WorldCat Identities

Fabiosa, Jacinto F.

Overview
Works: 36 works in 48 publications in 1 language and 150 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HD1401, 382.41
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jacinto F Fabiosa
A policy model for the livestock and poultry sectors of Mexico by Chad Barrett( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A new general conceptual approach to modeling the livestock sector : an application to the Japanese swine-pork sector by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What effect does free trade in agriculture have on developing country populations around the world? by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Highlighted in the "battle in Seattle" in 1999, anti-trade sentiments still persist, even with development considerations placed at the core of reform negotiations at the World Trade Organization, in which two-thirds of the members are developing countries. In this paper, the impact of agricultural trade liberalization on food consumption through changes in income and prices is considered. First, agricultural trade liberalization is estimated to raise economic growth by 0.43% and 0.46% in developing and industrialized countries, respectively. Since food consumption of households with lower income are more responsive to changes in income, their food consumption increases more under a trade liberalization regime. Second, trade liberalization is expected to raise world commodity prices in the range of 3% to 34%. Since, in general, border protection is much higher in developing countries and the level of their tariff rates are likely to exceed the rate of price increases, 87% to 99% of the 83 to 98 countries examined would have lower domestic prices under liberalization. Again, given that low-income countries are more responsive to changes in prices, food consumption in these countries would increase more. Finally, empirical evidence shows that if there is any harm on small net selling producers in a net importing country, it is neither large in scale nor widespread because the substitution effect dominates the net income effect from the lower domestic prices
Philippine agriculture and GATT reforms by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Institutional impact of GATT : an examination of market integration and efficiency in the world beef and wheat market under the GATT regime by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An econometric decomposition of aggregate data : application to the EU-15 average cattle slaughter weight by V Premakumar( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

World impacts of foot and mouth disease in Taiwan by Frank Harland Fuller( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Land-use credits to corn ethanol : accounting for distillers dried grains with solubles as a feed substitute in swine rations by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many studies on the impact of biofuels on greenhouse gas emissions do not consider indirect land-use change and land use avoided because of co-products utilization. This paper provides estimates of the land-use credit for corn ethanol when its by-product -- distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) -- is used in swine feed rations to substitute for corn and soymeal. The range of estimates used here covers the land-use credit used in the literature. Moreover, this study departs from earlier studies because feed rations from a least-cost optimization are used rather than rations from feeding trials, and DDGS nutrient profile variability is fully accounted for. As a result, displacement rates and the land-use credit can be better characterized using a distribution rather than a single point estimate. The land-use credit for corn ethanol for DDGS used in swine feed rations ranges from -0.367 to -0.596 hectares, whereby substitution for corn in the feed ration accounts for 56.09% and soymeal substitution contributes 48.46%. Variability of the land-use credit is contributed more by the variability of land use from the substitution of soymeal than that of corn. Finally, when feed compounders discount the DDGS nutrient profile to ensure they are at or above any realized nutrient profile 90% of the time, the land-use credit for corn ethanol declines by 8.47% for DDGS in a swine feed ration
Brazil, the future of modern agriculture? by Holger Matthey( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A review of agricultural policy evolution, agricultural data sources, and food supply and demand studies in Egypt by Ibrahim Soliman( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Land allocation effects of the global ethanol surge : predictions from the international FAPRI model( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We quantify the emergence of biofuel markets and its impact on U.S. and world agriculture for the coming decade using the multi-market, multi-commodity international FAPRI (Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute) model. The model incorporates the trade-offs between biofuel, feed, and food production and consumption and international feedback effects of the emergence through world commodity prices and trade. We examine land allocation by type of crop, and pasture use for countries growing feedstock for ethanol (corn, sorghum, wheat, sugarcane, and other grains) and major crops competing with feedstock for land resources such as oilseeds. We shock the model with exogenous changes in ethanol demand, first in the United States, then in Brazil, China, the European Union-25, and India, and compute shock multipliers for land allocation decisions for crops and countries of interest. The multipliers show at the margin how sensitive land allocation is to the growing demand for ethanol. Land moves away from major crops and pasture competing for resources with feedstock crops. Because of the high U.S. tariff on ethanol, higher U.S. demand for ethanol translates into a U.S. ethanol production expansion. The latter has global effects on land allocation as higher coarse grain prices transmit worldwide. Changes in U.S. coarse grain prices also affect U.S. wheat and oilseed prices, which are all transmitted to world markets. In contrast, expansion in Brazil ethanol use and production chiefly affects land used for sugarcane production in Brazil and to a lesser extent in other sugar-producing countries, but with small impacts on other land uses in most countries
Impact of the South Korea-U.S. free trade agreement on the U.S. livestock sector by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The recently signed Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA) grants the U.S. livestock industry with preferential access to South Korea's import market. This study evaluates the likely impacts of the KORUS FTA on the U.S. livestock sector. Using the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute's modeling system, we find that livestock prices increase by 0.5% to 3.8% under the agreement. And together with an expansion by 381 to 883 million pounds in meat exports, the value of U.S. exports increase by close to U.S.$2 billion, or a 15.2% increase. Because of differential baseline starting market shares and differential rates and staging specifications, the beef sector results are primarily driven by trade diversion impacts, while a combination of trade diversion and trade creation characterizes the results in pork and poultry sectors
Does the U.S. midwest have a cost advantage over China in producing corn, soybeans, and hogs? by Cheng Fang( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jamaica technical manual : conceptual framework and software documentation( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The impact of ownership structure on the performance of China's feed mill sector by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A case study of China's commercial pork value chain by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Egypt's household expenditures pattern : does it alleviate a food crisis? by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We estimated a system of Engel functions for two survey periods, 1999/2000 and 2004/2005, to quantify the impact of changes of income on household expenditure behavior and to investigate how expenditure responsiveness changes with income. We found that rural households have a higher expenditure share for food categories but a lower share for non-food categories compared to urban households. The expenditure share did not change so much between the two survey periods, with only a slight decline in the share of cereals-bread and the non-food category and an increase in the meat-fish-dairy category. All estimates have a good fit, and the total expenditure explanatory variable is significant in all equations. In general, households with lower incomes are more responsive to changes in income for food categories, and less responsive for non-food categories. This is evident with the higher income elasticity of lower-income rural households compared to urban households for food categories. Moreover, elasticities in the 2004/2005 survey period are higher compared to the 1999/2000 period. Per capita real income declined by 37.2% in 2004/2005. This consumption expenditure pattern has an alleviating effect on the impact of a food crisis since a lower real income associated with a food crisis is accompanied by greater responsiveness of households to reduce their demand for food as their real incomes shrink. This adjustment behavior is most obvious in the case of bread and cereals in rural areas, in which the expenditure elasticity increased from 0.50 to 0.91 as per capita income declined
Distillers dried grain product innovation and its impact on adoption, inclusion, substitution, and displacement rates in a finishing hog ration by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study finds that the use of distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS) as feed is greatly influenced by the development of DDGS products that are available in the market. We find that newer-generation DDGS products have a higher optimal inclusion rate, reaching the maximum allowable rate of 20% for swine, and they have a higher displacement rate of 0.23 for soymeal and 0.93 for corn. Although both traditional and newer-generation DDGS products are primarily used as a corn substitute for energy, it will take only a relatively small change in the price or matrix A (or both) for the newer-generation DDGS to primarily substitute for soymeal for the limiting amino acid, lysine. In contrast, traditional DDGS products have a lower optimal inclusion rate of 7%, and they have a lower displacement rate of 0.75 for corn and 0.08 for soy meal. This product is primarily used as a corn substitute for energy. When traditional DDGS is introduced in a feed ration, total feed cost declines by 2.64%, or a reduction of $0.29 per cwt of feed. This translates into a $2.17 per head savings in feed cost in a feeder-to-finish operation. Using newer-generation DDGS reduces feed cost by 9.88%, or a reduction of $1.08 per cwt of feed, saving feeder-finisher operations $8.06 per head. This study suggests that as a substitute product, the price of DDGS will track the price of both corn and soymeal. It will be more of the former until new-generation DDGS can be used as a primary substitute for soymeal and take a dominant share of the market. Finally, this study clearly points to the critical importance of DDG product innovation to promote widespread and optimal use of DDGS as a feed ingredient, thereby alleviating the food-feed-fuel trade-off
The food-away-from-home consumption expenditure pattern in Egypt by Jacinto F Fabiosa( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Assessing China's potential import demand for distillers dried grain implications for grain trade( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A team of U.S. analysts visited China to assess the potential for use of distillers dried grain plus solubles (DDGS) in China's livestock sector. They examined the economics of the use of DDGS in feeds, the policy issues surrounding the use of the product, and transportation-logistic constraints in the expansion of DDGS imports. The team collected actual and secondary data to conduct a micro-economic analysis of the impact of DDGS on feed cost, solicited official and expert opinions through interviews, and conducted site visits. They found the development of the DDGS import market in China to be very promising. The microeconomic analysis showed a clear economic incentive for feed millers and livestock producers to use DDGS in their feed ration, with a potential savings of $1 per hundredweight of mixed feed, representing a 6% feed cost savings. Moreover, China has the livestock numbers to support a DDGS market. Concerns about myctoxin contamination and nutrient profile variability must be addressed, however. Clearly differentiating imported DDGS from domestic DDGS is key in positioning U.S. DDGS in the Chinese market. Also, a science-based, and pro-active approach is needed to address policy-induced barriers
 
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