WorldCat Identities

Gospodarowicz, M. K. (Mary K.)

Overview
Works: 16 works in 77 publications in 6 languages and 1,068 library holdings
Genres: Classification 
Roles: Editor, Publishing director, Author, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by M. K Gospodarowicz
TNM classification of malignant tumours by International Union against Cancer( )

38 editions published between 2009 and 2017 in English and French and held by 833 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Visit www.wileyanduicc.com for more information about the International Journal of Cancer and our other UICC book titles
Prognostic factors in cancer by Paul Hermanek( Book )

16 editions published between 1995 and 2006 in English and held by 208 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examines the prognostic factors associated with each cancer site and provides insight into potential treatments and therapies. The text is an extension of the International Union Against Cancer's (UICC) seminal work, the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, and integrates the current focus on prognostics in cancer. This Third Edition reflects the advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment planning made in recent years. The first part of the book offers a complete update on the science of cancer prognosis while the second part contains site-specific chapters that provide evidence-based guidelines for treatment. Each clinical chapter summarizes the significance of the great variety of tumour-related, patient-related, and environment-related factors that play a role in the prognosis of cancer, all backed with a grid for quick reference
TNM klasyfikacja nowotworów złośliwych( Book )

6 editions published between 2010 and 2017 in Polish and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

TNM akusei shuyo no bunrui : Nihongoban by International Union against Cancer( Book )

4 editions published between 2010 and 2017 in Japanese and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book is a Japanese translation of the third edition of "TNM classification of malignant tumours," a cancer staging system that describes the extent of a person's cancer
TNM : classificazione dei tumori maligni by International Union against Cancer( Book )

2 editions published between 2010 and 2017 in Italian and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prognostic Factors in Cancer, 3rd Edition by M. K Gospodarowicz( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Malign tümörlerde TNM sınıflaması( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in Turkish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Costs, affordability, and feasibility of an essential package of cancer control interventions in low-income and middle-income countries: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Investments in cancer control—prevention, detection, diagnosis, surgery, other treatment, and palliative care—are increasingly needed in low-income and particularly in middle-income countries, where most of the world's cancer deaths occur without treatment or palliation. To help countries expand locally appropriate services, Cancer (the third volume of nine in Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition) developed an essential package of potentially cost-effective measures for countries to consider and adapt. Interventions included in the package are: prevention of tobacco-related cancer and virus-related liver and cervical cancers; diagnosis and treatment of early breast cancer, cervical cancer, and selected childhood cancers; and widespread availability of palliative care, including opioids. These interventions would cost an additional US$20 billion per year worldwide, constituting 3% of total public spending on health in low-income and middle-income countries. With implementation of an appropriately tailored package, most countries could substantially reduce suffering and premature death from cancer before 2030, with even greater improvements in later decades
The TNM classification of malignant tumours—towards common understanding and reasonable expectations( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Clinical Features, Management, and Prognosis of an International Series of 161 Patients With Limited‐Stage Diffuse Large B‐Cell Lymphoma of the Bone (the IELSG‐14 Study)( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Learning Objectives: Compare outcomes in patients with diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma of the bone treated with different modalities. Compare relapse rates and relapse sites in patients with diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma of the bone treated with different modalities. Abstract : Introduction: The clinical features, management, and prognosis of stage I–II diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma of the bone (PB‐DLBCL) included in an international database of 499 lymphoma patients with skeletal involvement were reviewed. Methods: HIV‐negative patients ( n = 161) with diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma of the bone (PB‐DLBCL) after complete staging workup were considered. The primary objective of this study was to identify the most effective treatment modality; the secondary objectives were to define the contribution of irradiation fields and doses and the pattern of relapse. Results: Median age was 55 years (range, 18–99 years), with a male/female ratio of 1:2; 141 (87%) patients had stage I, 14 (9%) had B symptoms, 37 (23%) had bulky lesion, 54 (33%) showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase serum levels, and 25 (15%) had fracture. Thirteen (8%) patients received chemotherapy alone, 23 (14%) received radiotherapy alone, and 125 (78%) received both treatments. The response to the first‐line treatment was complete in 131 of 152 assessed patients (complete response rate, 86%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 81%–91%) and partial in 7, with an overall response rate of 91% (95% CI, 87%–95%). At a median follow‐up of 54 months (range, 3–218), 107 (67%) patients remained relapse‐free, with a 5‐year progression‐free survival of 68% (SE: 4). Four (2.5%) patients had meningeal relapse; 119 patients were alive (113 disease‐free), with a 5‐year overall survival of 75% (SE: 4). Patients managed with primary chemotherapy, whether followed by radiotherapy or not, had a significantly better outcome than patients treated with primary radiotherapy, whether followed by chemotherapy or not. The addition of consolidative radiotherapy after primary chemotherapy was not associated with improved outcome; doses >36 Gy and the irradiation of the whole affected bone were not associated with better outcome. Conclusion: Patients with PB‐DLBCL exhibit a favorable prognosis when treated with primary anthracycline‐based chemotherapy whether followed by radiotherapy or not. In patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, the use of larger radiation fields and doses is not associated with better outcome. Central nervous system dissemination is a rare event in PB‐DLBCL patients. Abstract : The authors reviewed the clinical features, management, and prognosis of 161 patients with stage I–II diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma of the bone. Patients managed with primary chemotherapy had a significantly better outcome than patients treated with primary radiotherapy. The addition of consolidative radiotherapy after primary chemotherapy was not associated with improved outcome
Paediatric cancer stage in population-based cancer registries: the Toronto consensus principles and guidelines( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Population-based cancer registries generate estimates of incidence and survival that are essential for cancer surveillance, research, and control strategies. Although data on cancer stage allow meaningful assessments of changes in cancer incidence and outcomes, stage is not recorded by most population-based cancer registries. The main method of staging adult cancers is the TNM classification. The criteria for staging paediatric cancers, however, vary by diagnosis, have evolved over time, and sometimes vary by cooperative trial group. Consistency in the collection of staging data has therefore been challenging for population-based cancer registries. We assembled key experts and stakeholders (oncologists, cancer registrars, epidemiologists) and used a modified Delphi approach to establish principles for paediatric cancer stage collection. In this Review, we make recommendations on which staging systems should be adopted by population-based cancer registries for the major childhood cancers, including adaptations for low-income countries. Wide adoption of these guidelines in registries will ease international comparative incidence and outcome studies
In Reply( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : The authors thank Hoppe et al. for their interest in the study of patients with limited‐stage diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma of the bone (PB‐DLBCL). There is agreement that patients with PB‐DLBCL should be managed with anthracycline‐based chemotherapy and, if local practice includes it, radiotherapy and that treatment decisions should be based on patient characteristics, lymphoma extension, anatomical site, and conventional risk factors
Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Innovative technology in radiation medicine : 2002 annual scientific meeting ; October 22-27, 2002, Toronto, Canada( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Expanding global access to radiotherapy( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015–35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015–35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries—a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015–35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015–35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even greater total benefit of $365·4 billion ($12·8 billion in low-income countries, $67·7 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $284·7 billion in upper-middle-income countries). The returns, by the human-capital approach, are projected to be less with the nominal cost model, amounting to $16·9 billion in 2015–35 (–$14·9 billion in low-income countries; –$18·7 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $50·5 billion in upper-middle-income countries). The returns with the efficiency model were projected to be greater, however, amounting to $104·2 billion (–$2·4 billion in low-income countries, $10·7 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $95·9 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Our results provide compelling evidence that investment in radiotherapy not only enables treatment of large numbers of cancer cases to save lives, but also brings positive economic benefits
 
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Audience level: 0.60 (from 0.25 for Malign tü ... to 0.97 for TNM klasyf ...)

TNM classification of malignant tumours
Covers
Prognostic factors in cancerPrognostic Factors in Cancer, 3rd Edition
Alternative Names
Gospodaroviča, M.

Gospodarowicz, M. K.

Gospodarowicz, Mary

Gospodarowicz, Mary 1948-

Gospodarowicz, Mary K.

Gospodarowicz, Mary K., 1948-

Languages