WorldCat Identities

Kosec, Katrina

Overview
Works: 17 works in 39 publications in 1 language and 735 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Author, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Katrina Kosec
Early child education : making programs work for Brazil's most important generation by David Evans( )

7 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 463 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the past fifteen years, Brazil has made great strides in increasing its population's access to early child education, with both preschool and creche enrollment increasing by over fifty percent. Education programs for young children have consistently been shown to have long-term positive effects on life outcomes of participants. In Brazil, these programs have demonstrated positive impacts on, for example, income, length of schooling, and test scores. However, the quality of pre-schools and creches is essential in achieving these improvements, and even in capital cities, very few centers are rated as high-quality centers. Representation of the poorest and most vulnerable children among those attending pre-school and creche still lags considerably behind that of more privileged children, although poorer children stand to gain the most from early child education programs. Additionally, large rural-urban and regional disparities exist. This book details the literature on the effects of early child education and the importance of quality, and gives a comprehensive view of the quality, regional, and socioeconomic gaps in early child education in Brazil. It further examines existing public and private initiatives in Brazil, and discusses how they can be leveraged to effectively and efficiently provide quality pre-school and creche care. A central aim of the book is to provide policymakers with specific recommendations of policies to improve the quality and equity of the early child education experience in Brazil. Given the difficulty in reaching children in remote areas and the need to expand coverage to the poorest segments of the population, Brazil will need to be strategic in how and where it invests. It should target new centers and allocate existing spaces to the poorest people and areas. Municipal policymakers should allocate public spaces in a transparent manner, provide guidelines to institutions, and monitor them. Teachers need guidance on the best activities to use, to improve child outcomes. The use of participatory budgeting could potentially improve access and equity by involving the poor directly in the budgeting process. Increased cross-sectoral coordination could improve child welfare in cost-effective ways, and public-private partnerships could stretch existing resources further and expand coverage more quickly
Has private participation in water and sewerage improved coverage? : empirical evidence from Latin America by George Clarke( )

9 editions published between 2004 and 2009 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: "Introducing private sector participation (PSP) into the water and sewerage sectors in developing countries is difficult and controversial. Empirical studies on its effects are scant and generally inconclusive. Case studies tend to find improvements in the sector following privatization, but they suffer from selection bias and it is difficult to generalize their results. To explore empirically the effects of PSP on coverage, Clarke, Kosec, and Wallsten assemble a new dataset of connections to water and sewerage services at the city and province level based on household surveys in Argentina, Bolivia, and Brazil. The household surveys, conducted over a number of years, allow them to compile data before and after the introduction of PSP, as well as from similar (control) regions that never privatized at all. Their analysis reveals that, in general, connection rates to piped water and sewerage improved following the introduction of PSP, consistent with the case study literature. The authors also find, however, that connection rates similarly improved in the control regions, suggesting that PSP may not have been responsible for those improvements. On the other hand, connection rates for the poorest households also tended to increase in the regions with PSP and in the control regions, suggesting that--in terms of connections at least--PSP did not harm the poor. This paper--a product of the Growth and Investment Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to study the impact of infrastructure reform on poor households"--World Bank web site
Politics and preschool : the political economy of investment in pre-primary education by Katrina Kosec( )

4 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What drives governments with similar revenues to publicly provide very different amounts of goods for which private substitutes are available? Key examples are education and health care. This paper compares spending by Brazilian municipalities on pre-primary education -- a good that is also provided privately -- with spending on public infrastructure like parks and roads, which lacks private substitutes. Panel data from 1995-2008 reveal how the distribution of income affects public investment. Revenue is endogenous to investment outcomes, and the analysis addresses this problem by exploiting a 1998, nationwide education finance reform and several revisions to the policy. The author constructs a variable that captures exogenous variation in revenue generated by nonlinearities of the law to instrument for observed revenue. Municipalities with higher median income and more inequality are less likely to allocate revenue to education or to expand pre-primary enrollment. They are more likely to allocate revenue to public infrastructure. There is suggestive evidence that this occurs for two reasons, hypothesized in two separate literatures. In rich and unequal municipalities, fewer total people support public education spending (the collective choice channel), and also, any given poor person wanting public education has less influence over policymakers there (the political power channel)
Community-based conditional cash transfers in Tanzania : results from a randomized trial by David K Evans( Book )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Executive Summary; Figures; Figure ES. 1 How Do the Study Population and the Rest of the Country Compare?; Figure ES. 2 How Large Were the Bimonthly Payments to the Families?; Tables; Table ES. 1 What Were the Conditions that Households Needed to Meet?; Figure ES. 3 Impact Evaluation Design; Figure ES. 4 How Similar Were the Treatment and Comparison Households before the Program?; Figure ES. 5 How Much Less Sick Were Members of Treatment Households Relative to Members of Households in the Comparison Group?
Has private participation in water and sewerage improved coverage? : empirical evidence from Latin America by George Clarke( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Introducing private sector participation (PSP) into the water and sewerage sectors in developing countries is difficult and controversial. Empirical studies on its effects are scant and generally inconclusive. Case studies tend to find improvements in the sector following privatization, but they suffer from selection bias and it is difficult to generalize their results. To explore empirically the effects of PSP on coverage, Clarke, Kosec, and Wallsten assemble a new dataset of connections to water and sewerage services at the city and province level based on household surveys in Argentina, Bolivia, and Brazil. The household surveys, conducted over a number of years, allow them to compile data before and after the introduction of PSP, as well as from similar (control) regions that never privatized at all. Their analysis reveals that, in general, connection rates to piped water and sewerage improved following the introduction of PSP, consistent with the case study literature. The authors also find, however, that connection rates similarly improved in the control regions, suggesting that PSP may not have been responsible for those improvements. On the other hand, connection rates for the poorest households also tended to increase in the regions with PSP and in the control regions, suggesting that--in terms of connections at least--PSP did not harm the poor. This paper--a product of the Growth and Investment Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to study the impact of infrastructure reform on poor households"--World Bank web site
Politics and Preschool: The Political Economy of Investment in Pre-Primary Education. Policy Research Working Paper 5647 by Katrina Kosec( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What drives governments with similar revenues to publicly provide very different amounts of goods for which private substitutes are available? Key examples are education and health care. This paper compares spending by Brazilian municipalities on pre-primary education--a good that is also provided privately--with spending on public infrastructure like parks and roads, which lacks private substitutes. Panel data from 1995-2008 reveal how the distribution of income affects public investment. Revenue is endogenous to investment outcomes, and the analysis addresses this problem by exploiting a 1998, nationwide education finance reform and several revisions to the policy. The author constructs a variable that captures exogenous variation in revenue generated by nonlinearities of the law to instrument for observed revenue. Municipalities with higher median income and more inequality are less likely to allocate revenue to education or to expand pre-primary enrollment. They are more likely to allocate revenue to public infrastructure. There is suggestive evidence that this occurs for two reasons, hypothesized in two separate literatures. In rich and unequal municipalities, fewer total people support public education spending (the collective choice channel), and also, any given poor person wanting public education has less influence over policymakers there (the political power channel). Appendices include: (1) Appendix Tables; (2) Institutional Detail: Pre-Primary Education in Brazil, fundef, and fundeb; (3) Mathematical Appendix; and (4) Construction of Simulated Instrumental Variables. (Contains 15 tables, 5 figures and 45 footnotes.)
Has Private Participation in Water and Sewerage Improved Coverage? Empirical Evidence from Latin America by Scott Wallsten( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introducing private sector participation (PSP) into the water and sewerage sectors in developing countries is difficult and controversial. Empirical studies on its effects are scant and generally inconclusive. Case studies tend to find improvements in the sector following privatization, but they suffer from selection bias, and it is difficult to generalize from their results. To explore empirically the effects of PSP on coverage, we assemble a new dataset of connections to water and sewerage services at the city, and province level, based on household surveys in Argentina, Bolivia, and Brazil. The household surveys, conducted over a number of years, allow us to compile data, before and after the introduction of PSP, as well as from similar (control) regions that never privatized at all. Our analysis reveals that, in general, connection rates to piped water and sewerage, improved following the introduction of PSP, consistent with the case study literature. We also find, however, that connection rates similarly improved in the control regions, suggesting that PSP, per se, may not have been responsible for those improvements. On the other hand, connection rates for the poorest households also tended to increase in the regions with PSP, and in the control regions, suggesting that-in terms of connections at least-PSP did not harm the poor
Federal competition and economic growth by John William Hatfield( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What does regulatory impact assessment mean in Europe by Claudio M Radaelli( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) has emerged on the European political agenda. It is an idea whose time has come. Both the member states and the institutions of the European Union (EU) are presently investing in programmes for 'better regulation' and 'good regulatory governance'. RIA is the cornerstone of these programmes. This paper explains how RIA is being diffused in Europe. Is the introduction of RIA in Europe simply the diffusion of an idea, the content of which remains very different in various national contexts? Or, alternatively, has the diffusion of ideas brought about convergence at the level of how RIA is performed? As shown by Hahn and Litan (2004), European impact assessments are often different from North-American RIAs. This paper shows that the adoption of a common RIA 'bottle' has not produced similar European 'wines.' The language of RIA has produced a community of discourse for policy-makers and has stimulated the introduction of some instruments that are similarly labelled 'impact assessment'. But RIA practice may exist only on paper, and in some cases the 'RIA label' may reveal basic assessments of administrative burdens. The paper explains how ideas can be diffused without convergence of results. The argument here is not the trivial one that 'context matters', but how it matters. Hence the paper breaks down 'context' into four dimensions, that is, institutions, models of the policy process, actors, and legitimacy. Institutional design, the capacity to deal with distributional problems, heterogeneity in multi-level governance systems, policy styles, and the 'weights' given to the preferences of different RIA actors explain the lack of convergence
The effects of political competition on rural land evidence from Pakistan( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Temporary and permanent migrant selection : theory and evidence of ability-search cost dynamics by Joyce J Chen( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The migrant selection literature concentrates primarily on spatial patterns. This paper illustrates the implications of migration duration for patterns of selection by integrating two workhorses of the labor literature, a search model and a Roy model. Theory and empirics show temporary migrants are intermediately selected on education, with weaker selection on cognitive ability. Longer migration episodes lead to stronger positive selection on both education and ability, as its associated jobs involve finer employee-employer matching and offer greater returns to experience. Networks are more valuable for permanent migration, where search costs are higher. Labor market frictions explain observed complex network-skill interactions
The child health implications of privatizing the urban water supply in Africa by Katrina Kosec( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Can private sector participation (PSP) in the urban piped water sector improve child health? Allowing the private sector to provide basic infrastructure such as piped water is politically controversial, with some arguing that the private sector is more efficient and will improve access and quality, and others arguing that access and quality will suffer. This paper uses child-level data from 39 African countries during 1986-2010 to shed light on this question. A fixed effects analysis suggests that the introduction of PSP decreases diarrhea among under-five children by between 2.2 and 2.6 percentage points, or 14-16%. An instrumental variables analysis that uses variation in the share of the world water market controlled by former colonizing countries suggests that the effects are twice as large. The difference between the OLS and the IV results can be explained by the fact that PSP is more likely when the water sector is distressed and causing health problems. Importantly, PSP appears to benefit the health of children from the poorest households the most. PSP in water also leads to higher rates of reliance on piped water as the primary water source, which is a likely channel explaining child health improvements
Has private participation in water and sewerage improved coverage? : empirical evidence from Latin America by George Clarke( Recording )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Introducing private sector participation (PSP) into the water and sewerage sectors in developing countries is difficult and controversial. Empirical studies on its effects are scant and generally inconclusive. Case studies tend to find improvements in the sector following privatization, but they suffer from selection bias and it is difficult to generalize their results. To explore empirically the effects of PSP on coverage, Clarke, Kosec, and Wallsten assemble a new dataset of connections to water and sewerage services at the city and province level based on household surveys in Argentina, Bolivia, and Brazil. The household surveys, conducted over a number of years, allow them to compile data before and after the introduction of PSP, as well as from similar (control) regions that never privatized at all. Their analysis reveals that, in general, connection rates to piped water and sewerage improved following the introduction of PSP, consistent with the case study literature. The authors also find, however, that connection rates similarly improved in the control regions, suggesting that PSP may not have been responsible for those improvements. On the other hand, connection rates for the poorest households also tended to increase in the regions with PSP and in the control regions, suggesting that--in terms of connections at least--PSP did not harm the poor. This paper--a product of the Growth and Investment Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to study the impact of infrastructure reform on poor households"--World Bank web site
World Bank Studies : Early Child Education : Making Programs Work for Brazil's Most Important Generation by David Evans( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Federal competition and economic growth by John William Hatfield( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The child health implications of privatizing Africa's urban water supply by Katrina Kosec( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Public or private drinking water? : the effects of ownership and benchmark competition on U.S. water system regulatory compliance and household water expenditures by Scott J Wallsten( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.42 (from 0.28 for Early chil ... to 0.97 for World Bank ...)

Alternative Names
Katrina Kosec researcher ORCID ID = 0000-0002-5126-5215

Languages
English (39)