WorldCat Identities

Guralnick, Robert M. 1950-

Overview
Works: 32 works in 70 publications in 1 language and 715 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Robert M Guralnick
 
Most widely held works by Robert M Guralnick
Symmetric and alternating groups as monodromy groups of Riemann surfaces I : generic covers and covers with many branch points by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

13 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 265 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The authors consider indecomposable degree $n$ covers of Riemann surfaces with monodromy group an alternating or symmetric group of degree $d$. They show that if the cover has five or more branch points then the genus grows rapidly with $n$ unless either $d = n$ or the curves have genus zero, there are precisely five branch points and $n =d(d-1)/2$. Similarly, if there is a totally ramified point, then without restriction on the number of branch points the genus grows rapidly with $n$ unless either $d=n$ or the curves have genus zero and $n=d(d-1)/2$. One consequence of these results is that if $f:X \rightarrow \mathbb{P} 1$ is indecomposable of degree $n$ with $X$ the generic Riemann surface of genus $g \ge 4$, then the monodromy group is $S_n$ or $A_n$ (and both can occur for $n$ sufficiently large). The authors also show if that if $f(x)$ is an indecomposable rational function of degree $n$ branched at $9$ or more points, then its monodromy group is $A_n$ or $S_n$. Finally, they answer a question of Elkies by showing that the curve parameterizing extensions of a number field given by an irreducible trinomial with Galois group $H$ has large genus unless $H=A_n$ or $S_n$ or $n$ is very small
The rational function analogue of a question of Schur and exceptionality of permutation representations by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

12 editions published between 1999 and 2003 in English and held by 263 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Finite Simple Groups : Thirty Years of the Atlas and Beyond : international conference, Finite Simple Groups: Thirty Years of the Atlas and Beyond, Celebrating the Atlases and Honoring John Conway, November 2-5, 2015, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ by Manjul Bhargava( Book )

10 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A mathematics conference partially based on Atlas of finite groups, by John H. Conway, et al. (Oxford University Press, 1985)
Computational linear algebra in algebraic and related problems( Book )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Symmetric and alternating groups as monodromy groups of Riemann surfaces by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Classification of 2F-modules, I by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Classification of 2F-modules, II by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The rational function analogue of a question of Schur and exceptionality of permutation representations by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Special issue celebrating the 80th birthday of Robert Steinberg( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Building data into knowledge: Identifying challenges and their solutions in biodiversity informatics by Andrew William Hill( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biologists are in a race to document biodiversity in the face of ailing ecosystems and species decline. The drive to create knowledge to support effective documentation, measurement, and conservation of biodiversity has led the community to quickly research and develop methods to organize and connect biodiversity data across providers and throughout the world. Biodiversity data came online through distributed and disconnected databases but through time has been shaped into a biodiversity network that now represents nearly 500 million biodiversity records. The ability to access these data has brought exciting new research and new challenges. In this thesis I discuss my work to solve some of those challenges and build innovative approaches and tools for biodiversity informatics. I start by documenting tools that help improve the quality and fitness for use of data. Then I present two tools for visualizing and analyzing data in a phylogenetic and conservation context. More importantly, I discuss how designing these tools to operate within a greater knowledge creation framework can make the work of documenting patterns and processes in biodiversity faster and more resilient to future changes and improved information. At the heart of that discussion is the idea that the outputs of the tools themselves should be published and directly linked back to the original data and forward to any future analyses. The outputs should also document all models, parameters, and heuristics used do arrive at the reported outcome. In this way, both the data and our research of that data can be woven into a connected fabric of knowledge and information that links biodiversity and the digital data stored in our databases. Finally, I discuss the possibility we have for expanding our biodiversity data and improving the research we can do with it through the use of citizen science. The data available today is still deficient. Natural history collections hold a wealth of data that has not yet been digitized, but as a community we lack the resources to unlock that data quickly without a novel solution. Citizen science offers us the ability to quickly generate historical biodiversity data from natural history collections. We present a novel platform for engaging citizen scientists and developing a shared, community driven, platform to harness the potential of citizen science
Climatic and habitat drivers of American pika (Ochotona princeps) occupancy and population density dynamics in the Southern Rocky Mountain region by Liesl Peterson Erb( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Climate change is affecting ecosystems worldwide. Among those ecological communities most affected are those inhabiting alpine habitats. These communities have evolved key adaptations to thrive in cold, wet environments. As temperatures warm and precipitation patterns become more variable due to global climate change, many alpine species are expected to be impacted. This dissertation research focuses on the American pika, a small lagomorph inhabiting broken rock slopes in the mountains and high plateaus of western North America. Population declines in the Great Basin region at the end of the 20th Century caused concern for populations elsewhere in the species range. The goal of this dissertation work was to document pika occupancy and density throughout the Southern Rocky Mountain region. Occupancy and density trends were modeled using potential climate- and habitat-based predictors known to impact pikas elsewhere in the species' range. Survey sites were selected from among hundreds of locations known to be occupied by pikas prior to 1980. In 2008, modeling of the resurvey results from 69 of these sites indicated that mean annual precipitation plays an important role in maintaining pika populations in this region. Further surveys of 19 of these sites in 2009-2011 showed a shift toward mean summer temperature and forage quality as the top predictors of occupancy, though sites lacking pikas also remained drier than those with pikas throughout this survey period. Pika occupancy in this region was relatively high, with Southern Rockies occupancy rates ranging from 74% to 94%. Among the extant populations, variability in population densities were best explained by patch area and vegetation quality: the highest density populations were reported in regions with small patches of talus, high forb diversity, and low graminoid to forb ratios. These results suggest that intraspecific competition for food resources strongly influences pika density. As climate change continues, vegetation quality is expected to decline in pika habitats. Given this species' reliance on cool, wet climates with high forb content, continued changes toward drier, hotter, and more graminoid-dominant habitats are likely to lead to declines in both pika densities and occupancy throughout the Southern Rockies and the western United States
Landscape and anthropogenic effects on mammal occupancy in the Appalachian Trail corridor by Peter Lowell Erb( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Anthropogenic and landscape effects on wildlife are typically assessed at the local or patch level, but such effects are often difficult to extrapolate to larger spatial extents. Studies that examine broad-extent effects of anthropogenic disturbances, fragmentation and habitat loss on mammal occupancy are uncommon and yet much-needed. Macro-level occupancy studies are one way to assess anthropogenic and landscape factors that vary and interact over different geographic extents. Here we assess anthropogenic and landscape effects on occupancy and distribution for several mammal species within the Appalachian Trail (AT), a forest corridor that extends across a broad section of the eastern United States. Utilizing camera traps and a large volunteer network of citizen scientists, we were able to sample 447 sites along a 1024 km section of the AT. To assess anthropogenic influences on mammal occupancy we investigated the effects of available habitat, hunting, recreation, and roads on eight mammal species. Landscape effects were measured by investigating the influence of available habitat, patch area, isolation, edge and connectivity on five carnivore species. Occupancy modeling revealed that available habitat was among the top predictors of occupancy for nearly all mammal species
The Museum of Paleontology University of California, Berkeley by David Polly( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Web Feet summary: This comprehensive site contains some of the best fossil information on the Web. You can read about the museum itself, view online exhibits by time period or type of species, examine catalogs and collections, or take The Subway, a collection of links. Under Education and Public Outreach, you'll find a useful section called Learning from Fossils, which links to a set of classroom activities about rocks, fossils, and dinosaurs. Visitors should check the list of frequently asked questions, called PaleoFAQ
Classification of 2F-models, I by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The rational function analogue of a question of Schur and exceptionality of permutation representations( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Exploring generalities in the drivers of diversity patterns in fragmented landscapes: Multi-continental model cross-comparisons using butterflies by Natalie S Robinson( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Landscape modification is leaving an irrevocable scar on the planet, most notably through habitat fragmentation. Fragmented landscapes are often unable to support communities that once inhabited them, leading to unprecedented rates of global biodiversity loss. As a result, substantial research effort focuses on investigating the drivers of species' responses to habitat fragmentation, usually for one or a few species at select locations. This dissertation expands upon previous research in order to broaden understanding of the determinants of diversity patterns in fragmented landscapes. I modeled variation in among fragment butterfly diversity for entire communities, using both environmental attributes and species traits as predictors. I then compared models across three, widely separated fragmented landscapes. I found that patch area and water availability had consistent influences on butterfly diversity patterns; these factors may warrant inclusion into management policies for fragmented landscapes worldwide. Other predictors, e.g., butterfly wing length, had variable influences on diversity patterns, although results revealed similarities between certain study areas. For example, habitat heterogeneity influenced diversity patterns similarly in two study areas, possibly due to similarities in ecological and/or climatic characteristics (e.g., drought-prone summers). Furthermore, species traits played important, albeit inconsistent, roles in driving butterfly diversity patterns; this pattern also potentially driven by among location ecological and/or climatic conditions. In all, this integrative data reuse analysis demonstrated patterns that may provide crucial information for better understanding wide-spread species responses to habitat fragmentation. The final component of this dissertation was an exploration of questions that arose from the data reuse strategy employed: how different are models constructed from datasets obtained via disparate levels of survey effort, and what implications does this have for data reuse analyses. I constructed a new model using data collected via 2/3 of the full sampling effort for one dataset. The model was almost identical to that constructed from the full dataset, and the use of this ̀reduced sampling effort' dataset would thus have had negligible impact on previous results. This work provides insight into the sensitivity of downstream analyses to variation in survey methods, and substantiates the validity of analyses reusing datasets collected by different researchers
Expressing group elements as products of commutators by Robert M Guralnick( )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Classification of 2F-modules by Robert M Guralnick( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In memoriam Robert Steinberg( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Satellite sensor requirements for monitoring essential biodiversity variables of coastal ecosystems( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The biodiversity and high productivity of coastal terrestrial and aquatic habitats are the foundation for important benefits to human societies around the world. These globally distributed habitats need frequent and broad systematic assessments, but field surveys only cover a small fraction of these areas. Satellite‐based sensors can repeatedly record the visible and near‐infrared reflectance spectra that contain the absorption, scattering, and fluorescence signatures of functional phytoplankton groups, colored dissolved matter, and particulate matter near the surface ocean, and of biologically structured habitats (floating and emergent vegetation, benthic habitats like coral, seagrass, and algae). These measures can be incorporated into Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs), including the distribution, abundance, and traits of groups of species populations, and used to evaluate habitat fragmentation. However, current and planned satellites are not designed to observe the EBVs that change rapidly with extreme tides, salinity, temperatures, storms, pollution, or physical habitat destruction over scales relevant to human activity. Making these observations requires a new generation of satellite sensors able to sample with these combined characteristics: (1) spatial resolution on the order of 30 to 100‐m pixels or smaller; (2) spectral resolution on the order of 5nm in the visible and 10nm in the short‐wave infrared spectrum (or at least two or more bands at 1, 030, 1, 240, 1, 630, 2, 125, and/or 2, 260nm) for atmospheric correction and aquatic and vegetation assessments; (3) radiometric quality with signal to noise ratios (SNR) above 800 (relative to signal levels typical of the open ocean), 14‐bit digitization, absolute radiometric calibration <2%, relative calibration of 0.2%, polarization sensitivity <1%, high radiometric stability and linearity, and operations designed to minimize sunglint; and (4) temporal resolution of hours to days. We refer to these combined specifications as H4 imaging. Enabling H4 imaging is vital for the conservation and management of global biodiversity and ecosystem services, including food provisioning and water security. An agile satellite in a 3‐d repeat low‐Earth orbit could sample 30‐km swath images of several hundred coastal habitats daily. Nine H4 satellites would provide weekly coverage of global coastal zones. Such satellite constellations are now feasible and are used in various applications
 
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Symmetric and alternating groups as monodromy groups of Riemann surfaces I : generic covers and covers with many branch points
Covers
The rational function analogue of a question of Schur and exceptionality of permutation representationsThe rational function analogue of a question of Schur and exceptionality of permutation representations
Alternative Names
Guralnick, R.

Guralnick, Robert.

Guralnick, Robert 1950-

Guralnick, Robert Michael 1950-

Robert Guralnick mathematician

Robert Guralnick US-amerikanischer Mathematiker

Languages
English (58)