WorldCat Identities

Gottschall, Jonathan

Overview
Works: 14 works in 67 publications in 4 languages and 3,188 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: GR72.3, 808.543
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Jonathan Gottschall
 
Most widely held works by Jonathan Gottschall
The storytelling animal : how stories make us human by Jonathan Gottschall( Book )

10 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and Chinese and held by 1,298 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Undiscovered and unmapped country. It's easy to say that humans are "wired" for story, but why? In this book, the author offers a unified theory of storytelling. He argues that stories help us navigate life's complex social problems, just as flight simulators prepare pilots for difficult situations. Storytelling has evolved, like other behaviors, to ensure our survival. Drawing on the latest research in neuroscience, psychology, and evolutionary biology, he tells us what it means to be a storytelling animal. Did you know that the more absorbed you are in a story, the more it changes your behavior? That all children act out the same kinds of stories, whether they grow up in a slum or a suburb? That people who read more fiction are more empathetic? Of course, our story instinct has a darker side. It makes us vulnerable to conspiracy theories, advertisements, and narratives about ourselves that are more "truthy" than true. National myths can also be terribly dangerous: Hitler's ambitions were partly fueled by a story. But as is shown in this book, stories can also change the world for the better. Most successful stories are moral; they teach us how to live, whether explicitly or implicitly, and bind us together around common values. We know we are master shapers of story. This book finally reveals how stories shape us."--Book Jacket
The literary animal : evolution and the nature of narrative( Book )

8 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 451 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The goal of this book is to overcome some of the widespread misunderstandings about the meaning of a Darwinian approach to the human mind generally, and literature specifically
The rape of Troy : evolution, violence, and the world of Homer by Jonathan Gottschall( Book )

12 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 262 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A highly innovative study analysing Homeric conflict from the perspective of modern evolutionary biology
Literature, science, and a new humanities by Jonathan Gottschall( Book )

10 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 255 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Literary studies are at a tipping point. There is broad agreement that the discipline is in "crisis"--That it is aimless, that its intellectual energy is spent, that all of the trends are bad, and that fundamental change will be required to set things right. But there is little agreement on what those changes should be, and no one can predict which way things will ultimately tip. Literature, Science, and a New Humanities represents a bold new response to the crisis in academic literary studies. This book presents a total challenge to dominant paradigms of literary analysis and offers a sweeping critique of those paradigms, and sketches outlines of a new paradigm inspired by scientific theories, methods, and attitudes
Evolution, literature, and film : a reader( Book )

6 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Featuring thirty-nine essential essays by pioneering scholars, scientists, and critics, Evolution, Literature, and Film opens with an introduction to the principles of evolution, with essays from Charles Darwin on the logic of natural selection, Richard Dawkins on the genetic revolution of modern evolutionary theory, Edward O. Wilson on the unity of knowledge, Steven Pinker on the transformation of psychology into an explanatory science, and David Sloan Wilson on the integration of evolutionary theory into cultural critique. Later sections include essays on the adaptive function of the arts, discussions of evolutionary literary theory and film theory, interpretive commentaries on specific works of literature and film, and analyses using empirical methods to explore literary problems. Texts under the microscope include folk- and fairy tales; Homer's Iliad; Shakespeare's plays; works by William Wordsworth, Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, and Zora Neale Hurston; narratives in sci-fi, comics, and slash fiction; and films from Europe, America, Asia, and Africa. Each essay explains the contribution of evolution to a study of the human mind, human behavior, culture, and art
The storytelling animal how stories make us human by Jonathan Gottschall( Recording )

5 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Humans live in landscapes of make-believe. We spin fantasies. We devour novels, films, and plays. Even sporting events and criminal trials unfold as narratives. Yet the world of story has long remained an undiscovered and unmapped country. It's easy to say that humans are "wired" for story, but why? In this delightful and original book, Jonathan Gottschall offers the first unified theory of storytelling. He argues that stories help us navigate life's complex social problems--just as flight simulators prepare pilots for difficult situations. Storytelling has evolved, like other behaviors, to ensure our survival
L'istinto di narrare : come le storie ci hanno reso umani by Jonathan Gottschall( Book )

3 editions published in 2014 in Italian and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Passiamo più tempo immersi in un universo di finzione che nel mondo reale. <<L'isola che non c'è>> è la nostra vera nicchia ecologica, il nostro habitat. Nessun altro animale dipende dalla narrazione quanto l'essere umano, lo <<storytelling animal>>. Questo strano comportamento, che ci porta a mettere al centro della nostra esistenza cose che non esistono, è innato e antichissimo; ci sono segni di finzione fin dai primordi dell'umanità e basta osservare un bambino nel suo quotidiano gioco del <<facciamo finta che>> per capire che si tratta di un istinto primordiale, che ha già dentro di sé quando viene al mondo. Ma a che scopo? Jonathan Gottschall studia la narrazione da molti punti di vista e ha un'idea originale e affascinante per spiegare come si sia sviluppata questa strana abilità. Appoggiandosi, da letterato, alle ricerche più avanzate della biologia e delle neuroscienze, Gottschall evoca i ben tangibili vantaggi del mondo fantastico, e lo fa con il piglio del grande narratore. Raccontando storie, ad esempio, i bambini imparano a gestire i rapporti sociali; con le fantasie a occhi aperti esploriamo mondi alternativi che sarebbe troppo rischioso vivere in prima persona, ma che risulteranno utilissimi nella vita reale; nei romanzi e nei film cementiamo una morale comune che permette alla società di funzionare col minimo possibile di contrasti; e poi è provato che la letteratura ci cambia, fisicamente e in meglio. Qualsiasi insegnante sa bene che per far comprendere un concetto bisogna vestirlo di una trama. Il potere universale della finzione è probabilmente la nostra caratteristica più distintiva, il segreto del nostro successo, ciò che ha reso l'uomo un animale diverso dagli altri, permettendo a lui solo di vivere contemporaneamente molte vite, accumulare esperienze diverse e costruire il proprio mondo con l'incanto dell'invenzione
Beyond belief Enlightenment 2.0( Visual )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"As you watch the conversation in Beyond Belief: Enlightenment 2.0, it might help to know about one of the sources that was helpful to me in formulating the agenda, assembling the cast of characters, and setting the tone for the meeting. I quoted this passage from Humanity: A Moral History of the Twentieth Century by Jonathan Glover (who directs the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics at King's College, London): "Now we tend to see the Enlightenment view of human psychology as thin and mechanical, and Enlightenment hopes of social progress through the spread of humanitarianism and the scientific outlook as naive ... One of this book's aims is to replace the thin, mechanical psychology of the Enlightenment with something more complex, something closer to reality ... another aim of the book is to defend the Enlightenment hope of a world that is more peaceful and humane, the hope that by understanding more about ourselves we can do something to create a world with less misery. I have qualified optimism that this hope is well founded ..." I say Amen to that. If Enlightenment 1.0 took a thin and mechanical view of human nature and psychology, I think Enlightenment 2.0 can offer a much 'thicker' and cognitively richer account - less naive and also, perhaps, less hubristic. If there's one thing we've learned - particularly from cognitive neuroscience - it is that we need to have some strategic humility about the hobby horses we are inclined to ride".--Website
Echte mannen vechten : hoe mannen de pikorde bepalen by Jonathan Gottschall( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in Dutch and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aan de hand van zijn eigen ervaringen met vechtsport vertelt de auteur over martial arts en de verschillen tussen mannen en vrouwen
The professor in the cage : why men fight and why we like to watch by Jonathan Gottschall( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"When a mixed martial arts (MMA) gym moves in across the street from his office, Jonathan Gottschall sees a challenge, and an opportunity. Pushing forty, out of shape, and disenchanted with his job as an adjunct English professor, part of him yearns to cross the street and join up. The other part is terrified. Gottschall eventually works up his nerve, and starts training for a real cage fight. He's fighting not only as a personal test but also to answer questions that have intrigued him for years: Why do men fight? And why do so many seemingly decent people like to watch?"--Amazon.com
The professor in the cage : why men fight and why we like to watch by Jonathan Gottschall( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When a mixed martial arts (MMA) gym moves in across the street from his office, Jonathan Gottschall sees a challenge, and an opportunity. Pushing forty, out of shape, and disenchanted with his job as an adjunct English professor, part of him yearns to cross the street and join up. The other part is terrified. Gottschall eventually works up his nerve, and starts training for a real cage fight. He's fighting not only as a personal test but also to answer questions that have intrigued him for years: Why do men fight? And why do so many seemingly decent people like to watch?--Container
Graphing Jane Austen : the evolutionary basis of literary meaning by Joseph Carroll( Book )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Building on findings in the evolutionary human sciences, we constructed a model of human nature and used it to illuminate the evolved psychology that shapes the organization of characters in nineteenth-century British novels (Austen to Forster). Hundreds of readers gave numerical ratings to the attributes of hundreds of characters and also rated their own emotional responses to the characters. We draw conclusions about the determinacy of literary meaning, interactions between gender and the ethos of community, and the adaptive function of morally polarized characterization. The broad patterns in the novels provide a framework for two case studies: the novels of Jane Austen and Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge
Graphing Jane Austen( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Building on findings in the evolutionary human sciences, we constructed a model of human nature and used it to illuminate the evolved psychology that shapes the organization of characters in nineteenth-century British novels (Austen to Forster). Hundreds of readers gave numerical ratings to the attributes of hundreds of characters and also rated their own emotional responses to the characters. We draw conclusions about the determinacy of literary meaning, interactions between gender and the ethos of community, and the adaptive function of morally polarized characterization. The broad patterns in the novels provide a framework for two case studies: the novels of Jane Austen and Thomas Hardy's <EM>The Mayor of Casterbridge</EM>
Graphing Jane Austen : palaeolithic politics in British novles of the nineteenth century by Joseph Carroll( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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The literary animal : evolution and the nature of narrative
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The rape of Troy : evolution, violence, and the world of HomerLiterature, science, and a new humanitiesEvolution, literature, and film : a reader