WorldCat Identities

Durrant, Sam 1970-

Overview
Works: 12 works in 63 publications in 1 language and 3,812 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Contributor, Creator
Classifications: PR9369.3.C58, 813.5409358
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Sam Durrant
Postcolonial narrative and the work of mourning : J.M. Coetzee, Wilson Harris, and Toni Morrison by Sam Durrant( )

19 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 1,900 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Sam Durrant's book compares the ways in which the novels of J.M. Coetzee, Wilson Harris, and Toni Morrison memorialize the traumatic histories of racial oppression that continue to haunt our postcolonial era. The works examined bear witness to the colonialization of the New World, U.S. slavery, and South African apartheid, histories founded on a violent denial of the humanity of the other that had traumatic consequences for both perpetrators and victims. Working at the borders of psychoanalysis and deconstruction, and drawing inspiration from recent work on the Holocaust, Durrant rethinks Freud's opposition between mourning and melancholia at the level of the collective and rearticulates the postcolonial project and an inconsolable labor of remembrance."--Jacket
Essays in migratory aesthetics : cultural practices between migration and art-making by Sam Durrant( )

14 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1,553 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume addresses the impact of human movement on the aesthetic practices that make up the fabric of culture. The essays explore the ways in which cultural activities-ranging from the habitual gestures of the body to the production of specific artworks-register the impact of migration, from the forced transportation of slaves to the New World and of Jews to the death camps to the economic migration of peoples between the West and its erstwhile colonies; from the internal and external exile of Palestinians to the free movement of cosmopolitan intellectuals. Rather than focusing exclusively on art produced by those identified as migrant subjects, this collection opens up the question of how aesthetics itself migrates, transforming not only its own practices and traditions, but also the very nature of our being in the world, as subjects producing, as well as produced by, the cultures in which we live. The transformative potential of cultures on the move is both affirmed and critiqued throughout the collection, as part of an exploration of the ways in which globalisation implicates us ever more tightly in the unequal relations of production that characterise late modernity. This collection brings academic scholars from a variety of disciplines into conversation with practising visual and verbal artists; indeed, many of the essays break down the distinction between artist and academic, suggesting a dynamic interchange between critical reflection and creativity
The future of trauma theory : contemporary literary and cultural criticism by Gert Buelens( Book )

16 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 334 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This collection analyses the future of 'trauma theory', a major theoretical discourse in contemporary criticism and theory. The chapters advance the current state of the field by exploring new areas, asking new questions and making new connections. Part one, History and Culture, begins by developing trauma theory in its more familiar post-deconstructive mode and explores how these insights might still be productive. It goes on, via a critique of existing positions, to relocate trauma theory in a postcolonial and globalized world, theoretically, aesthetically and materially, and focuses on non-Western accounts and understandings of trauma, memory and suffering. Part two, Politics and Subjectivity, turns explicitly to politics and subjectivity, focussing on the state and the various forms of subjection to which it gives rise, and on human rights, biopolitics and community. Each chapter, in different ways, advocates a movement beyond the sort of texts and concepts that are the usual focus for trauma criticism and moves this dynamic network of ideas forward. With contributions from an international selection of leading critics and thinkers from the US and Europe, this volume will be a key critical intervention in one of the most important areas in contemporary literary criticism and theory.--Back cover
Postapartheid literature : mourning and the reinvention of community by Sam Durrant( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Some kind of tomorrow" : postcolonial narrative and the work of mourning by Sam Durrant( Book )

4 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Postapartheid narratives. Reconciliation and its discontents by Sam Durrant( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book explores the ways in which postapartheid literature reinvents South African mourning traditions. During the apartheid era, politics exerted a particular pressure on both funerary practices and on literature, both of which were instrumentalised as weapons in the struggle: just as funerals were turned into mass political protests, literature was pressed into service as protest literature. In the postapartheid era, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (1996-99) continued to press mourning into political service, particularly through the Human Rights Violations hearings in which private losses were mourned in public and immediately subsumed within a national narrative of forgiveness and reconciliation. Despite calls for the recovery of artistic freedom and literary autonomy, literature has also been subject to political pressure; writers have been expected to follow the TRC’s lead and produce a literature of national reconciliation. While a literature of reconciliation might appear to allow for more imaginative possibilities than protest literature, it is still driven by a particular politics of memory. Durrant explores the ways in which postapartheid literature has acceded to and/or resisted this politics of memory and asks what literary resistance might mean in a postapartheid context. Is it the task of literature to produce a counter-politics of memory, or is it rather to resist the demands of the political per se, to refuse to be instrumentalised in any cause?
Creaturely mimesis : life after necropolitics in Chris Abani's Song for night by Sam Durrant( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ancestral trauma, animist poetics : African literature's regenerative death drive by Ryan David Topper( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Creaturely forms : encounters with animality in W.G. Sebald, J.M. Coetzee and Mahasweta Devi by Dominic Edward O'Key( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

J.M. Coetzee, Elizabeth Costello, and the limits of the sympathetic imagination by Sam Durrant( )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Postcolonial Narrative and the Work of Mourning: J.M. Coetzee, Wilson Harris, and Toni Morrison (SUNY series, explorations in postcolonial studies) by Sam Durrant( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Future of Trauma Theory( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Postcolonial narrative and the work of mourning : J.M. Coetzee, Wilson Harris, and Toni Morrison
Covers
Essays in migratory aesthetics : cultural practices between migration and art-making
Languages
English (62)