WorldCat Identities

Berrick, Cathleen A.

Overview
Works: 57 works in 120 publications in 1 language and 9,790 library holdings
Genres: Reports  Rules 
Roles: Author
Classifications: TL725.3.S44, 363.28760681
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Cathleen A Berrick
Aviation security : factors could limit the effectiveness of the Transportation Security Administration's efforts to secure aerial advertising operations by Cathleen A Berrick( )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 314 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aviation security : status of transportation security inspector workforce by Cathleen A Berrick( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 307 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report was written in response to House Report 110-181, accompanying H.R. 2638, the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Bill, 2008. In accordance with direction in that report, we are reporting on the operation of the transportation security inspector (TSI) program since it has been located at the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) within the Department of Homeland Security, including the size of the TSI workforce, the roles and responsibilities of TSIs, and the extent to which TSA has a reasonable basis for determining the size of the workforce needed to achieve inspection goals.--P. 1
Aviation security : federal coordination for responding to in-flight security threats has matured, but procedures can be strengthened by Cathleen A Berrick( )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 307 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Review of the Transportation Security Administration's air cargo screening exemptions report by Cathleen A Berrick( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 306 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Transportation Security Administration's Office of Intelligence : responses to posthearing questions regarding Secure Flight by Cathleen A Berrick( )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 304 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aviation security : TSA's cost and performance study of private-sector airport screening by Cathleen A Berrick( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 303 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report formally responds to Congress' request that GAO review the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) Screening Partnership Program (SPP). In accordance with the Aviation and Transportation Security Act, TSA created the SPP to allow commercial airports an opportunity to apply to TSA to use private sector screeners through qualified private-screening contractors approved by TSA. In February 2008, TSA issued a report on its study comparing the cost and performance of screening services at SPP and non-SPP airports. Our briefing addresses the following questions: (1) To what extent did the design of TSA's study of the cost and performance of passenger and checked baggage screening services at selected SPP and non-SPP airports affect the usefulness of the study? (2) To what extent has TSA taken actions to identify and eliminate any unnecessary overhead/supervisory redundancies at SPP airports between TSA and contractor personnel? (3) What factors do airport operators cite as having contributed to airports' decisions about whether to participate in the SPP? We are recommending that if TSA plans to rely on its comparison of costs and performance of SPP and non-SPP airports for future decision making, the agency update its study to address the limitations we identified, for example, by including various cost elements that were excluded and conducting statistical tests to determine the level of confidence in any observed differences in screening performance. TSA generally agreed with our findings and recommendation. --P. 1
Transportation Security Administration's suspension of the butane lighter ban onboard commercial aircraft by Cathleen A Berrick( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 303 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1) The August 2006 attempt by individuals to carry liquid explosives onboard multiple commercial aircraft bound for the United States from the United Kingdom has highlighted both the continued importance of securing the civil aviation system and the potential that improvised explosive devices (IEDs) may be smuggled onboard passenger aircraft. 2) The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), which has primary responsibility for ensuring the security of civil aviation, maintains a prohibited items list that informs both the Transportation Security Officers (TSO)1 who conduct passenger screening and the traveling public of items that will not be allowed into an airport sterile area or onboard an aircraft. 3) Passenger screening is a process by which TSOs inspect individuals and property at designated screening locations to deter and prevent the carriage of any items included on
Appointment and qualifications of U.S. Marshals by Cathleen A Berrick( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 301 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Marshal Service was created by the first Congress in the Judiciary Act of 1789. U.S. Marshals were placed in each federal judicial district and were given broad authority to support the federal courts and to carry out all lawful orders issued by judges, Congress, and the President. Early duties of U.S. Marshals included taking the census, distributing presidential proclamations, protecting the borders, and making arrests. Beginning in the late nineteenth century, some responsibilities of U.S. Marshals were transferred to newly created federal agencies, including the U.S. Census Bureau, Immigration and Naturalization Service, and Federal Bureau of Investigation. Today, the primary responsibilities of U.S. Marshals include protecting federal judges and witnesses, transporting federal prisoners, apprehending federal fugitives, and managing assets seized from criminal enterprises. We obtained information on the (1) U.S. Marshals' appointment process and, for comparison, the processes used by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF); Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA); and Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) to select senior field supervisors; (2) experience, education and diversity of U.S. Marshals and senior field supervisors at the ATF, DEA, and IRS-CI; (3) authority of the Director of the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) to guide and control activities of U.S. Marshals; and (4) past legislative and other proposals for reforming the U.S. Marshals' appointment process. The process used to appoint U.S. Marshals to the federal judicial districts has not changed since the founding of the USMS. The President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, appoints U.S. Marshals for a 4-year term. According to the Congressional Research Service, custom dictates that the President generally nominates an individual recommended by the Senator(s) from the state in which the vacancy is being filled if they are from the same party as the President. If neither Senator is from the same party, the President normally defers to the recommendations of party leaders from the state. While the average length of overall law enforcement experience of current U.S. Marshals was not significantly different than that of senior field supervisors at the ATF, DEA, and IRS-CI, the level of government from which the experience was obtained differed. Specifically, as of January 2003, current U.S. Marshals averaged 23 years of law enforcement experience, compared with 26 years at the DEA, 22 years at the IRS-CI, and 21 years at the ATF for senior field supervisors. However, the majority of law enforcement experience of U.S. Marshals was at the state, local, or county level, while the majority of law enforcement experience for senior field supervisors at the ATF, DEA, and IRS-CI was within their respective federal agencies. We also noted differences in the amount of supervisory law enforcement experience among current U.S. Marshals and senior field supervisors at the ATF, DEA, and IRS-CI. Regarding education, 54 out of 86 (63 percent) current U.S. Marshals, as of January 2003, had a bachelors or more advanced degree, as compared with 18 out of 20 (90 percent) senior field supervisors at the ATF, 19 out of 21 (90 percent) senior field supervisors at the DEA, and all 35 (100 percent) senior field supervisors at the IRS-CI. We also noted some differences between the gender and race/ethnicity profiles among U.S. Marshals and senior field supervisors at ATF, DEA, and IRS-CI. Prior to 1970s, individual U.S. Marshals operated without any centralized management over their activities. Although they were placed under the general supervision of the Attorney General under the original legislation creating the USMS, U.S. Marshals essentially operated independently within their individual districts. In the early 1970s, Attorney General orders established the USMS as a bureau within the Department of Justice led by a Director. In addition, the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 statutorily established the USMS as a bureau within the DOJ, with a Director appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate. Over the past century, Congress, along with a number of presidential commissions studying government reform, proposed abolishing the presidential appointment of U.S. Marshals and establishing a competitive selection process in its place. However, Congress has not adopted any of these recommendations. The U.S. Marshals Service Reform Act of 2002 (S. 1977) was the latest legislative proposal to reform the appointment of U.S. Marshals. This bill, which was not enacted, would have provided for the appointment of U.S. Marshals by the Attorney General through the competitive civil service promotion process, as used by the ATF, DEA, and IRS-CI
Aviation security : challenges exist in stabilizing and enhancing passenger and baggage acreening operations by Cathleen A Berrick( )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 277 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aviation security : efforts to measure effectiveness and address challenges by Cathleen A Berrick( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 269 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aviation security : efforts to measure effectiveness and strengthen security programs by Cathleen A Berrick( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 267 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

TSA's Explosives Detection Canine Program : status of increasing number of explosives detection canine teams by Cathleen A Berrick( )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 252 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Passenger rail security : enhanced federal leadership needed to prioritize and guide security efforts by Cathleen A Berrick( )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.43 (from 0.41 for Aviation s ... to 0.48 for Passenger ...)

Languages
English (41)