WorldCat Identities

Yacobucci, Brent D.

Overview
Works: 63 works in 216 publications in 1 language and 1,351 library holdings
Classifications: JK1108, 338.476292220973
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Brent D Yacobucci Publications about Brent D Yacobucci
Publications by  Brent D Yacobucci Publications by Brent D Yacobucci
Most widely held works by Brent D Yacobucci
Sport utility vehicles, mini-vans and light trucks an overview of fuel economy and emissions standards by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
18 editions published between 1999 and 2004 in English and held by 244 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Fuel ethanol background and public policy issues by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
29 editions published between 1999 and 2007 in English and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Ethanol plays a key role in policy discussions about energy, agriculture, taxes, and the environment. In the United States it is mostly made from corn; in other countries it is often made from cane sugar. Fuel ethanol is generally blended in gasoline to reduce emissions, increase octane, and extend gasoline stocks. Recent high oil and gasoline prices have led to increased interest in alternatives to petroleum fuels for transportation. Further, concerns over climate change have raised interest in developing fuels with lower fuel-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions. Supporters of ethanol argue that its use can lead to lower emissions of toxic and ozone-forming pollutants, and greenhouse gases, especially if higher-level blends are used. They further argue that ethanol use displaces petroleum imports, thus promoting energy security. Ethanol's detractors argue that various federal and state policies supporting ethanol distort the market and amount to corporate welfare for corn growers and ethanol producers. Further, they argue that the energy and chemical inputs needed to turn corn into ethanol actually increase emissions and energy consumption, although most recent studies have found modest energy and emissions benefits from ethanol use relative to gasoline. The market for fuel ethanol is heavily dependent on federal incentives and regulations. Ethanol production is encouraged by a federal tax credit of 51 cents per gallon. This incentive allows ethanol -- which has historically been more expensive than conventional gasoline -- to compete with gasoline and other blending components. In addition to the above tax credit, small ethanol producers qualify for an additional production credit. It has been argued that the fuel ethanol industry could scarcely survive without these incentives. In addition to the above tax incentives, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109- 58) established a renewable fuels standard (RFS). This standard requires the use of 4.0 billion gallons of renewable fuels in 2006, increasing each year to 7.5 billion gallons in 2012. Most of this requirement will likely be met with ethanol. In the United States, approximately 3.4 billion gallons of ethanol were consumed in 2004. Thus, the RFS will likely lead to a doubling of the U.S. ethanol market by 2012. Some analysts believe that this program could have serious effects on gasoline suppliers, leading to somewhat higher fuel prices. Thus, the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the program will likely be of continuing concern to Congress. Other issues of Congressional interest include support for purer blends of ethanol as an alternative to gasoline (as opposed to a gasoline blending component), promotion of ethanol vehicles and infrastructure, and imports of ethanol from foreign countries. This report supersedes CRS Report RL30369, Fuel Ethanol: Background and Public Policy Issues (available from author). It will be updated as events warrant
U.S. automotive industry : policy overview and recent history by Stephen Cooney ( Book )
7 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 117 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles issues in Congress by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
16 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and held by 91 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles are seen by proponents as integral to improving urban air quality, decreasing dependence on foreign oil, and reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. However, major barriersespecially economicscurrently prevent the widespread use of these fuels and technologies. Because of these barriers, and the potential benefits, there is continued congressional interest in providing incentives and other support for their development and commercialization. Alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles have been addressed early in the 111th Congress, as both the House and Senate versions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (H.R. 1) contained provisions supporting their development and deployment. While some of these provisions were removed in conference, the final version still contains provisions for tax incentives, federal grants and loans, and other federal support for alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. The 111th Congress is likely to further discuss alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles as it addresses other key topics. These include their role in any federal policy to address climate change, and their role in federal energy policy. The 111th Congress may also play an oversight role in the development of major regulations: the Environmental Protection Agencys implementation of the renewable fuel standard enacted in 2005, and expanded in 2007; the Department of Transportations implementation of new fuel economy standards enacted in 2007; and the Department of Agricultures implementation of a new Farm Bill enacted in 2008. In the 110th Congress, alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles received a good deal of attention, especially in discussions over U.S. energy security
Alternative transportation fuels and vehicles energy, environment, and development issues by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
12 editions published between 2000 and 2005 in English and held by 83 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Automobile and light truck fuel economy the CAFE standards by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
16 editions published between 2006 and 2009 in English and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
On April 6, 2006, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a final rulemaking for sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and light duty trucks beginning with model year (MY) 2008). The rule restructures the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) program for light trucks to establish standards based upon vehicle size, as opposed to the current program with one average standard for all light trucks. It marks a significant change to the CAFE program for trucks. The sharp rise in gasoline prices during spring 2006 focused attention on the CAFE standards for passenger cars, and the fact that NHTSA does not have the same latitude to make changes to passenger car CAFE or the passenger car CAFE program. For trucks, the agency established two different tracks that manufacturers can follow for model years 2008-2010 -- meeting an "unreformed" or "reformed" CAFE standard. In MY2011, all manufacturers will have to meet the reformed standard. The unreformed light-duty truck standards are a fleetwide average of 22.5, 23.1, and 23.5 mpg for model years 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively. Manufacturers opting for the reformed standard will be required to meet a range of standards depending on vehicle size. Starting in MY2011, the reformed light truck CAFE standards, with a range of 21.8 to 30.4 mpg, will apply to all manufacturers. NHTSA estimates that under the reformed system, light trucks will average 24.0 mpg in MY2011
Advanced vehicle technologies energy, environment, and development by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
4 editions published between 2000 and 2007 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Research and development of cleaner and more efficient vehicle technologies has been ongoing for the past few decades. Much of this research started in response to the oil shocks of the 1970s, which triggered concerns about rising fuel costs and growing dependence on imported fuel. The urgency of those concerns was lost as fuel prices declined in the 1980s and 1990s. At the same time, however, rising concerns about vehicle contributions to air pollution and global climate change added a new dimension to the issue. Recently, instability in world oil prices and political concerns have reawakened the energy dependence concerns of the 1970s. Meanwhile, research on new technologies continues, with a particular focus on commercialization. Despite widespread agreement in principle on the benefits of decreased dependence on petroleum and the internal combustion engine, the practical challenges posed by a transition to advanced vehicle technologies are formidable. Nonetheless, significant research and development progress has been made since the 1970s. These new technologies have sparked more interest as some major auto manufacturers have introduced high-efficiency production vehicles to the American market, and others have plans to introduce similar vehicles in the future. Furthermore, interest has grown recently as a result of higher petroleum prices, and the announcement of new emission regulations for passenger vehicles. In January 2002, the Bush Administration announced the FreedomCAR initiative, which focuses federal research on fuel cell vehicles. In conjunction with FreedomCAR, in January 2003, President Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which focuses federal research on hydrogen fuel and fuel cells for stationary applications. The goal of these initiatives is to improve the competitiveness of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technologies. However, fuel cell vehicles share many components with hybrid and pure electric vehicles. Thus, this research will likely promote advanced vehicle technologies in general. This report discusses four major vehicle technologies -- electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrids, and fuel cell vehicles -- as well as advanced component technologies. Each technology is discussed in terms of cost, fueling and maintenance infrastructure, and performance
Climate change legislation in the 109th Congress by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
6 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Diesel fuel and engines an analysis of EPA's new regulations ( Book )
4 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Diesel fuel and engines an overview of new emissions regulations by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle R&D FreedomCAR and the President's hydrogen fuel initiative by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
6 editions published between 2005 and 2008 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Greenhouse gases : management, reduction, and impact by Jonathan L Ramseur ( Book )
3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Climate change legislation in the 108th Congress by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Climate change legislation in the 108th Congress by Kyna Powers ( Book )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Climate change summary and analysis of the "Climate Stewardship Act" (S. 139.Amt. 2028, and H.R. 4067) by Larry Parker ( Book )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Ethanol and biofuels agriculture, infrastructure, and market constraints related to expanded production by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
High petroleum and gasoline prices, concerns over global climate change, and the desire to promote domestic rural economies have greatly increased interest in biofuels as an alternative to petroleum in the U.S. transportation sector. Biofuels, most notably corn-based ethanol, have grown significantly in the past few years as a component of U.S. motor fuel supply. Ethanol, the most commonly used biofuel, is blended in nearly half of all U.S. gasoline (t the 10% level or lower in most cases). However, current biofuel supply represents less than 4% of total gasoline demand. While recent proposals have set the goal of significantly expanding biofuel supply in the coming decades, questions remain about the ability of the U.S. biofuel industry to meet rapidly increasing demand. Current U.S. biofuel supply relies almost exclusively on ethanol produced from Midwest corn. In 2006, 17% of the U.S. corn crop was used for ethanol production. To meet some of the higher ethanol production goals would require more corn than the United States currently produces, if all of the envisioned ethanol was made from corn. Due to the concerns with significant expansion in corn-based ethanol supply, interest has grown in expanding the market for biodiesel produced from soybeans and other oil crops. However, a significant increase in U.S. biofuels would likely require a movement away from food and grain crops. Other biofuel feedstock sources, including cellulosic biomass, are promising, but technological barriers make their future uncertain. Issues facing the U.S. biofuels industry include potential agricultural "feedstock" supplies, and the associated market and environmental effects of a major shift in U.S. agricultural production; the energy supply needed to grow feedstocks and process them into fuel; and barriers to expanded infrastructure needed to deliver more and more biofuels to the market. This report outlines some of the current supply issues facing biofuels industries, including the limitations on agricultural feedstocks, infrastructure constraints, energy supply for biofuel production, and fuel price uncertainties
Ethanol and other biofuels potential for U.S.-Brazil energy cooperation by Clare Ribando Seelke ( Book )
4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In the past several years, high oil and gas prices, instability in many oil producing countries, and concerns about global climate change have heightened interest in ethanol and other biofuels as alternatives to petroleum products. Reducing oil dependency is a goal shared by the United States and many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, a region composed primarily of energy-importing countries. In the region, Brazil stands out as an example of a country that has become a net exporter of energy, partially by increasing its production and use of sugar-based ethanol. On March 9, 2007, the United States and Brazil, which together produce almost 70% of the world's ethanol, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to promote greater cooperation on ethanol and other biofuels in the Western Hemisphere. The countries agreed to (1) advance research and development bilaterally, (2) help build domestic biofuels industries in third countries, and (3) work multilaterally to advance the global development of biofuels. This report may be updated
Climate change comparison and analysis of S. 1151 and the draft "Climate and Economy Insurance Act of 2005" by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Climate change summary and analysis of the Climate Stewardship Act (S. 342, S. 1151, and H.R. 759) by Larry Parker ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Tax incentives for alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles by Brent D Yacobucci ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Audience level: 0.91 (from 0.53 for Greenhouse ... to 0.96 for Diesel fue ...)
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English (144)
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