WorldCat Identities

Ryan, Sandra E.

Overview
Works: 34 works in 42 publications in 1 language and 934 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: SD144.A14, 627.122
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Sandra E Ryan
Constructing temporary sampling platforms for hydrologic studies by Manuel H Martinez( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 408 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper presents instructions for constructing platforms that span the width of stream channels to accommodate the measurement of hydrologic parameters over a wide range of discharges. The platforms provide a stable, safe, noninvasive, easily constructed, and relatively inexpensive means for permitting data collection without wading in the flow. We have used the basic techniques described herein for building platforms on channels of small to medium size, up to 70 feet in width. Lightweight joists, commonly used in housing construction, form the primary structural support for the platform. The structures can be constructed by persons having only rudimentary knowledge of building practices and using simple tools. Cost estimates for materials range from $200 to $1,500 depending on the required length of structure. The platforms have been used successfully in measuring flow and sediment discharge in subalpine channels in Colorado and Wyoming during runoff events with 2 to 5 year return frequencies. They are quite stable and are safer than wading in channels with fast moving flow
A tutorial on the piecewise regression approach applied to bedload transport data by Sandra E Ryan( )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 305 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This tutorial demonstrates the application of piecewise regression to bedload data to define a shift in phase of transport so that the reader may perform similar analyses on available data. The use of piecewise regression analysis implicitly recognizes different functions fit to bedload data over varying ranges of flow. The transition from primarily low rates of sand transport (Phase I) to higher rates of sand and coarse gravel transport (Phase II) is termed "breakpoint" and is defined as the flow where the fitted functions intersect. The form of the model used here fits linear segments to different ranges of data, though other types of functions may be used. Identifying the transition in phases is one approach used for defining flow regimes that are essential for self-maintenance of alluvial gravel bed channels. First, the statistical theory behind piecewise regression analysis and its procedural approaches are presented. The reader is then guided through an example procedure and the code for generating an analysis in SAS is outlined. The results from piecewise regression analysis from a number of additional bedload datasets are presented to help the reader understand the range of estimated values and confidence limits on the breakpoint that the analysis provides. The identification and resolution of problems encountered in bedload datasets are also discussed. Finally, recommendations on a minimal number of samples required for the analysis are proposed."
The nature of flow and sediment movement in Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming by Sandra E Ryan( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 181 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Sediment and flow measurements were made during the course of 13 runoff seasons between 1982 and 1997 on a gravel-bed stream near Bondurant, Wyoming. The data for Little Granite Creek, compiled through the efforts of the U.S. Geological Survey and USDA Forest Service, is one of the most comprehensive databases on transport processes for an individual site available as of this writing. Bedload, moved by flows ranging from 0.05 times to nearly twice the bankfull discharge, was measured with an original Helley-Smith bedload sampler while wading, while suspended from a bridge, or from a temporary sampling platform. Samples of suspended load were collected using depth-integrating samplers. Laboratory analyses were conducted in accordance with standard U.S. Geological Survey methods. Hydraulic data were taken from summaries of discharge measurements maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey and by supplemental measurements made by Forest Service personnel in 1997. All data on rates of bedload transport, particle-size distribution of individual samples, suspended sediment load, measurements of hydraulic geometry, and channel surveys are presented in tables and graphs."
Recovery of riparian shrubs following wildfire : influence of herbivory( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effects of flow diversion on downstream channel form in mountain streams by Sandra E Ryan( Book )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Diel variation in discharge and bedload transport in a subalpine stream during snowmelt runoff by Sandra E Ryan( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Coarse sediment transport in mountain streams in Colorado and Wyoming, USA by Sandra E Ryan( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stream sedimentation following the Boulder Creek burn in the Little Granite Creek watershed near Bondurant, WY [Abstract Only] by Sandra E Ryan( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Increased erosion and flooding are among the most visible and dramatic impacts on watersheds following wildfire. Changes in runoff and sedimentation patterns can affect channels, riparian corridors, and aquatic habitat for considerable distances downstream from the burned site. However, fire related sedimentation can be highly variable, depending on a number of physical variables, making the potential impact of wildfire on streams and riparian areas difficult to predict. To further complicate the matter, there is often little baseline data against which the impacts of fire-related disturbance may be evaluated. In this presentation, we describe the results of post-fire monitoring in the Little Granite Creek watershed (Wyoming) where there were extensive pre-burn data on rates of sediment transport. The goals are to quantify increases in sedimentation rates, changes in organic matter storage and transport, and riparian vegetation re-growth within and downstream of the burned area. Impacts observed to date include elevated concentrations of suspended sediment associated with snowmelt runoff and short-lived, hyperconcentrated flows associated with thunderstorms during the first 2 years post-fire. By the third year, increases in suspended sediment concentrations diminished. Re-growth of riparian vegetation, while sparse in the first year, increased substantially during the second and third years and appears to be intercepting shallow sediment flows from hillslopes in some locations. These results are useful to forest managers for addressing critical issues concerning resource fragility and system recovery, particularly of riparian areas, following wildfire."
Influence of herbivory on regrowth of riparian shrubs following a wildland fire( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Streamside vegetation frequently regenerates faster than upland vegetation following wildland fire and contributes to the recovery of riparian and stream ecosystems. Limited data are available, however, on the post-fire growth of riparian species and the influence of herbivory on regeneration. To determine post-fire regrowth of riparian vegetation, height, crown area, crown volume, and browse levels were measured for key riparian shrub species in streamside burned and unburned plots along second-order streams in western Wyoming. Shrubs in the burned plots were subject to high levels of browse - up to 84 percent of the leaders were browsed - by native ungulates in 2002, the second post-fire year (Sept. 2001 to Sept. 2002). In summer 2003, the burned watershed was also grazed by livestock, resulting in increased browse levels and decreased shrub heights for several species. In the third post-fire year, Sept. 2002 to Sept. 2003, four of the six most common species showed no increase in crown area or crown volume, indicating that the combination of native ungulate and cattle browsing suppressed their growth. Potential impacts of grazing on post-fire recovery of stream and riparian ecosystems are discussed."
Influence of large wood on channel morphology and sediment storage in headwater mountain streams, Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado by Sandra E Ryan( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Large fallen wood can have a significant impact on channel form and process in forested mountain streams. In this study, four small channels on the Fraser Experimental Forest near Fraser, Colorado, USA, were surveyed for channel geometries and largewood loading, including the size, source, and characteristics of individual pieces. The study is part of a larger effort to understand the impact of mountain pine beetle infestation on a suite of watershed properties. Here, we present baseline data collected at the onset of widespread tree mortality. Channels range from 1.5 to 2 min width, with slopes ranging from 3 to N10%. Median (D50) streambed particle sizes range from gravel to very coarse gravel. Channels are characterized as cascade, step-pool, and plane bed over varying scales. Large wood loads ranged from about 0.4 to 1.0 piece per meter length of channel, which is comparable to values reported for other Colorado sites. Much of the wood showed indications of being in place for long periods of time (decayed/rotten, broken into ramps, and partially buried in beds and banks). Nearly all surveyed reaches contained steps formed from small boulders and/or logs. Significant portions of the elevation drop in some of the reaches were made up by log steps, though the percentages varied (0 to 60%). Individual log steps trap a portion of the coarse sediment moved as bedload, forming wedge-shaped accumulations upstream of the logs. The particle size distributions for measured bedload and step accumulations largely overlapped, but more so for the coarse ends of the distributions, suggesting a trapping inefficiency for the finer component of bedload. Estimates of the total volume of sediment stored behind log steps were approximately an order of magnitude greater than the mean sediment volume exported on an annual basis, as determined from measured accumulations in weir ponds. The particle size distribution of sediment in the ponds - ranging from sand to medium gravel - is considerably finer than sediment stored in steps. The series of comparisons between storage volumes, particle size distributions, and sediment export suggests that log steps effectively trap coarse sediment moved in these small streams and act as a series of check dams that inhibit channel erosion, but may be less effective at trapping finer sediment (sand and small gravel)."
Wildfire impacts on stream sedimentation : re-visiting the Boulder Creek Burn in Little Granite Creek, Wyoming, USA by Sandra E Ryan( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Impacts of wildfire on runoff and sediment loads at Little Granite Creek, western Wyoming by Sandra E Ryan( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Baseline data on rates of sediment transport provide useful information on the inherent variability of stream processes and may be used to assess departure in channel form or process from disturbances. In August 2000, wildfire burned portions of the Little Granite Creek watershed near Bondurant, WY where bedload and suspended sediment measurements had been collected during 13 previous runoff seasons. This presented an opportunity to quantify increases in sediment loads associated with a large-scale natural disturbance. The first three years post-fire were warm and dry, with low snowpacks and few significant summer storms. Despite relatively low flows during the first runoff season, the estimated sediment load was about five times that predicted from regression of data from the pre-burn record. Increased sediment loading occurred during the rising limb and peak of snowmelt (54%) and during the few summer storms (44%). While high during the first post-fire year, total annual sediment yield decreased during the next two years, indicating an eventual return to baseline levels. The results from this sediment monitoring lacked some of the more dramatic responses that have been observed in other watersheds following fire. In other environments, moderate-to-high intensity rainstorms caused significant flooding, widespread debris flows and channel incision and aggradation. A few moderate intensity storms (b2 year recurrence interval) occurred in the Little Granite Creek watershed, but they did not trigger this type of response. Instead, ash and charcoal rich discharges (herein described as "blackwater flows") and heavily sediment laden flows were observed without physical evidence of debris flows, as defined by channel incision into previously unchanneled areas. Speculatively, the sedimentation pattern and geomorphic response in Little Granite Creek may be fairly typical of stream responses to wildfire during times of continued drought and in the absence of widespread, significant rainfall, representing one type of response on a continuum of effects following wildfire."
Historical and on-going hydrologic and sediment transport research at Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Measurements of sediment flux and flow were made during the course of 13 runoff seasons in a small watershed near Bondurant, Wyoming. Begun in 1982 through the combined efforts of the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Forest Service, the database from Little Granite Creek represents one of the most comprehensive sources of information on stream transport processes available for an individual site. In August 2000 a wildfire burned portions of the watershed, creating an opportunity to monitor the impacts of fire on stream processes and water quality. Scientists from the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station initiated studies in 2001 to assess the magnitude of increased runoff and sedimentation generated by spring snowmelt and summer thunderstorms following wildfire. Additional work was initiated in 2002 on the post-fire dynamics of organic matter (dissolved, fine, and coarse), the status of aquatic macroinvertebrates and fish, and the re-establishment of vegetation in the riparian corridor. In this paper, we describe the monitoring effort in the Little Granite watershed and present preliminary results from the first year after burning. Such data are useful for planning future Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) efforts, validating erosion models (such as WEPP), and evaluating long-term sensitivity of aquatic systems to wildfire
Bedload movement in a mountain gravel-bed stream : a video by Sandra E Ryan( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Bedload movement in a mountain gravel-bed stream by Sandra E Ryan( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The nature of flow and sediment movement in Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming by Sandra E Ryan( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Rates of gully erosion along Pikes Peak Highway, Colorado, USA by Harry A Katz( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The use of pressure-diff[e]rence samplers in measuring bedload transport in small, coarse-grained alluvial channels by Sandra E Ryan( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Pressure-difference samplers remain the most widely used devices for obtaining estimates of bedload transport in natural stream systems. This report describes some of these devices, citing the advantages and limitations of their use in small, coarse-grained alluvial channels. In a recent study, samples collected using three of these devices were tested to determine comparability. The rating curves were then integrated over flow records and the results compared with 31 years of annual accumulation collected from a weir pond. While there can be significant differences in the mass of material collected by different pressure-difference samplers, they generally produced data from which reasonable simulations of total accumulation could be derived."
Measurement of coarse gravel and cobble transport using portable bedload traps( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Acoustic gravel-transport sensor : description and field tests in Little Granite Creek, Wyoming, USA( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Languages
English (28)