WorldCat Identities

Jefferson, Margo 1947-

Overview
Works: 46 works in 100 publications in 6 languages and 4,119 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Biography  History  Anecdotes  Autobiographies  Documentary television programs  Music  Songs and music  Essays  Exhibition catalogs 
Roles: Author, Other, wst, Interviewee, Performer, Teacher
Classifications: ML3508, 305.8960730773110904
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Margo Jefferson
 
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Most widely held works by Margo Jefferson
On Michael Jackson by Margo Jefferson( Book )

6 editions published between 2006 and 2010 in English and German and held by 943 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the Publisher: Margo Jefferson's On Michael Jackson is a lucid and elegant cultural analysis of the rise and fall of the King of Pop. An award-winning cultural critic, Jefferson brings an unexpected compassion as well as her sharp intellect and incomparable insight to Jackson's 2005 trial for child molestation, startling us with her erudite illumination of a media-drenched circus that we only thought we understood. As only she can, Jefferson reads between the lines of Jackson's 1998 autobiography as well as published accounts of his childhood, his family, and Motown-where Michael and his brothers first made the Jackson 5 a household name-leaving us with provocative and perhaps unanswerable questions about Jackson, child stardom, and fame itself
The best American essays 2015( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 411 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Compiles the best literary essays of the year 2014 which were originally published in American periodicals
Developing writers( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 151 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Looking at the works and words of professional and published writers is an essential activity in the writing classroom. While students read for content and meaning they also learn about the writer's craft. Students discover how they can grow as writers by exploring many voices and styles. In this hour, we'll see how teachers help their students learn from professional writers. We'll also hear from several writers who share insights about their own processes and they'll tell us who they turn to for inspiration
Michael Jackson : on the wall by Nicholas Cullinan( Book )

3 editions published in 2018 in English and French and held by 139 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Michael Jackson is one of the most influential cultural figures to come out of the 20th century and his legacy continues into the 21st century. His significance is widely acknowledged when it comes to music, music videos, dance, choreography and fashion, but his considerable influence on contemporary art is an untold story. Since Andy Warhol first used his image in 1982, Jackson has become the most depicted cultural figure in visual art by an extraordinary array of leading contemporary artists. For the first time, Michael Jackson: On the Wall will bring together the works of over forty of these artists, drawn from public and private collections around the world, including new works made especially for the exhibition
Negroland : a memoir by Margo Jefferson( Book )

16 editions published between 2015 and 2017 in 4 languages and held by 133 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Autobiografie van de Amerikaanse recensent en professor (1947), die opgroeide in de zwarte, bevoorrechte middenklasse
On Michael Jackson by Margo Jefferson( Recording )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A culture critic reflects on the cultural and social significance of Michael Jackson, exploring the ways in which the spectacle of Jackson's life and musical talents have shaped American social and popular culture
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Margo Jefferson( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Professor and art critic Margo Jefferson was born on October 17, 1947 in Chicago, Illinois. She received her B.A. degree in English and American literature from Brandeis University in 1968, and her M.S. degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1971. In 1973, Jefferson was hired as an associate editor for Newsweek magazine. She became an assistant professor at New York University in 1979, and, from 1984 to 1989, worked as an arts criticism contributing editor for Vogue magazine. In 1991, Jefferson was hired as a lecturer and later a professor of writing at Columbia University. In 1993, she accepted a position at the New York Times as a culture critic. While at the Times, she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1995, and was promoted to critic-at-large in 1996. Jefferson’s autobiography, Negroland, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography in 2016
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

2 editions published between 2010 and 2017 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jazz video series by Ken Burns traces the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence. Despite the escalation of the Cold War and the growing threat of nuclear annihilation, America achieves a level of growth and prosperity unimaginable just a few years earlier. The nation's musical tastes are changing too, as young people turn to sentimental singers and rhythm and blues. One by one, the big bands leave the road, but Duke Ellington stubbornly keeps his band together, while Louis Armstrong puts together a small group, the "All-Stars", and spreads his fame around the globe. Impresario Norman Granz makes a success of his Jazz at the Philharmonic Tours, insisting on equal treatment for every member of his integrated troupes. Meanwhile, bebop, the music pioneered by Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thelonious Monk, becomes the dominant language of jazz, though the music is not popular outside of the ranks of jazz fans, having been replaced by rhythm and blues in the hearts of young listeners. A devastating narcotics plague sweeps through the jazz community, ruining lives and changing the dynamics of performance. Charlie Parker is idolized throughout the music community, which leads to other musicians copying his drug addiction as well as his music. Charlie Parker never overcomes his own addiction, destroying himself at the age of 34. A group of California-based musicians create a sound, Cool Jazz, that is the opposite of bebop. These musicians include baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan and pianist Dave Brubeck. Miles Davis records charts by composer Gil Evans and begins his ascendancy as the most important jazz artist of his generation
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

2 editions published between 2010 and 2017 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jazz video series by Ken Burns traces the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence. Post-war prosperity continues but beneath its placid surface there is a growing demand for civil rights. Louis Armstrong decides to risk his career by speaking out against southern defiance of the Constitution when he condemns the government for its failure to act on racism in Little Rock, Arkansas. R & B and rock n' roll further erodes the popularity of jazz, but jazz still enjoys tremendous creativity. Miles Davis, having overcome the narcotics addiction that has destroyed so many other musicians' careers, signs with Columbia Records, makes a series of legendary albums and becomes an icon for an entire generation of Americans. The gifted clean-living trumpeter Clifford Brown, a role mode for younger musicians, is killed in a car accident, while Duke Ellington, struggling now to stay on the road, experiences a rebirth of his career after a triumphant appearance at the 1956 Newport Jazz Festival. Drummer Art Blakey forms his Jazz Messengers, which for more than 40 years will provide a proving ground for young musicians. Two legendary figures from the thirties -- Billie Holiday and Lester Young -- pass on not long after making an extraordinary appearance together on television. Meanwhile, three adventurous saxophone masters also make their debuts -- Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman, whose bold "Free" playing helps to launch a new jazz movement -- the avant-garde
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

2 editions published between 2010 and 2017 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jazz video series by Ken Burns traces the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence. As this episode begins, America finds itself mired in the Great Depression, the worst crisis since the Civil War. With the economy in tatters, jazz is called upon to lift the spirits of a frightened country. In Harlem, as dancers Frankie Manning and Norma Miller recall, people are finding solace in a new dance, the Lindy Hop, and in the big band music played by Chick Webb and Fletcher Henderson. At the same time the pianists Fats Waller and Art Tatum spread their own very different brands of musical joy. Both Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington are prospering in spite of the Depression: Armstrong defies one of America's most-feared gangsters and revolutionizes American singing, just as he has already transformed instrumental playing, while Ellington's sophisticated music and elegant personal style help change the perceptions -- and expectations -- of an entire race. Meanwhile, Benny Goodman forms a big band of his own, broadcasting hot swinging music every Saturday night on the "Let's Dance" radio show. When the show is canceled, Goodman, struggling to hold his band together, embarks on a disastrous cross-country tour in the summer of 1935. But at the Palomar Ballroom in Los Angeles young people go wild when Goodman's men begin to play the jazz they love -- and the Swing Era is born
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jazz video series by Ken Burns traces the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence. From 1917 through 1924, the uproarious "Jazz Age", with its flappers, Prohibition, speakeasies, and the booming stock market, sets the tone for this episode, and the story of jazz becomes the story of two great cities, Chicago and New York, and of two extraordinary artists whose lives and music span almost three-quarters of a century -- Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington. Armstrong, a father-less waif brought up on the mean streets of New Orleans, develops what he calls his "gift" -- his unparalleled genius as a trumpet player -- and in 1922 makes his way to Chicago, where he gathers around him a whole generation of worshipful musicians, white as well as black. Ellington, brought up in middle-class comfort and refinement in Washington, D.C., by parents who believe him "blessed", moves to Harlem, forms his own band, and begins to play a new kind of an enthralling blues-drenched music for dancing. Meanwhile, the bandleader Paul Whiteman tries to make jazz more like symphonic music -- "to make a lady out of jazz" -- and Fletcher Henderson plays soft, sweet music for white dancers only at Roseland Ballroom. Then, in 1924, Louis Armstrong comes to New York to join the Henderson band and shows the whole world how to swing. This episode also follows the careers of jazz greats James Reese Europe, King Oliver, Willie Smith, and James P. Johnson
On critical analysis( Visual )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Margo Jefferson, New York Times columnist and writing teacher, and Ann Douglas, American Studies and English teacher, discuss critical analysis in the arts
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jazz video series by Ken Burns traces the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence. By 1924 to 1928, jazz is everywhere in America and spreading abroad. As the stock market soars to record heights, jazz is played in dance halls and speakeasies everywhere. The music now places more emphasis on the innovations of supremely gifted individuals; for the first time, improvising soloists and singers take center stage. Bessie Smith helps make an industry out of the blues -- and faces down the Ku Klux Klan. Bix Beiderbecke, a brilliant cornetist from the American heartland, demonstrates that white musicians, too, can make important contributions to jazz -- only to destroy himself with alcohol at the age of 28. Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw -- each the gifted son of Jewish immigrants -- find in jazz a way out of the ghetto. Sidney Bechet takes his music and his combative personality to Europe. Duke Ellington gets the break of a lifetime when his band is hired by the most celebrated of all Harlem nightspots, the gangster-owned, whites-only Cotton Club, and begins to broadcast his distinctive music all across the country. Meanwhile, Louis Armstrong returns to Chicago, and in 1928, with the pianist Earl Hines, records his first great masterpiece, "West End Blues", which establishes jazz as an expressive art comparable to any other, and proves that Armstrong is the music's presiding genius
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jazz video series by Ken Burns traces the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence. In the mid 1930s, as the Great Depression stubbornly refuses to lift, jazz comes as close as it has ever come to being America's popular music. It has a new name -- Swing -- and for the first time musicians become matinee idols. Benny Goodman finds himself hailed as the "King of Swing", but he has a host of rivals, among them Tommy Dorsey, Jimmie Lunceford, Glen Miller, and Artie Shaw. Louis Armstrong heads a big band of his own. Duke Ellington continues his own independent course. Billie Holiday emerges from a childhood filled with tragedy to make her first joyous recordings and begin her career as the greatest of all female jazz singers. Benny Goodman demonstrates that in a rigidly segregated country there is still room in jazz for great black and white musicians to play side by side onstage. The episode's finale takes place on May 11, 1937, when 4,000 people gather at the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem to witness what is billed as "The Music Battle of the Century", a showdown between Goodman and the indefatigable Chick Webb, a man who hates to lose
Interview with Margo Jefferson, January 23, 2006( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Black dolls : from the collection of Deborah Neff( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book presents over 100 unique handmade African American dolls made between 1850 and 1930 from the collection of Deborah Neff, a Connecticut-based collector and champion of vernacular art. It is believed that African Americans created these dolls for the children in their lives, including members of their own families and respective communities as well as white children in their charge. Acquired over the last 25 years, this renowned collection is considered to be one of the finest of its kind ever to be assembled. The dolls portray faithful yet stylized representations of young and old African Americans-playful boys and girls, well-dressed gentlemen, elegant young ladies, and distinguished older men and women. Made with scraps of cloth, ribbon and lace, or old socks, and stuffed with wool or cotton, these unusual dolls are charming and full of emotional spirit. Their faces are embroidered, stitched and painted to express a variety of emotions, each representing a fascinating story of culture and identity in American history. The book also features an assortment of rare vintage photographs from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, showing both black and white children holding, posing or playing with their dolls. After five years of combing the archives of museums, historical societies and private collections, the research done for this volume uncovered fascinating vernacular photographs of African American children holding white dolls and Caucasian children holding black dolls-but there was not a single image of an African American person holding a black doll. This complex combination of text and imagery has helped transform this book into a commentary about social mobility and racial identity conveyed through the untold story of these dolls. In an essay, renowned artist Faith Ringgold addresses the inherent prejudices of this work as well as her personal connection with the medium. Also included are essays by Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Margo Jefferson and writer Lyle Rexer"--
Some American feminists( Visual )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Interviews and newsreel footage place the American feminist movement in an historical perspective. Six of the women who gave impetus to the movement discuss those issues that most concern them
Jazz( Visual )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From 1917 through 1924 the "Jazz Age" begins with speakeasies, flappers and easy money for some. The story of jazz becomes a tale of two cities, Chicago and New York and of Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, whose lives and music will span three-quarters of a century. This episode also follows the careers of jazz greats James Reese Europe, King Oliver, Willie Smith, Fletcher Henderson, Paul Whiteman and James P. Johnson
Jazz( Visual )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

By 1924 to 1928 jazz is everywhere in America and spreading abroad. For the first time, soloists and singers take center stage, transforming the music with their distinctive voices. This episode traces the careers of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Artie Shaw, Sidney Bechet, Bessie Smith, Earl Hines, Ethel Waters, Bix Beiderbecke, the first great white jazz artist and Benny Goodman, the son of Jewish immigrants
Negroland : a memoir by Margo Jefferson( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

At once incendiary and icy, mischievous and provocative, celebratory and elegiac-here is a deeply felt meditation on race, sex, and American culture through the prism of Margo Jefferson's rarefied upbringing and education among a black elite concerned with distancing itself from whites and the black generality while tirelessly measuring itself against both. Born in upper-crust black Chicago -- her father was for years head of pediatrics at Provident, at the time the nation's oldest black hospital; her mother was a socialite -- Margo Jefferson has spent most of her life among (call them what you will) the colored aristocracy, the colored elite, the blue-vein society. Since the nineteenth century, they have stood apart, these inhabitants of Negroland, "a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of privilege and plenty."Reckoning with the strictures and demands of Negroland at crucial historical moments-the civil-rights movement, the dawn of feminism, the fallacy of postracial America-Margo Jefferson brilliantly charts the twists and turns of a life informed by psychological and moral contradictions. Aware as it is of heartwrenching despair and depression, this book is a triumphant paean to the grace of perseverance
 
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On Michael Jackson
Covers
On Michael Jackson
Alternative Names
Margo Jefferson American theatre critic

Margo Jefferson Amerikaans journaliste

Languages
English (72)

Italian (2)

Polish (2)

German (1)

French (1)

Dutch (1)