WorldCat Identities

Zavota, Gina

Overview
Works: 16 works in 62 publications in 1 language and 169 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Academic theses 
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: B3279.H94, 193
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Gina Zavota
Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers( Book )

19 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 84 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Edmund Husserl was the founding father of phenomenology and one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. This will make available the very best essays on Husserl's thought from the past seventy years
Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers( Book )

8 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers( Book )

9 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Edmund Husserl was the founding father of phenomenology and one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. This will make available the very best essays on Husserl's thought from the past seventy years
Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers( Book )

7 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Edmund Husserl was the founding father of phenomenology and one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. This will make available the very best essays on Husserl's thought from the past seventy years
Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers( Book )

8 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Edmund Husserl was the founding father of phenomenology and one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. This will make available the very best essays on Husserl's thought from the past seventy years
The web of meaning : language, noema and subjectivity and intersubjectivity( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Cutting Edge : phenomenological method, philosophical logic, ontology and philosophy of science( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Circumscriptions : Classic Essays on Husserl's Phenomenology( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Horizons : life-world, ethics, history and metaphysics( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The topos of time : Plotinus's metaphysics of time as a phenomenology by Gina Zavota( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The nexus of phenomena : intentionalitiy, perception and temporality( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Art as negation : a defense of conceptual art as art by Kristin Kathleen Weis( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

From its precursors in the 1950s and 1960s to its full emergence on the art scene in the 1970s, conceptual art has been met with controversy, criticism, and disgust. Conceptual art challenges the very notions that many people hold about art - namely, that art must be beautiful, visual, and arise within the viewer some kind of aesthetic emotion. Many aesthetic theories proposed by philosophers such as Kant, Dewey, and Greenberg only reinforce these ideas, thus relegating conceptual art to categories such as the "vulgar" and "mundane." Other theories offer a more inclusive definition of art that create a space for conceptual art in the art world. In this paper, I will be examining both definitions of art that exclude conceptual art and those that include it. I will ultimately argue for why conceptual art should be considered art and why a more inclusive definition of art that includes conceptual art is preferable to one that does not
Schelling, Heidegger, and Evil by Devon Hawkins( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

My project is to establish a secularized concept of evil by filtering F.W.J. Schelling's philosophy through that of Martin Heidegger. Schelling's philosophy is essential to my project, because he seeks to claim a positive ontological status for evil, as do I. Schelling's evil, despite its religious context, is not mired in concepts of malformation, or even original sin, as is the evil of his predecessors. I offer Aristotle and Immanuel Kant as Schelling's key secular predecessors, in whose philosophies we find the beginnings of Schelling's free-will theodicy. Similarly, Schelling stands apart from modern theodicy-that is, from G.W. Leibniz, who coined the term "theodicy"-in three key ways: Schelling focuses on human beings, rather than on God; he embraces nature, rather than seeking to overcome it, which requires that he also embrace chaos; and he insists that evil has a positive ontological status, rather than a negative one. These departures show the influence of both Kant and Aristotle on Schelling's conception of evil. Over the course of this project, we will find that when we uncover evil's positive ontology and lay bare its actualization by humans, we ground an approach to evil suited to the political necessities of the twenty-first century. That is, we see that a proper philosophical understanding of evil necessarily calls us to a political address of the same. What the evils of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have shown us, especially, is that a stronger, positive conception of evil enables us to assign accountability more effectively to those who commit evil acts. Hence, crafting a positive conception of evil outside of a theological framework will necessitate a moral framework. To that end, I engage the philosophies of Friedrich Nietzsche and Hannah Arendt in order to make clear the implications of an ontologically positive evil and draw conclusions regarding the best concept of evil for a contemporary context. My view is that the best concept of evil must combine perpetrator, victim, and by-stander approaches. Such a combination approach will allow us to not only promote good, but also prevent evil
Edmund Husserl( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Perfect and imperfect character in Plato and Derrida : a distinction with respect to "universals" and its relevance for feminist thought by Matthew Veneklase( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This paper attempts to develop and apply two contrary concepts, referred to as perfect character and imperfect character. Both have to do with a very broadly construed notion of universals, wherein a universal is anything predicable of more than one other thing. The point of this definition is exclude particulars, or individuals, and thereby limit the scope of inquiry, while also avoiding traditional disputes over the metaphysical reality or non-reality of universals. The concept of perfect character is drawn from relevant works of Plato, and is hypothesized to be the usual way in which universals are understood. That of imperfect character is drawn largely from relevant works of Jacques Derrida, although those of Martin Heidegger and Ludwig Wittgenstein are considered as well. In developing these concepts, a certain amount of logical analysis is employed, although the limits of such analysis are also made clear. An attempt is then made to show the relevance of this distinction for feminist philosophy, in particular with respect to concerns that contemporary constructions of femininity function oppressively. To this end, works by several feminist thinkers are consulted, an article by Sandra Lee Bartky providing the focal point. The basic conclusion is that to understand femininity as having imperfect, rather than perfect, character, would undermine any oppressive functions of current constructions of femininity. The relevance to other feminist concerns of the distinction between perfect and imperfect character is also indicated. Besides feminist thought, this distinction should also be relevant to other inquiries, such as those concerning race and racism, post-colonial thinking, justice, and ecological concerns
Phenomenology, imagination, and aesthetic experience by Ryan Ausperk( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The objective of this thesis is to give a phenomenological account of the relationship between imagination and aesthetic experience. To begin, I give a preliminary sketch of some monumental figures in the area of aesthetics that have influenced phenomenological reflection on art. I then use the philosophy of Mikel Dufrenne to provide the basis of a phenomenological aesthetics, emphasizing the distinction between the work of art and the aesthetic object as well as providing an account of the structure of aesthetic experience. I then turn to Edward Casey's analysis of imagination to argue that the relationship between aesthetic experience and imagination is mutually beneficial. Finally, I apply this line of reasoning to the art of photography to give an example of the reciprocal relationship between imagination and aesthetic experience
 
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Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers Edmund Husserl : critical assessments of leading philosophers Edmund Husserl
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Languages
English (62)