WorldCat Identities

Bentley, James W.

Overview
Works: 81 works in 168 publications in 1 language and 5,135 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about James W Bentley
 
Most widely held works by James W Bentley
Historical trends of timber product output in the South by Tony G Johnson( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 278 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Historical data of periodic canvasses of primary wood-using plants are presented for the 13 Southern States. They are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Cubic-foot and standard volume tables are presented for production only. Production is the sum of timber harvested and used within a State, plus all roundwood exported to other U.S. States
Georgia harvest and utilization study, 2004 by James W Bentley( )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 272 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2004, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 96 operations throughout Georgia. There were 2,368 total trees measured, 1,581 or 67 percent were softwood, while 787 or 33 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while the other 14 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-four percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 26 percent was left as logging residue."
South Carolina harvest and utilization study, 2006 by James W Bentley( )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 268 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2006, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 99 operations throughout South Carolina. There were 2,904 total trees measured; 1,763 or 61 percent were softwood, while 1,141 or 39 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 87 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 13 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-nine percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 21 percent was left as logging residue
Alabama harvest and utilization study, 2008 by James W Bentley( )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 267 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2008, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 80 operations throughout Alabama. There were 2,100 total trees measured; 1,433 or 68 percent were softwood, while 667 or 32 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 88 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 12 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-five percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 25 percent was left as logging residue
Determining sample size for tree utilization surveys by Stanley J Zarnoch( )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 263 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service has conducted many studies to determine what proportion of the timber harvested in the South is actually utilized. This paper describes the statistical methods used to determine required sample sizes for estimating utilization ratios for a required level of precision. The data used are those for 515 hardwood and 1,557 softwood trees harvested in east Texas and classified into 5 product types. Two-stage sampling was used to collect the utilization data. The primary units were the logging operation locations and the secondary units were the trees within locations. The ratio of means estimator was used to calculate each of three utilization ratios. How ever, for simplicity, the mean of ratios approach was used to develop the statistical methodology for estimating sample sizes for a specified level of precision, defined as half the width of the 95-percent confidence interval. The infinite population model was used and variance components for the two-stage nested analysis of variance were obtained using PROC MIXED. The three utilization ratios were computed for all product classes for hardwoods and softwoods, as were the standard errors and 95-percent confidence intervals. The variance components were then obtained and used to develop tables that yield sample size scenarios based on specified levels of precision."
North Carolina harvest and utilization study, 2007 by James W Bentley( )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 263 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2007, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 83 operations throughout North Carolina. There were 2,119 total trees measured: 1,323 or 62 percent were softwood, while 796 or 38 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 85 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 15 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-seven percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 23 percent was left as logging residue
Florida harvest and utilization study, 2008 by James W Bentley( )

4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 260 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2008, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 82 operations throughout Florida. There were 2,114 total trees measured: 1,670 or 79 percent were softwood, while 444 or 21 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 85 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 15 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-four percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 26 percent was left as logging residue
North Carolina harvest and utilization study, 2002 by James W Bentley( )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 256 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2002, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 108 operations throughout North Carolina. There were 2,926 total trees measured; 1,693, or 58 percent, were softwood, while 1,233, or 42 percent, were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 14 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-five percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 25 percent was left as logging residue."
Arkansas' timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 2002 by James W Bentley( )

4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 205 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2002, roundwood output from Arkansas forests totaled 680 million cubic feet. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers were 326 million cubic feet. Almost all plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 342 million cubic feet; pulpwood ranked second at 213 million cubic feet; and veneer logs were third at 94 million cubic feet. The number of primary processing plants was 288 in 2002. Receipts for those mills totaled 721 million cubic feet."
Louisiana's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 2002 by James W Bentley( Book )

5 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 198 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2002, industrial roundwood output from Louisiana's forests totaled 720 million cubic feet, 10 percent less than in 1999. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers decreased 4 percent to 275 million cubic feet. Almost all plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 273 million cubic feet; pulpwood ranked second at 266 million cubic feet; veneer logs were third at 137 million cubic feet. The number of primary processing plants increased from 57 in 1999 to 60 in 2002. Total receipts decreased 11 percent to 793 million cubic feet."
East Texas harvest and utilization study, 2008 by Rhonda M Mathison( )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2008, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 80 operations throughout eastern Texas. There were 2,024 total trees measured: 1,335 or 66 percent were softwood, while 689 or 34 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 14 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-five percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 25 percent was left as logging residue
Eastern Texas harvest and utilization study, 2003 by James W Bentley( )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2003, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 81 operations throughout eastern Texas. There were 2,072 total trees measured, 1,557 or 75 percent were softwood, while 515 or 25 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 87 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while the other 13 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-six percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 24 percent was left as logging residue."
The South's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 2003 by Tony G Johnson( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2003, industrial roundwood output from the Souths forests totaled 8.2 billion cubic feet, 6 percent less than in 1999. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers increased 1 percent to 3.2 billion cubic feet. Almost all plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 3.7 billion cubic feet; pulpwood ranked second at 3.3 billion cubic feet; veneer logs were third at 830 million cubic feet. The number of primary processing plants declined from 2,551 in 1999 to 2,281 in 2003. Total receipts declined 5 percent to 8.3 billion cubic feet."
Oklahoma's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 2002 by Tony G Johnson( Book )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2002, roundwood output from Oklahomas forests totaled 126 million cubicfeet. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers totaled 50 millioncubic feet. Almost all plant residue was used primarily for fuel and fiberproducts. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 64 million cubicfeet; pulpwood ranked second at 49 million cubic feet. There were 109 primary processing plants operating in Oklahoma in 2002. Receipts totaled 123 million cubic feet."
Mississippi's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 2002 by Michael Howell( Book )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 190 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2002, industrial roundwood output from Mississippi's forests totaled 927 million cubic feet, 7 percent less than in 1999. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers increased 9 percent to 391 million cubic feet. Almost all plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 526 million cubic feet; pulpwood ranked second at 287 million cubic feet; and veneer logs were third at 78 million cubic feet. The number of primary processing plants increased to 116 in 2002. Total receipts increased 4 percent to 888 million cubic feet."
Mississippi's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 1999 by James W Bentley( )

5 editions published between 2002 and 2012 in English and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 1999, industrial roundwood output from MIssissippi's forests totaled 991 million cubic feet, 4 percent less than in 1995. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers remained the same at 357 million cubic feet. Almost all plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber prodcuts. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 491 million cubic feet; pulpwood ranked second at 404 million cubic feet; veneer logs were third at 71 million cubic feet. The number of primary processing plants remained at 105 in 1999. Total receipts declined 3 perecnt to 855 million cubic feet."
Virginia harvest and utilization study, 2007 by James W Bentley( )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2007, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 81 operations throughout Virginia. There were 2,016 total trees measured: 1,086 or 54 percent were softwood, while 930 or 46 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 14 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-nine percent of the total hardwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while 21 percent was left as logging residue
Tennessee's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 2001 by James W Bentley( Book )

4 editions published between 2004 and 2007 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2001, roundwood output from Tennessee's forests was 325 million cubic feet. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers totaled 125 million cubic feet. Seventy-one percent of the plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 182 million cubic feet; pulpwood ranked second at 127 million cubic feet; other industrial products were third at 14 million cubic feet. There were 450 primary processing plants operating in Tennessee in 2001. Total receipts amounted to 311 million cubic feet."
The south's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 1999 by James W Bentley( Book )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kentucky's timber industry : an assessment of timber product output and use, 2001 by James W Bentley( Book )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2001, roundwood output from Kentucky's forests totaled 196 million cubic feet, 11 percent less than in 1999. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers decreased 18 percent to 89 million cubic feet. Ninety-four percent of plant residues were used, primarily for miscellaneous and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 156 million cubic feet; pulpwood ranked a distant second at 17 million cubic feet; other industrial products were third at 14 million cubic feet. The number of primary processing plants declined from 348 in 1999 to 337 in 2001. Total receipts decreased 7 percent to 220 million cubic feet."
 
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