WorldCat Identities

McIntosh, James F. 1923-

Overview
Works: 220 works in 224 publications in 1 language and 296 library holdings
Genres: Military history  Biography  Personal narratives‡vAmerican  History  Anecdotes  Records and correspondence 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about James F McIntosh
 
Most widely held works by James F McIntosh
Wisconsin at war( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Imnterviews with Wisconsin veterans about their experiences in warfare during the 20th century
Oral history interview with Mark A. Nagan by Mark A Nagan( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nagan, a Kaukauna, Wis. native, discusses his World War II service as a glider with the 325th Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division and his experiences in the European theater of operation
Oral history interview with Donald L. Heiliger by Donald L Heiliger( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Heiliger, born in Madison (Wisconsin), delves into his experience as a F105 Pilot in the 333rd Fighter Squadron during the Vietnam War and his six years as a prisoner of war. Heiliger attended navigator training for four years and then enjoyed teaching navigation before attending pilot training. He trained in T-37s, T-38s and F105s. Heiliger goes into detail about experiences on nuclear alert for Korea from Japan. He arrived in Japan in November of 1965 and was shot down one and a half years later in an F105. Heiliger says that the most common weapons he flew with were six 150-pound bombs and a Gatling gun. He relates a story about shooting at water buffalo near the Viet Cong in Laos, which he did not enjoy. Heiliger is mentioned in a book; MiG Killers, but never shot down a MiG himself. He points out that the F105s were not very good air-to-air fighters and their orders were to just get away from other aircraft. Heliger has flown out of Osan (Korea), Mito (Japan), Takhi (Thailand), and once landed in Da Nang (Vietnam). He explains that in October and November of 1967 they were losing one F105 a day in Vietnam, the first time Heiliger went down in a plane was in 1967 while flying a D105. Heiliger relates stories of refueling in the air and adds a scary story about a disconnect from the fueler not working. He tells that he worked in a unit nicknamed "Ryan's Raiders," called so because they were under the command of General "Black Jack" Ryan. Heiliger reveals how the air war was controlled out of Saigon and how the operations worked and that a lot of money was spent bringing in technical people from the United States to enhance the radar. His best friend was shot down and killed three nights before Heiliger went down the second time. He explains that their targets were anything from rail yards to army camps and his target on the night he was shot down was Kep Marshalling Yard, about thirty miles northeast of Hanoi. On May 15, 1967 he was running his eleventh mission with Ryan's Raiders with Major Ben Pollard as his back-seater. While he discusses the weaponry he carried that night he explains figuring circular error probability (CEP) and expresses the feelings he experienced, "You're going to be a little more excited; you're breathing a little more heavily up there." He goes into detail about having to fly through the buffer zone between China and Vietnam, the preparation for the attack and that one of their electronic countermeasure pods (ECM) was not working, which would help jam the radar of opposing planes. Heiliger illustrates getting hit and fire igniting in the F105 before he and Pollard had to eject; Pollard went first. Heiliger discusses ejecting from the plane, his twenty minute descent, what supplies he had, his injuries, and what happened after he landed in a tree, "There was no moon. Go underneath the canopy of the jungle. That is really dark. And so I thought, okay, one thing they teach you is you don't fool around in trees at night. You don't fool around in trees." He did not know where the plane went, but relates that on the 16th of May the State Department sent a letter apologizing to China stating that one of their planes may have intruded their territory. He explains that after getting down he watched a village and was eventually discovered by villagers and they took everything except his underwear and boots. He broke his .38 gun so they couldn't use it. Heiliger paints a picture of what it was like in the village and not seeing any anger until two communist cadres arrived and frenzied up the crowd. He was held at gunpoint inside a hut for about forty minutes and thought he may die, "And after a few seconds of that, I was convinced that that was my time to go. Once you're past that, actually, the fear goes, I think. I wasn't afraid anymore." Heiliger reports that he was taken away by jeep and found Pollard whose back was badly injured. Upon arriving at the "Hanoi Hilton" (Hoa Loa Prison), he was separated from Pollard for five years. Heiliger discusses the Honor Code several times (only revealing name, rank, serial number to captors) and being told "We don't want to torture--they never used torture, the word is punish. We never want to punish you, so whatever happens it's your fault. That was always the reason. It's your fault you're being punished because you won't do what they want you to. It's not our fault. We don't want to do this, but you won't cooperate so you're forcing us to punish you." He provides a sketch of the torture he endured, including clubbings, the use of screw cuffs, and u-bolts. Heliger explains that he was taken to another prison nicknamed "The Zoo," which used to be a French film school. He describes the various means of communication between prisoners; five-by-five matrix tap codes, sign language, writing on toilet paper, and fashioning ink out of various items they accumulated. They even wrote entire books, such as text books and lists of others being tortured on toilet paper. He mentions his disdain for people he thought were not supportive of the war such as California Governor Jerry Brown and several traitors who gave in to their captors' demands. Heiliger estimates that there were about 337 total prisoners at Hanoi until 1969 and 1970 and then about 600; he was about number 150. Heiliger delves into his experiences getting to know himself and others at the prison, what they did to pass the time, and his own difficulty in receiving mail from home, and the reception he received from various family members when he returned home. He explains the order of release from the prison and how many people were wounded or died. Heiliger was returned to Clark Air Force Base then stayed in the service for twelve years before attending George Washington University for a masters degree in Latin-American studies and international relations. He received two purple hearts, a distinguished service medal, a meritorious service medal, retired as a colonel then later retired as the vice president of a marketing firm in Washington D.C. Heiliger discusses his opinions on Chile and Allende and his thoughts on the Vietnam War as a whole; "Vietnam I look at, and maybe this rationalizes it, people say we lost the Vietnam War, we did this. We won the Cold War. I look at it that way. Everything between World War II and the end, when the Berlin wall fell and everything else fell, were battles to the final victory."
Oral history interview with Robert L. Beilman by Robert L Beilman( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Robert Beilman, a New York City native, discusses his World War II Army experiences which include several anecdotal stories. Beilman recalls being at a New York Giants football game the day Pearl Harbor was bombed and an announcement being made for all present active military to immediately report to their bases. He enlisted in the ASTP (Army Specialized Training Program), studied engineering at Syracuse University (New York), and following radio communication school, was assigned to C Company, 1st Battalion of the 242nd Regiment, 42nd Division. Beilman talks about meeting his parents on pass prior to departing for Marseilles on the SS General William S. Black. While on duty in Marseilles, he describes the patrols and several air raids. As a communications sergeant, Beilman discusses his use of call-signs, radios, walkie-talkies, and stringing wire to outposts. Beilman describes preparing for patrols, dangers they encountered while on patrol, and dangers they faced. Beilman relates a story of capturing a German soldier in France. Beilman describes fighting the Germans in a typical French village. He talks about his battalion being surrounded at the battle of Hatton in the Northern part of Alsace to which Beilman credits the 79th Division for rescuing them. Beilman describes battling German tanks and their tactics. Participating in night patrols, Beilman recounts the need for excellent night vision and describes the numerous ways soldiers could be spotted by producing the smallest amount of light. Beilman describes the engagement he led resulting in him receiving the Bronze Star. He relates the story of General McOlive giving the order to drive up to Brenner Pass with lights on. Beilman attended Fordham and Columbia University upon his return to the United States using the GI Bill. After completing medical school, he chose to settle in Madison (Wisconsin)
Oral history interview with Burt S. Avedon by Burt S Avedon( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Burt Avedon, a New York native, discusses his service as a pilot for the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War, his involvement in the Israeli War of 1967 and the development of "Top Gun" school. Avedon talks about learning to fly by the age of twelve while a military school student and subsequently joining the American Volunteer Group (AVG) in China in 1941. After returning from China, Avedon describes joining the Navy, completing naval flight training, and moving among different aircraft carriers during World War II. He recalls several stories of putting flight instructors to the test when they didn't know about his flying experience. Avedon provides detailed descriptions of many types of aircraft including F4U Corsairs, F6Fs Hellcats, F9s Cougars, F8Fs Bearcats and his experience having to ditch a plane in the water. Avedon discusses the conditions and quality of the Japanese pilots and criticizes the accuracy of the movie "Pearl Harbor" (2001). He expresses second thoughts about killing others and describes himself and others as political pawns in wartime. Avedon describes one incident that got him in trouble which resulted in the punishment of towing targets for anti-aircraft batteries and several times his aircraft was shot up and he was forced to land. As a member of the active reserve, Avedon was called back for service during the Korean War flying around 300 missions. Upon returning from Korea, Avedon describes serving in Europe and his involvement in the Israeli war of 1967. He describes completing test pilot school, conducting tests and compares other airplanes to the U.S. models. Avedon discusses the situation that led to the formation of "Top Gun" school, his involvement in the development of that program's syllabus and retiring in 1972 after thirty years of service. Avedon mentions his graduation from Harvard Business School in 1950 and working for a company that was bought by Lands' End that brought him to Madison (Wisconsin). During the 50th anniversary of D-Day, Avedon describes his participation in an NBC supported dogfight re-enactment. He recalls volunteering for Vietnam, but not being allowed to go and explains why he doesn't attend reunions
Oral history interview with Winter S. Hess by Winter S Hess( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Winter Hess, an Auburn, Wisconsin veteran, discusses his Vietnam War service monitoring enemy lines with the Army. He talks about getting his induction delayed until the end of deer season, basic and advanced infantry training at Fort Ord (California), officer training at Fort Sill (Oklahoma), attempting to decline a commission, being given an artillery military occupation specialty even though he demonstrated a "lack of commitment," and ground sensor operator training school at Fort Huachuca (Arizona). As a passive ground sensor monitor he was part of McNamara's Line and the "Igloo White" project and he comments on the types and positions of sensors and calling artillery fire based on the sensors. Hess also mentions flying over the "I" Corps area with the Air Force, flying with Marines to drop sensors from 100 feet off the ground, and going on bombing runs with Air Force pilots to monitor sensors. Stationed at Chu Lai, he comments on being under rocket attacks and rifle fire and taking cover in fox holes. He recalls his last three months as non-commissioned officer in charge of Hawk Hill firebase's sensor team assisting the 198th Infantry Brigade. Hess provides a detailed account of several missions including one where an engine failed, another where his plane almost flew into an Arc Light B-52 strike, and another where the pilot became lost and they ended up over the South China Sea
Oral history interview with Henry R. Zach by Henry R Zach( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Henry Zach, a Burnett County, Wis. native, discusses his World War II service with the 32nd Armored Regiment of the 3rd Armored Division and gives a vivid account of his experiences during the Malmedy Massacre at Baugnez (Belgium). He talks about armored training, fighting at St. Mere-Eglise and Caen, and his role as reconnaissance for his platoon. Zach comments on the organization and strategy of an armored reconnaissance unit including vehicle mobility, radio contact, and the problem of sniper fire. He touches upon encountering the "dragon's teeth" and rest and relaxation in Paris. Zach was taken prisoner at the Battle of the Bulge and vividly recalls being captured and searched for valuables by German soldiers, the march to Baugnez, and his discovery of the Germans' intent to kill them. Held in a field with a number of other American soldiers, Zach details being shot at by German soldiers, kicked to determine if he was still living, several instances of gun fire at Americans lying in the field, and being rescued by an American captain and two enlisted men. He returned to the United States and addresses medical care received, leg wound problems, and attempts to increase his disability pay
Oral history interview with Helen Bertalan by Helen Bertalan( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Folsom (California) veteran describes her experience as a member of the 101st General Hospital stationed at the Santa Tomas Hospital (Manila, Philippines) during World War II. Bertalan, a Wedron (Illinois) native, touches upon her surprise and shock upon hearing of the bombing of Pearl Harbor and compares her reaction to Pearl Harbor to reactions of the events of September 11, 2001. Bertalan, an assistant pediatric head nurse, recalls her eagerness to join the army and basic training at Camp McCoy (Wis.). She touches upon the ranks and pay of women in the military as well as her hope of being stationed in England so she could serve near her husband. Transferred to Camp Swift (Texas), she describes caring for German prisoners of war (POWs) and receiving a painting as a gift from a POW. Sent to Camp Stillman (California) in preparation for overseas duty in the Philippines, Bertalan discusses watching film strips of German war atrocities and her belief that they were shown to show how "bad they [Nazis] really were." Sent to Manila (Philippines) Bertalan worked in the orthopedic ward as a supervisor. She talks about recreation activities of woman nurses, taking quinine pills, her enjoyment of the Philippines, and interactions with Filipino civilians. She touches upon her work at Percy Jones Hospital (Michigan) where she worked with amputees, discharge in 1945 due to marital status, and working as a public health nurse
Oral history interview with Robert E. Clampitt by Robert E Clampitt( )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Robert E. Clampitt, a Cross Plains, Wisconsin resident, discusses his career with the Army spanning the Korean, Cold, and Vietnam Wars. Clampitt was born in Terre Haute, Indiana and graduated high school in Madison, Wisconsin in 1946. He states he tried to enlist in the Army when he turned 18, but the military made him wait until he finished high school. He declares that his intention to join the Army was to later qualify for the GI Bill and go to college. He reports that he was sent to Fort McClellan [Alabama] for basic training and then to Fort Riley [Kansas] for Intelligence School. Soon after he describes being deployed to Italy along the Isonzo River with the 88th Division, Company K, 350th Infantry. Clampitt recounts being sent there because of tensions along the border with Yugoslavs. He also describes some of the grim living conditions that Italian civilians faced after World War II. After a year in Italy, Clampitt reports being discharged and coming back to Madison where he joined the Army Reserve as part of the 84th Airborne Division. Before going off to jump school and getting his parachute wings at Fort Benning [Georgia], Clampitt mentions he got married. When the Korean War broke out, Clampitt speaks of his decision to volunteer to active duty with the regular Army. After being sent to Camp Atterbury [Indiana[, Clampitt talks about heading to Korea with the 24th Division where he served as Staff Sergeant and was assigned to guarding prisoners. After his enlistment in Korea was finished, Clampitt reveals that he re-enlisted for the 25th Division, "'cause they were goin' to Hawaii ... and that seemed like a better place than South Korea." Clampitt recalls many of his experiences at Schofield Barracks [Hawaii] from 1954 to 1956, including having his second child, training on the side of a volcano, and how his Division was used in the 1956 film "Between Heaven and Hell". Clampitt describes getting a job as an instructor through the non-commissioned officer academy until he went home. From this training, Clampitt states he was able to get a job as a ROTC instructor at the University of Illinois-Chicago. He reflects on how much he enjoyed teaching American military history and how much he felt like a faculty member. He touches upon the differences between that teaching assignment and a later experience at the University of Wisconsin. He briefly touches upon a three-month training through the Mountain Warfare School at Camp Hale [Colorado]. He provides some anecdotes of using mules to carry equipment up the mountain. Clampitt explains that he re-enlisted for six years in 1960 and was sent to Germany with the 24th Division. He describes his recon patrol along the Berlin Wall and recalls his impression of dealing with the East Germans. He recounts one particular experience of spotting a Russian soldier near the Brandenburg Gate. He briefly mentions traveling around Germany during his time there with his wife and family. By the time he left Germany, Clampitt states he had become Sergeant First Class. Clampitt mentions that he had tried several times to volunteer to go to Vietnam while still in Germany, and in 1965 he states he was given orders to attend Special Warfare School to prepare for Vietnam. He talks about the training at Fort Bragg [North Carolina] before heading to Vietnam as a ranger battalion in the 3rd Corps where he called in air strikes via radio. Next, he describes working at the 3rd Corps Tactical Operations Center as a Non-Commissioned Officer-In-Charge (NCOIO). He speaks of keeping track of the situation map along with American and Vietnamese officers. Clampitt talks about how his tour ended short because his wife was involved in a serious auto accident and touches on dealing with the recovery. He states that was re-assigned to the University of Wisconsin as an Operations Center Sergeant, where he states he was treated like a second-class citizen. Clampitt illustrates the atmosphere on campus during the Vietnam protests and riots, especially towards police officers and military personnel. After his wife was able to recover, Clampitt tells of his return to Vietnam in 1968. He states he served as an advisor to the Regional Forces Popular Forces (RFPF) and was sent to the Mekong Delta, which according to Clampitt was a particularly dangerous place. He laughs while remembering what he told his wife before he left: "If I write back and tell you I'm in the Delta, call the insurance man and tell him to start the paperwork and just wait for the date." Clampitt provides a sketch of the region in 1968 and illustrates some of the frustration and difficulties of working with the RFPF. "When they were good, they were very, very good, and when they were bad they were horrid" he says of the RFPF. Clampitt reveals one particularly scary incident of being out with the Popular Force one night and having the feeling that they would turn him and another officer over to the VC before the night was over. He describes how the incident started when one of the PF soldiers stole a captain's pistol. Before things got out of hand, Clampitt says he pretended to be on the radio to a ship that was close by that he describes as "spooky" to the PF soldiers, which prevented them from turning on them. He recounts what happened next: "We went to the colonel the next day ... and said 'We recommend that no more Americans go to this, to help with this platoon. And furthermore, we both refuse to go out.' He said 'What if I order you to go out?' I said 'We will both refuse.'" Clampitt goes on to give his opinion on the North Vietnamese Soldiers and recalls some of his observation missions. He points out an incident where he found a 500-pound bomb and describes how the cheap wrist watch to set it off did not work. Clampitt also recalls encounters with the actor Jimmy Stewart and General Abrams. He describes the food and weather in Vietnam. Clampitt finished his tour in 1969, and states he was sent back to Fort Riley [Kansas] and was promoted to 1st Sergeant. He tells that he stayed there for two years before deciding to retire, stating his reason being he did not want to go on for a third tour of Vietnam. He then recounts his life after retiring from the Army, how he came back to civilian life in Sun Prairie, getting a job as the Chief of Police in Cross Plains, and becoming involved in the American Legion
Oral history interview with David O'Dea by David O'Dea( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Madison, Wis. native, discusses his World War II service with the 11th Regimental Combat Team, 5th Infantry Division serving in Europe. In basic training when Pearl Harbor was attacked, O'Dea served overseas for the whole of the war. He talks about training with the browning automatic rifle (BAR) at Fort Custer (Michigan), duty in Iceland to prevent German occupation of the island, friendly attitude of Icelanders toward the Germans, and the little amount soldiers interacted with the Icelanders. O'Dea tells of seeing the bodies of Merchant Marines who were killed by a German submarine, additional training in England and Northern Ireland, and orders to France in July of 1944. He describes moving to the front lines, passing the bodies of German troops, repulsing a German attack, carrying the radio alongside the company commander, and seeing American planes bomb St. Lo. He tells of being ambushed while driving through Angers (France), trying to reach the "Falaise Gap" to cut off the Germans, and advancing faster then the gas supply. At the Mosell River front, he touches upon heavy fire, learning to recognize the noise of a shell overhead, and the skill of German machine gunners. O'Dea describes being called for the Battle of the Bulge and taking civilian's white bedsheets to camouflage his uniform. He mentions brief occupation duty in Germany, using the GI Bill to buy a house, and joining the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW)
Oral history interview with Robert L. Ayer by Robert L Ayer( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Robert Ayer, a St. Paul (Minnesota) native, describes conducting missions with the 465th Bomb Group of the 744th Bomb Squad and his prisoner of war experiences in World War II. Ayer recalls obtaining his parents' approval to enlist and basic training experiences. Ayer recounts crew camaraderie, being hit by flack during a mission, and subsequently having to manually pump the flaps in order to land. A nose gunner in a B-24, Ayer describes being shot down, parachuting into France, his initial attempts to avoid capture, and being captured by Germans. He recounts his initial conversations following capture, discussing the war with a German officer and being interrogated by Germans. Ayer describes in-processing at the POW (prisoner of war) camp Stalag Luft IV, how the prisoners organized themselves, trading with guards, and methods of smuggling contraband. He describes being escorted by the Germans away from the approaching Russian Army, the little food they received, and staying in farmers' barns. Ayer relates meeting a German mother of six soldiers and trading a pair of shoes for bread. Later during the several hundred kilometer march through the German countryside, Ayer traded the watch he received from his parents for his high school graduation for a couple loaves of bread. Ayer describes events leading up to and following Russians overrunning the German line at their location. He relates an incident of an American sergeant being hung by American prisoners and Russian soldiers raping German women. Following the end of the war, Ayer relates experiences trying to get transportation out of Europe, his frustration not being able to return home immediately, and having to remain in both Scotland and England waiting for transport. After the war, Ayer returned to Wisconsin and attended Madison Business College before working for Monroe Calculating. Ayer is a member of the Disabled American Veterans (DAV)
Oral history interview with Herbert Samuel Roth by Herbert Samuel Roth( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Herbert "Sam" Roth, a Mauston, Wisconsin native, discusses his service with the 32nd Division Wisconsin National Guard and in Europe with the 93rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion during World War II. In 1937 at age sixteen, Roth talks about enlisting with the 121st Field Artillery, 32nd Division, summer training in Wisconsin, and hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor while doing war games at Camp Beauregard (Louisiana). After graduating from officer candidate school at Fort Sill as a second lieutenant, he speaks of assignment to the service battery of the 93rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion, 6th Armored Division. Sent overseas, Roth discusses staging in Oran (Algeria), duties as assistant battalion supply officer, and the bombardment of Monte Cassino (Italy). He comments on his battalion's armaments, ammunition use, daily transportation of supplies, and distribution of medical personnel. Roth speaks of the weather in Italy, invading southern France with Task Force Butler, participation in the battle of Montelimar, and being unable to unload needed ammunition from Merchant Marine-run ships on Sundays. Attached to the 10th Armored Division after entering southern Germany, he talks about weather, promotion to captain and battalion supply officer, and ending the war in Imst (Austria). Roth details being awarded a Bronze Star for directing artillery fire on a German ambush at the battle of Crailsheim. He recalls capturing some German prisoners of war and dropping them off at the next town. He mentions occupation duty at Heilbronn (Germany) guarding supplies and public buildings. Roth speaks of getting married while at officer candidate school, joining the Officers Reserve Corps, and a medical discharge in 1953 for asthma. He addresses using the GI Bill to earn a degree as a chemical engineer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his civilian career
Oral history interview with James E. Rowsam by James E Rowsam( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

James E. Rowsam, a Plainfield, Wisconsin native, discusses his career in the Army, including service in the Korean War with the 64th Engineer Maintenance Company, the Vietnam War with the 826th Ordnance Company, and the Army Reserves. Rowsam tells of enlisting in the Army, basic training at Breckenridge (Kentucky), and struggling to be assigned to the Corps of Engineers. Sent as a replacement to the Headquarters & Service Company, 7th Infantry, 13th Combat Engineer Battalion in Sendai (Japan), he discusses heavy equipment mechanics school, repairing and operating heavy equipment, rebuilding a Japanese school, and assisting with English lessons. Rowsam comments on going through amphibious training and being attached to the Marine Corps. He details what he was doing when the war started, being sent back to his unit in Sapporo, and running across a woman from his hometown who was working for the Department of the Army. He mentions leaving Japan for Inchon (Korea), turning back from the landing to pick up ammunition for a firing battery, being hit in the head by a falling ceiling beam, and being treated at an aide station by a tired corpsman. After catching up with his unit near Seoul, Rowsam touches on working with bridge trucks, repairing roads, catching frostbite, and landing at Iwon. He tells of trying to heat up frozen food, finding an artillery tractor abandoned in a ditch, and constant stress. Rowsam describes fighting up to the Yalu River with A Company of the 17th Regiment, being wounded in the foot by shrapnel, and being evacuated from Hungnam by a British cargo ship. Returned to the Headquarters & Service Company, he refers to work in the "Iron Triangle" region including surviving a truck accident, losing new replacement troops to a mortar. He touches on his rotation home and suffering from malaria. After having his service date extended a year, Rowsam talks about serving as field first sergeant of the 62nd Engineer Maintenance Company at Fort Bragg (North Carolina), practicing heavy equipment airdrops, taking an advanced diesel engine rebuild course at Fort Belvoir (Virginia), and nearly getting court-martialed for teaching a trick of adding diesel to radiators when no antifreeze is available. He recalls an emotional meeting on the street with a soldier whom he'd saved from freezing to death in Korea. Rowsam speaks of getting discharged, marrying a nurse, having problems with the leg that had been frostbitten, and using the GI Bill to attend college and graduate school. He comments on joining the active Army Reserves and being assigned to the 826th Ammunition Ordnance Company in Madison (Wisconsin). Rowsam recalls hearing about his unit's activation in 1968 on the radio, supervising a convoy to Fort Knox (Kentucky), and having jungle training. He describes going overseas aboard the SS Louise Lykes as the equipment escort and, after fixing their hydraulic hatch cover, teaching hydraulics lessons to the sailors every morning. He details his duties with the 3rd Ordnance Company at Long Binh (Vietnam) doing maintenance and loading ammunition onto trucks and helicopter cargo nets. Rowsam reflects on living in tents, sneakily building a brick building for the unit during the night, switching paperwork during an impromptu inspection, nearly getting in trouble when his men were caught playing horseshoes instead of working, and controversy over a "stolen" grader. He highlights the competence and ingenuity of his unit. He speaks about visiting with the crew of the SS Louise Lykes and giving them a pallet of beer he'd discovered addressed to the Marines and camouflaged as soap. Rowsam tells of rocket attacks, a Viet Cong attempt to infiltrate the camp, and discovering a spider hole near the motor pool. He describes recurring problems with malaria. After his enlistment was up, Rowsam touches on having trouble finding all his paperwork, doing special projects at Fort McCoy, and recording the history of the 826th Ordnance Company
Oral history interview with Kenneth C. Ossmann by Kenneth C Ossmann( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Kenneth Ossmann, a Janesville, Wisconsin native, discusses his World War II service with the Air Corps as a pilot with the 16th Bomb Group, 20th Air Force in the Pacific Theater
Oral history interview with Thomas R. Murdock by Thomas R Murdock( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

James Murdock, a Westfield (Wisconsin) veteran, discusses his Vietnam War service with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division and provides in-depth discussion of several operations in which he participated. He describes enlisting in the Marines, practicing amphibious landings at Okinawa, and being sent to Chu Lai (Vietnam). He describes Operation Star Light where his unit was on a search and destroy mission for Viet Cong units, ammunition, and food supplies. Murdock relates information about Operation Utah including helicopter landings in a rice paddy, night survival techniques while waiting for artillery support, sniper attacks, and receiving the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry for successfully marking targets. He comments on Operation Indiana, the differences between training and combat, taking prisoners, booby traps laid by the Viet Cong, and the resourcefulness of Viet Cong soldiers. Murdock discusses Operation Black Ferret where journalist Dickey Chapelle was with his platoon. He compares Chapelle's actions while marching in the jungle to those of a top sergeant and mentions the booby trap that killed her. Murdock returned to Vietnam after an emergency leave, and touches upon training replacements on the use of the 3.5 rocket launcher, promotion to corporal, and discharge from the service
Oral history interview with Roman J. Wehrle by Roman J Wehrle( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Roman "Bud" Wehrle, a Madison, Wisconsin native, discusses his World War II service with the 4th Battalion, 301st Ammunition Supply Company in North Africa and Europe. He details enlisting in the Army, training at Camp Sutton (North Carolina), learning safety measures for handling and transferring ordnance, and learning to set up ammunition depots. He describes how General Motors and Buick employees recruited people into ordnance. Wehrle describes the different types of ammunition his unit was responsible for and establishing ammunition depots at Bone and Oran (North Africa). He briefly discusses the 301st Ammunition Supply Company and the Arab and Italian workers it hired. He describes how the ammunition was shipped in color-coded, water-proof boxes or cans. Wehrle mentions a situation where some poison gas shells were accidentally sent to the front lines, but were not used. He discusses interacting with the local Arab population, and he mentions writing the letter home to the wife of a soldier who "shacked up" with a local woman who was a "little too much for him" and who died of a heart attack. Promoted to sergeant, he describes how his responsibilities and privileges changed. Transferred to Europe, Wehrle comments on establishing depots in Southern France using the labor of German and Italian prisoners of war. He claims, in Italy, mud was a problem and one tractor "tragically sunk out of sight." He details the food situation in Africa and France, saying the food the soldiers ate was practically the same food the POWs ate. Wehrle talks about local kids getting scars on their faces from licking the last bits of food out of C-ration cans, and describes trading gallons of butter for chickens. He emphasizes that prisoners of war could not be forced to work, but were enticed by promises of better food. Wehrle mentions that there were two types of Germans--the drafted soldiers who were good to work with, and the followers of Hitler who would not work. He touches on correspondence occurring between his wife and wives of English soldiers. He briefly talks about being commissioned into a segregated African-American unit in North Africa. Wehrle describes several Midwest soldiers who were caught in an ocean riptide and drowned, and not being able to do anything to help them. One soldier watched his friend get pulled out to sea and then committed suicide with a grenade. Wehrle relates his preparations for Japan, but then he was sent home on a liberty ship. He describes returning to the job he had before entering the service, paying VFW dues, and meeting his two-and-a-half-year-old daughter after being discharged
Oral history interview with Lawrence Holley by Lawrence Holley( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lawrence Holley, a Blue Mounds, Wisconsin native, discusses his World War II service as a member of the clerical staff with the Air Force. Drafted in 1943, Holley talks about basic training at Greensboro (North Carolina), Air Force school at Greeley (Colorado), and assignment to the Air Force statistical section at Pratt Army Airfield Base (Kansas). Shipped overseas in 1944, he comments on stopping in Casablanca, being stationed at a B-29 base in Chakulia (India), and joining the 58th Bomber Wing of the 40th Bomb Group. Holley addresses problems with the B-29 and describes the aerial operations based in Chakulia. Holley mentions his role in the administrative section inventorying parts and gathering reports. He speaks of hiring Indian kids to take care of the barracks, food quality, and beer rations. Holley describes an incident on the base when some bombs exploded while being unloaded. He talks about missing a chance to fly in a B-29 because he was hospitalized with an illness. Holley touches upon being stationed at Tinian Island as chief of the statistical section, learning the war had ended, and seeing the base empty as people and supplies were sent home. He recalls enjoying the music on Tokyo Rose's broadcasts, seeing singer Lily Pons at a USO show in India, attending 40th Bomb Group reunions, and using the GI Bill to attend the University of Wisconsin
Oral history interview with John W. Philipps by John W Philipps( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

John W. Philipps, a Lancaster, Wisconsin native, discusses his World War II service as an Air Force mechanic and gunner with the 453rd Bomb Group. Philipps mentions basic training at Jefferson Barracks (Missouri) and airplane mechanic school in Illinois. He talks about the kinds of airplanes he worked with at mechanic training at Hamilton Field (California), aerial gunnery school at Las Vegas (Nevada), and assignment to a B-24 crew at March Field (California). Philipps comments on his long flight to RAF Old Buckenham Airfield (England), problems caused by bad weather during missions into occupied France and Germany, opposition from antiaircraft and enemy fighter planes, and shrapnel damage. He addresses food, flight equipment, taking shelter from the Blitz while on leave in London, and going to Edinburgh on leave. Philipps tells of having an engine shot out during a mission to bomb an oil refinery in Politz (Germany). He touches upon working as a classroom instructor in Ireland, being shipped back to the United States in 1944, and getting married before transferring to Truax Field (Madison), where he worked in a supply room. After being discharged, Philipps mentions becoming a member of the VFW and the American Legion, and he talks about his civilian career
Oral history interview with Norman Alff by Norman A Alff( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Norman Alff, a Columbus, Wisconsin native, discusses his World War II service as a communications man in North Africa and Italy with Company K, 362nd Division, 91st Infantry, and his post-war involvement with the ROTC program at the University of Wisconsin. He talks about basic training at Camp White (Oregon) and his role stringing telephone wire and carrying communication equipment like the SCR-300 radio. Alff relates transportation to Africa, practice landing operations in North Africa, and training to fire a bazooka. Stationed at Arno (Italy), he comments on combat conditions including being under mortar and artillery fire, night patrols, and rest and relaxation in Tuscany. He relates the disappearance of a nearby squad, and later discovering they had been captured by Germans. Alff mentions crossing the Arno River, establishing outposts in the North Apennines Mountains, and being wounded by two "shoe mines" while trying to help a medic who had been wounded by a mine. Wounded in the legs and face, he discusses medical treatment in Rome and later receiving treatment for jaundice in Naples (Italy). He comments on occupation duty in Gorizia (Italy) and touchy relations there with Yugoslavian troops. Alff mentions seeing the Isle of Capri before coming home and discusses his role as the ROTC Regimental Executive Officer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He talks about majoring in international relations, working at General Motors, keeping in touch with a few other veterans, and revisiting Italy with his wife
Oral history interview with Melvin H. Rickard by Melvin H Rickard( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Melvin Rickard, a Linden, Wisconsin native, discusses his World War II service with the glider unit of the 81st Anti Aircraft Battalion, 101st Airborne Division; he focuses his discussion on the D-Day landing, Operation Market Garden, and his experiences as a prisoner of war. Rickard talks about basic training at Fort Bragg (North Carolina), assignment to a glider unit, the differences between American and English gliders, and training in England in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. He describes the D-Day invasion including Utah Beach landing, taking cover from German aircraft fire, moving inland to take the town of Carentan (France), protecting a bridge under heavy artillery fire, and a close call when a friend was killed. After a furlough in Cornwall (England), Rickard details Operation Market Garden in Holland, including hearing German soldiers talking in the woods, guard duty at night, lack of food because supplies were intercepted by the Germans, hearing the German attack approach, and being unable to communicate with other American and British troops. He tells of surrendering with other American troops, staying with other prisoners of war at a Dutch farm, a visit by German propaganda broadcaster Axis Sally (Mildred Gillars), the packed boxcar ride to Stalag 2B, and interrogation. He touches upon his stay in a German prison including receiving Red Cross packages, exchanging cigarettes for bread and vegetables with the prison guards, having yellow jaundice and an ulcerated tooth, and marching through a blizzard with inadequate shoes as the Russian troops approached. Marching for two and a half months, Rickard recalls the cold, sleeping in barns, becoming familiar with some German civilians, stealing potatoes, and suffering from a bad back and frozen feet. He highlights the importance of Colonel Wallace, a fellow prisoner of war who kept him going. Rickard mentions arriving at Stalag 2A a week before the Russians arrived and the prisoners' decision to stay behind. After liberation, he talks about leaving the camp, scavenging for food and alcohol, and having two Russian soldiers rob him of his wristwatch. After delousing, he remembers being shipped to Camp Lucky Strike (France) and having lunch with General Eisenhower. Rickard mentions playing ping pong at an Army hospital in Macon (Georgia), waiting for enough points to be discharged, and joining the American Legion and Disabled American Veterans. He describes a couple coincidences from his service time, his career afterwards, and his efforts trying to get in touch with his POW friend
 
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Wisconsin at war
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English (25)

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