a presumed authorities, the Internet, and support and self-help groups. Such illness narratives can become an important factor in shaping both the nature and interpretation of symptoms by the patient. A cogent, widespread, and widely shared illness narrative is certainly a characteristic development of Gulf War illness. The threads of combat and deployment stress and the side spectrum of possible responses, as demonstrated throughout history, weaves into the matrix of possible illness causation. It is also possible that a subset of the population is (in some ways, not yet understood) vulnerable and predisposed to injurious responses to the multiple stressors experienced in deployment and combat. This book argues that, to be most helpful to veterans, we must deal with this issue of complexity and not simply focus on a hypothecated or hoped for singular cause of Gulf War illness
The mind test by Rita Aero( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examining possible causes of Gulf War illness : RAND policy investigations and reviews of the scientific literature( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shortly after the 1991 Persian Gulf War ended, veterans of that conflict began reporting a variety of physical and psychological symptoms, some of which remain unexplained. To track this issue, the Secretary of Defense in 1996 designated that a Special Assistant for Gulf War Illnesses (OSAGWI) oversee all Department of Defense efforts related to these conditions. This research brief outlines assistance that RAND provided to the OSAGWI in investigating the health effects of eight areas of possible causes of illness: infectious diseases, pyridostigmine bromide, immunizations, wartime stress, chemical and biological warfare agents, oil well fires, depleted uranium, and pesticides
New manning system field evaluation by David H Marlowe( Book )

7 editions published between 1985 and 1986 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the fourth quarterly report of WRAIR research evaluating the human dimensions of the Unit Manning System (UMS) and the light infantry division concept. This report concentrates almost exclusively on battalion rotation and unit replacement issues pertaining to the UMS. Chapter 1 provides the background for this research, and sketches the six related but distinct areas of research activity in the WRAIR effort. Chapters 2 through 6 provide detailed analyses and recommendations. The COHORT concept works. Both survey and interview data at two points in time continue to show small but consistent differences in horizontal cohesion in favor of COHORT units. This finding is not remarkable; it simply confirms what all experienced commanders already know: the longer soldiers train together the better they know one another, and the better they perform
Unit manning system field evaluation( Book )

4 editions published between 1986 and 1987 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes the development of the 7th Infantry Division (Light) at Fort Ord, Calif. within the concept of the unit manning system or COHORT
Cohesion, anticipated breakdown, and endurance in battle : considerations for severe and high intensity combat by David H Marlowe( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Stress and arousal symptoms in individuals and groups : Persian Gulf War symptoms as paradigm : final report( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A review of the scientific literature as it pertains to Gulf War illnesses, with special emphasis on the Gulf War by David H Marlowe( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Research in the neurosciences has demonstrated that the boundary between the external world (its events, pressures, concerns and stress) and the brain and body has been broken. The concept of anything being all in the mind is scientifically and intellectually dead. While some data remain ambiguous and direct causal effect cannot be given to stress per se, the overall patterns of research findings demonstrate that stress is a contributing factor to many illnesses, including somatic and psychological symptoms. Therefore, very real consequences attend those who experience prolonged subacute chronic stress, which characterized in the Gulf deployment, combat, and return home. It is feasible that the effects of these stresses made some soldiers more vulnerable to environmental pathogens, both in the theater and at home, than they would otherwise have been. The symptoms of such insults, nested in sociocultural beliefs about illness and the Gulf, might well have amplified deleterious somatic consequences. Like many illnesses, those pertaining to service in the Gulf have been culturally shaped. An illness narrative describes the causes of the illness as perceived by the patient and is most often constructed out of the assertions, metaphors, folklore, causal attributions, and adduced causes common in the patient{u2019}s culture. Other agents of a presumed authorities, the Internet, and support and self-help groups. Such illness narratives can become an important factor in shaping both the nature and interpretation of symptoms by the patient. A cogent, widespread, and widely shared illness narrative is certainly a characteristic development of Gulf War illness. The threads of combat and deployment stress and the side spectrum of possible responses, as demonstrated throughout history, weaves into the matrix of possible illness causation. It is also possible that a subset of the population is (in some ways, not yet understood) vulnerable and predisposed to injurious responses to the multiple stressors experienced in deployment and combat. This book argues that, to be most helpful to veterans, we must deal with this issue of complexity and not simply focus on a hypothecated or hoped for singular cause of Gulf War illness. --Publisher description
Stress and Arousal Symptoms in Individuals and Groups - Persian Gulf War Symptoms as a Paradigm( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This volume is a final report for the grant, Stress and Arousal Symptoms in Individuals and Groups - The Persian Gulf War Symptoms as a Paradigm. This report makes a series of recommendations, some general, and some quasi-specific for future patterns of research into the somatic and other consequences of combat stress, deployment stress and other stresses of military life. It is our conclusion that the time has come to move away from the general and only partially meaningful definitions of "stress" to more tightly operational and measurable ones. We also believe that the time has come to initiate research with techniques that will stand the tests of measuring short, mid and long term outcomes replacing present modes of intervention and treatment, which have often been rooted in unproved concepts and psychiatric folklore. Much of the earlier research into the somatic consequences of stress and indeed into medicine as a whole, was correlational in nature. The value of correlational research and findings remains unchallenged as an indicator and guide to general areas in which causality can be discovered and effective treatment devised. Its utility, however, is limited when it comes to specific preventive or therapeutic interventions. Because correlational research was directed at single levels of the biological hierarchy and unitary causal agents, it has been central to the "medical model" for some generations. The implicit radical reductionism underlying this model has been the source of the greatest success of medicine when dealing with both the elucidation of cause and the treatment of diseases traceable to single pathogens or toxins. Yet even when the single pathogen of a disease is uncovered, the issue of prevention often requires the integration of multiple factors from the molecular to the socio-cultural. Cholera is an apt illustration of the problem of the integration of multiple factors into the treatment and prevention of an illness
In the mosaic : cognitive bases of S'Kaw Karen-North Thai relationships by David H Marlowe( Book )

1 edition published in 1971 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Notes on a mountain flower : thoughts on the epidemiology of the cultivation and use of Papaver somniferum in certain hill areas of North Thailand by David H Marlowe( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Paratroopers as Peacekeepers: Deployment and Return( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Upland-lowland relationship : the case of the S'kaw Karen of central upland western Chiang Mai Hill and valley populations in by Peter Kunstadter( Book )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Proceedings : the issue of terror as an experience, a problem and a tool( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Human endurance on the nuclear battlefield : thoughts on prediction and prophecy by David H Marlowe( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Galjaal Barsana of central Somalia; a study of the relationship between socio-political change, inter and intra group conflict and political and social behavior by David H Marlowe( Book )

1 edition published in 1963 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Impact of deployment separation on Army families( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Brief family separations resulting from military training exercises are a common phenomenon in Army communities. Extended separations are less common and therefore little is known about the effects of these separations on Army family members. The impact of a six-month battalion deployment on the families of service members was studied. A series post-sponsored actions to reduce the detrimental effects of the deployment are described: family briefings before the deployment, strong support from the rear detachment and other post resources during the deployment, and an active wives' network
Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm: A Summary Report( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

When the United States forces deployed to the Persian Gulf in August, 1990, many senior military leaders were appropriately concerned about the psychological stress that would be created by this high-threat deployment to a harsh operational environment. To learn more about the stress of th deployment and how soldiers were adapting, the Department of Military Psychiatry, Water Reed Army Institute of Research, took a research team to Saudi Arabia to study the deployment first hand. The team conducted an initial assessment of stress and adaptation in the Persian Gulf theater from 22 September through 6 October 1990. A second team returned for additional interviews and surveys of soldiers and their leaders from 11 November through 13 December 1990. The objective of this research program was to determine the psychological consequences of deployment, combat, and redeployment to home station for soldiers and their families. Together, these visits resulted in interviews with approximately 1,000 soldiers and their leaders, and the collection of more than 2800 self-administered questionnaires from soldiers in these same combat and combat support units
 
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Psychological and psychosocial consequences of combat and deployment : with special emphasis on the Gulf War A review of the scientific literature as it pertains to Gulf War illnesses, with special emphasis on the Gulf War
Covers
The mind testA review of the scientific literature as it pertains to Gulf War illnesses, with special emphasis on the Gulf War
Languages
English (34)