WorldCat Identities

Willis, Henry H.

Overview
Works: 34 works in 132 publications in 1 language and 14,513 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HV6432, 363.320973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Henry H Willis
Estimating terrorism risk by Henry H Willis( )

13 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 2,276 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for protecting the United States from terrorism. It achieves this goal partly through the Urban Areas Security Initiative, which allocates resources to states and urban areas. Until DHS can know the effectiveness of available risk-reduction alternatives or determine reasonable minimum standards for community preparedness, allocating homeland security resources based on risk is the next best approach; areas at higher risk are likely to have more and larger opportunities for risk reduction than areas at lower risk. This monograph offers a method for constructing an estimate of city risk shares, designed to perform well across a wide range of threat scenarios and risk types. It also proposes and demonstrates a framework for comparing the performance of alternative risk estimates given uncertainty in measuring the elements of risk. Finally, it makes five recommendations for improving the allocation of homeland security resources: DHS should consistently define terrorism risk in terms of expected annual consequences; DHS should seek robust risk estimators that account for uncertainty about terrorism risk and variance in citizen values; DHS should develop event-based models of terrorism risk; until reliable event-based models are constructed, DHS should use density-weighted population rather than population as a simple risk indicator; and DHS should fund research to bridge the gap between terrorism risk assessment and resource allocation policies that are cost-effective
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations by Brian A Jackson( )

9 editions published between 2010 and 2014 in English and held by 1,964 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ability to measure emergency preparedness - to predict the likely performance of emergency response systems in future events - is critical for policy analysis in homeland security. Yet it remains difficult to know how prepared a response system is to deal with large-scale incidents, whether it be a natural disaster, terrorist attack, or industrial or transportation accident. This research draws on the fields of systems analysis and engineering to apply the concept of system reliability to the evaluation of emergency response systems. The authors describe a method for modeling an emergency response system; identifying how individual parts of the system might fail; and assessing the likelihood of each failure and the severity of its effects on the overall response effort. The authors walk the reader through two applications of this method: a simplified example in which responders must deliver medical treatment to a certain number of people in a specified time window, and a more complex scenario involving the release of chlorine gas. The authors also describe an exploratory analysis in which they parsed a set of after-action reports describing real-world incidents, to demonstrate how this method can be used to quantitatively analyze data on past response performance. The authors conclude with a discussion of how this method of measuring emergency response system reliability could inform policy discussion of emergency preparedness, how system reliability might be improved, and the costs of doing so. --From publisher description
Measuring the effectiveness of border security between ports-of-entry by Henry H Willis( )

8 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1,956 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Strategic planning is necessary if the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is to carry out its border-security missions effectively and efficiently. As part of that, DHS leadership must define concrete and sensible objectives and measures of success. These can be used to assess results along the way, to guide allocation of resources, and to inform programming and budgeting for future capabilities and functions. This report offers research and recommendations on ways to measure the overall efforts of the national border-security enterprise between ports of entry. To be meaningful, the set of measures for effectiveness of border security should be sound, reliable, useful, and general. Three DHS missions appear to currently be of special interest to DHS leadership because they are especially problematic: illegal drug control, counterterrorism, and illegal migration. The report recommends measuring performance of three fundamental functions that border-security efforts contribute to achieving national policy objectives: interdiction, deterrence, and exploiting networked intelligence. If the steps described here are taken, DHS and its components will be in a better position to discuss past performance and to provide reasoned justifications for future allocation of resources. Further, they will be able to relate their efforts to those of other agencies in pursuit of national objectives
The state of U.S. railroads : a review of capacity and performance data by Brian Weatherford( )

8 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,623 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. railroads have improved their productivity, but increasing freightvolume threatens performance-degrading capacity constraints. This reportdescribes the current state of railroad capacity and performance for freighttransportation. The public consequences of private investment decisionsjustify a public role in addressing concerns about railroads, but betterdata and analysis are needed to inform transportation policymaking
Protecting emergency responders( )

8 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 1,251 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This monograph serves as a technical source for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) incident commander guidelines for emergency response immediately following large structural collapse events. It characterizes response activities and expected hazards, and develops guidelines for selecting appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). -- Pg. 4 of cover
Capabilities-based planning for energy security at Department of Defense installations by Constantine Samaras( )

10 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 1,006 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Department of Defense (DoD) installations rely on the commercial electricity grid for 99 percent of their electricity needs, but extensive energy delivery outages in 2012 have reinforced that the U.S. electricity grid is vulnerable to disruptions from natural hazards and actor-induced outages, such as physical or cyber attacks. In the event of a catastrophic disaster⁰́₄such as a severe hurricane, massive earthquake, or large-scale terrorist attack⁰́₄DoD installations would also serve as a base for emergency services. To enhance energy security, DoD has identified diversifying energy sources and increasing efficiency in DoD operations as critical goals. But how to enhance energy security across the portfolio of installations is not clear and several questions remain unanswered: Energy security for how long? Under what conditions? At what cost? The underlying analytical questions are, what critical capabilities do U.S. installations provide, and how can DoD maintain these capabilities during an energy services disruption in the most cost-effective manner? Answering these questions requires a systems approach that incorporates technological, economic, and operational uncertainties. Using portfolio analysis methods for assessing capability options, this paper presents a framework to evaluate choices among energy security strategies for DoD installations. This framework evaluates whether existing or proposed installation energy security strategies enhance DoD capabilities and evaluates strategy cost-effectiveness
Protecting Emergency Responders, Volume 4 : Personal Protective Equipment Guidelines for Structural Collapse Events by Henry H Willis( )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 764 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This monograph serves as a technical source for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) incident commander guidelines for emergency response immediately following large structural collapse events. It characterizes response activities and expected hazards, and develops guidelines for selecting appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The partial or complete collapse of a multistory building creates an array of physical, chemical, and biological hazards. The most significant uncertainties are the composition and magnitude of the hazards present in the postcollapse e
The Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force's infrastructure resilience guidelines : an initial assessment of implementation by federal agencies by Melissa L Finucane( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 630 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In October 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast of the United States, devastating communities across the region. This disaster motivated the federal government to examine how it might improve community and infrastructure resilience so that communities are better prepared for existing and future threats, including those exacerbated by climate change. To ensure that federal agencies incorporate key principles of resilience into their formulation, evaluation, and prioritization of infrastructure investments related to Sandy rebuilding, the Presidential Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force developed its Infrastructure Resilience Guidelines in the spring and summer of 2013. On behalf of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Interagency Policy Committee{u2019}s Subcommittee on Recovery and Mitigation, the RAND Corporation conducted an initial assessment of federal agencies{u2019} implementation of the guidelines. The main goal of this study was to identify the lessons learned from the opportunities and challenges encountered when implementing the guidelines. Researchers conducted semistructured interviews of 67 individuals employed by federal, state, and local government agencies and departments and nongovernmental organizations. An analysis of the interview notes and other documents provided information on different approaches to implementing the guidelines, the opportunities or challenges encountered during implementation, and whether the guidelines would be feasible to implement in nonrecovery environments. Overall, the guidelines were viewed as reflecting worthy resiliency principles that merit broader pursuit{u2014}and not just in a disaster recovery context
National security perspectives on terrorism risk insurance in the United States by Henry H Willis( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 608 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Congress enacted the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA) in 2002, in response to terrorism insurance becoming unavailable or, when offered, extremely costly in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. The law provides a government reinsurance backstop in the case of a terrorist attack by providing mechanisms for avoiding an immediate drawdown of capital for insured losses or possibly covering the most extreme losses. Extended first in 2005 and again in 2007, TRIA is set to expire at the end of 2014, and Congress is again reconsidering the appropriate government role in terrorism insurance markets. This policy brief examines the potential national security implications of allowing TRIA to expire. Examining the history of terrorism in the United States since the passage of TRIA and reviewing counterterrorism studies, the authors find that terrorism remains a real national security threat, but one that is very difficult for insurers to model the risk of. They also find that terrorism risk insurance can contribute to making communities more resilient to terrorism events, so, to the extent that terrorism insurance is more available with TRIA than without it, renewing the legislation would contribute to improved national security
Measuring Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP) performance : capacities, capabilities, and sustainability enablers for biorisk management and biosurveillance by Stephanie Young( )

4 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 604 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP) is the biological threat component of the Cooperative Threat Reduction program. It grew out of efforts to address risks associated with legacy biological agents, related materials, and technical expertise developed as part of the biological weapon program in the former Soviet Union. CBEP now partners with about 20 countries in different regions around the world and works with them to address diverse threats to international security, including terrorist organizations seeking to acquire pathogens of security concern; human, animal, and agricultural facilities operating with inadequate safety and security safeguards; and the spread of diseases with potential security or economic consequences. As the program has evolved since its inception two decades ago, so too have its content and approaches to performance measurement. The objective of the research reported here was to build on existing work to develop a comprehensive evaluation framework and recommend metrics for assessing and communicating progress toward CBEP's goals. The report ultimately recommends a number of qualitative and quantitative indicators of CBEP performance, some that can be implemented immediately, some to be implemented later"--"Abstract" on Web page
Current and Future Exposure of Infrastructure in the United States to Natural Hazards by Henry H Willis( )

6 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 582 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Communities, companies, and governments at all levels in the United States are making decisions that will influence where, what and how infrastructure will be built. These design and policy decisions shape infrastructure, influence economic development, and influence future exposures to natural hazards for decades. Population growth and shifts, particularly those on the coasts, drive demand for new infrastructure, and, as a result, increase the exposure of infrastructure to natural hazards. These natural hazard exposures are projected to be larger and more uncertain in the future because of the effects of sea level rise and projected changes in temperature and precipitation patterns. Thus, incorporating natural hazard risk assessment into infrastructure planning is becoming both increasingly important and challenging. This report summarizes insights we have gained about the exposures to U.S. infrastructure from natural hazards now and in the future. Our analysis identifies regions in the country where infrastructure may be uniquely exposed to a complex set of natural hazards. In those regions, our analysis highlights the types of infrastructure that are exposed and the hazards that put them at risk. Our analysis also reveals where infrastructure exposures may be expected to change most dramatically. Finally, our analysis reveals where infrastructure exposures remain most uncertain and where new data and analysis would be most valuable. Each of these findings can inform federal efforts to improve infrastructure and resilience planning"--Back cover
Terrorism risk modeling for intelligence analysis and infrastructure protection( Book )

6 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Department of Homeland Security is moving increasingly to risk analysis and risk-based resource allocation, a process that is designed to manage the greatest risks instead of attempting to protect everything. The authors show how a probabilistic terrorism model can be used to assess terrorist risk across cities and within specific cities, and to assist intelligence analysis
Evaluating the security of the global containerized supply chain by Henry H Willis( Book )

6 editions published between 2004 and 2005 in English and held by 177 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Much worldwide cargo, from raw materials to finished products, travels via containerized shipping. For the shippers, the main concern has always been losses from theft or accident. But shipping containers are as attractive to terrorists as they are to thieves and smugglers. New security measures have therefore proliferated. This report defines a framework for assessing the effects of these measures, reviews the balance of current container security risk-reduction efforts, and lays out directions for further research
Increasing the capacity of freight transportation : U.S. and Canadian perspectives( Book )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 131 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disruptions are increasing in North American supply chains. North American freight transport capacity is threatening economic competitiveness. Rising shipping costs, increasingly lengthy shipping times, increasingly variable transit times, and increasingly large inventories are all evidence of constraints in the freight transport system. As North American manufacturing and retail's reliance on imports has increased, highway and rail infrastructure has been neither maintained nor expanded in critical places. Other factors, such as increased fuel prices, security requirements, border delays, and a shortage of truck drivers are eroding the freight transport system's performance. Consequently, shippers are stocking more parts and supplies, resorting to expensive backup transportation, and revisiting facility location decisions to cope with disruptions. In February 2006, more than 30 U.S. and Canadian private- and public-sector stakeholders met to discuss the declining performance of the North American freight transport system and to determine strategies for increasing freight transportation capacity. Participants identified examples of current and expected economic effects of capacity constraints on the freight transport system. They also highlighted specific physical, contractual, and regulatory constraints to the free movement of freight and charted a path toward addressing the most pressing issues through public-sector, private-sector, and joint action. This document summarizes the workshop discussions and the participants' consensus
Measuring illegal border crossing between ports of entry : an assessment of four promising methods by Andrew R Morral( Book )

6 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is responsible for controlling the flow of goods and people across the U.S. border, a difficult task that raises challenging resource management questions about how best to minimize illicit flows across the border while facilitating legitimate ones. Commonly reported border control measures, such as numbers of illegal migrants apprehended or miles of border under effective control, bear only an indirect and uncertain relationship to the border control mission, making them unreliable management tools. Fundamental to the question of border control effectiveness is the proportion of illicit border crossings that are prevented through either deterrence or apprehension. Estimating these proportions requires knowing the total flow of illicit goods or border crossings, but compelling methods for producing such estimates do not yet exist. This short paper describes four innovative approaches to estimating the total flow of illicit border crossings between ports of entry. Each is sufficiently promising to warrant further attention for purposes of supporting reliable, valid, and timely measures of illicit cross-border flow. Successfully implementing each of these approaches will require methodological development and analysis to identify barriers or constraints to using the approach, the cost of data collection, and the amount of error that can be expected in the resulting estimates
Identifying enemies among us : evolving terrorist threats and the continuing challenges of domestic intelligence collection and information sharing by Brian Michael Jenkins( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes the discussions at a seminar organized and hosted by the RAND Corporation at which a group of acting and former senior government and law enforcement officials, practitioners, and experts examined domestic intelligence operations and information sharing as these relate to terrorist threats. Topics discussed include changes in the direction and scope of the threat; the differences in the focus of local, state, and federal agencies; the need for better communication among law enforcement and intelligence agencies; the role of Joint Terrorism Task Forces; the shortcomings of fusion centers; the political sensitivity of collecting domestic intelligence; and the consequences of reductions in counterterrorism funding on the level of risk the American people will accept
Assessing the benefits of U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulatory actions to reduce terrorism risks( Book )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Personal protective equipment guidelines for structural collapse events by Henry H Willis( )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This monograph serves as a technical source for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) incident commander guidelines for emergency response immediately following large structural collapse events. It characterizes response activities and expected hazards, and develops guidelines for selecting appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The partial or complete collapse of a multistory building creates an array of physical, chemical, and biological hazards. The most significant uncertainties are the composition and magnitude of the hazards present in the postcollapse e
Enhancing U.S. Coast Guard metrics by Scott Savitz( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The U.S. Coast Guard needs to measure its operational-level performance effectively to make informed decisions about resource allocation. To assist the Coast Guard in this effort, the authors worked with official documentation and subject-matter experts to develop logic models describing each of the 11 statutory missions of the Coast Guard and using the descriptions to ascertain what aspects of these missions should be measured. The authors examined existing metrics in the light of these logic models, evaluating the metrics in terms of their validity (how well they measured elements of the logic models), reliability (how consistently measurements can be made), and feasibility (how readily measurements can be made). They also analyzed the extent to which existing metrics measure elements of the logic models. They then developed and evaluated sets of potential metrics that could improve on or complement the existing metrics, together with a framework for applying metrics in decisionmaking. This report describes the logic models, existing metrics, and potential metrics, including their relationships with one another and their derivation from Coast Guard sources. Note that, as of this writing, the Coast Guard is considering these findings and has not adopted them as doctrine."--Back cover
Scenario development for the 2015 Quadrennial Energy Review : assessing stresses, opportunities, and resilience in the transmission, storage, and distribution systems for oil and refined-oil products, electricity, and natural gas by Keith Crane( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 57 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The purpose of this analysis was to help the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis assess how energy transmission, storage, and distribution (TS & D) systems might perform under high-stress scenarios in which major shifts in energy demand, supply, or other uncertain factors have the potential to dramatically change the U.S. energy system by 2030. RAND researchers developed an analytical framework and associated metrics for examining vulnerabilities, opportunities, and risks to U.S. TS & D systems through 2030 under a range of uncertainties. They assessed major stresses on and opportunities in three major TS & D systems: oil and refined-oil products, electric power, and natural gas. Separately, they also considered the resilience that these systems have to short-term shocks and disruptions. This analysis was requested to support the 2015 Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). The QER, which, in its first volume, focuses on energy TS & D systems, is a federal government initiative to systematically examine energy system performance and explore options to improve that performance to address 21st-century objectives"--Publisher's description
 
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Estimating terrorism risk
Covers
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operationsMeasuring the effectiveness of border security between ports-of-entryThe state of U.S. railroads : a review of capacity and performance dataProtecting emergency respondersProtecting Emergency Responders, Volume 4 : Personal Protective Equipment Guidelines for Structural Collapse EventsTerrorism risk modeling for intelligence analysis and infrastructure protectionEvaluating the security of the global containerized supply chainIncreasing the capacity of freight transportation : U.S. and Canadian perspectivesPersonal protective equipment guidelines for structural collapse events
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English (110)