WorldCat Identities

Barr, Juliana

Overview
Works: 14 works in 53 publications in 1 language and 3,280 library holdings
Genres: History  Reference works  Exhibition catalogs  Academic theses 
Roles: Editor, Author, Contributor
Classifications: HQ1410, 305.40973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Juliana Barr
Peace came in the form of a woman : Indians and Spaniards in the Texas borderlands by Juliana Barr( Book )

15 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in English and held by 1,184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Revising the standard narrative of European-Indian relations in America, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, resist, and persevere
Contested spaces of early America by JULIANA BARR( )

12 editions published between 2014 and 2017 in English and held by 970 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contested Spaces of Early America is a wide-ranging, eclectic volume that seeks to reconcile the parallel histories and historiographies of European and Indian spaces created throughout the hemisphere during the colonial era
Why you can't teach United States history without American Indians by Susan Sleeper-Smith( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 730 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches - social, cultural, military, and political - consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American
La Belle : the ship that changed history( )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 281 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After two decades of searching for La Salle's lost ship La Belle, Texas Historical Commission (THC) divers in 1995 located a shipwreck containing historic artifacts of European origin in the silty bottom of Matagorda Bay, off the coast of Texas. The first cannon lifted from the waters bore late seventeenth-century French insignias. The ill-fated La Belle had been found. Under the direction of then-THC Archeology Division Director James Bruseth, the THC conducted a full excavation of the water-logged La Belle. The conservation was subsequently completed at Texas A & M University's Conservation Research Laboratory, resulting in preservation of more than one million artifacts from the wreck. An official naval vessel granted to La Salle by the king of France in 1684, La Belle is still considered a sovereign naval vessel belonging to the French government under international maritime law. A formal agreement negotiated by the French Republic, the Muse national de la Marine, the US Department of State, and the THC allows the ship and artifacts to remain in Texas permanently and to be housed in an exhibit at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, opening October 2014. This richly illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibit
La Belle : the ship that changed history( Book )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After two decades of searching for La Salle's lost ship La Belle, Texas Historical Commission (THC) divers in 1995 located a shipwreck containing historic artifacts of European origin in the silty bottom of Matagorda Bay, off the coast of Texas. The first cannon lifted from the waters bore late seventeenth-century French insignias. The ill-fated La Belle had been found. Under the direction of then-THC Archeology Division Director James E. Bruseth, the THC conducted a full excavation of the water-logged La Belle. The conservation was subsequently completed at Texas A & M University's Conservation Research Laboratory, resulting in preservation of more than one million artifacts from the wreck. An official naval vessel granted to La Salle by the king of France in 1684, La Belle is still considered a sovereign naval vessel belonging to the French government under international maritime law. A formal agreement negotiated by the French Republic, the Musée national de la Marine, the US Department of State, and the THC allows the ship and artifacts to remain in Texas permanently and to be housed in an exhibit at Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin. Containing page after page of visually stunning detail and authoritative historical and archeological background, La Bell, The Ship That Changed History is a rich tribute to the painstaking work that led to the discovery and preservation of this cultural treasure. It is also an intriguing and entertaining window on Texas's pivotal place during the era of European colonization of North America.--Back cover
A companion to American women's history by Karen Anderson( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This collection of twenty-four original essays by leading scholars in American women's history highlights the most recent important scholarship on the key debates and future directions of this popular and contemporary field. <li>Covers the breadth of American Women's history, including the colonial family, marriage, health, sexuality, education, immigration, work, consumer culture, and feminism. <li>Surveys and evaluates the best scholarship on every important era and topic. <li>Includes expanded bibliography of titles to guide further research. </li>
The gender socialization of slave children in the antebellum South by Juliana Barr( )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The "seductions" of Texas : the political language of gender in the conquest of Texas, 1690-1803 by Juliana Barr( )

3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guardian: an experimental system for intelligent ICU monitoring by Stanford University( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

1262( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Forum : colonial historians and American Indians( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Protocols and Hospital Mortality in Critically Ill Patients( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objective: Clinical protocols may decrease unnecessary variation in care and improve compliance with desirable therapies. We evaluated whether highly protocolized ICUs have superior patient outcomes compared with less highly protocolized ICUs. Design: Observational study in which participating ICUs completed a general assessment and enrolled new patients 1 day each week. Patients: A total of 6, 179 critically ill patients. Setting: Fifty-nine ICUs in the United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: The primary exposure was the number of ICU protocols; the primary outcome was hospital mortality. A total of 5, 809 participants were followed prospectively, and 5, 454 patients in 57 ICUs had complete outcome data. The median number of protocols per ICU was 19 (interquartile range, 15-21.5). In single-variable analyses, there were no differences in ICU and hospital mortality, length of stay, use of mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, or continuous sedation among individuals in ICUs with a high versus low number of protocols. The lack of association was confirmed in adjusted multivariable analysis (p = 0.70). Protocol compliance with two ventilator management protocols was moderate and did not differ between ICUs with high versus low numbers of protocols for lung protective ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (47% vs 52%; p = 0.28) and for spontaneous breathing trials (55% vs 51%; p = 0.27). Conclusions: Clinical protocols are highly prevalent in U.S. ICUs. The presence of a greater number of protocols was not associated with protocol compliance or patient mortality
From captives to slaves : commodifying Indian women in the borderlands by Juliana Barr( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A Currency in Women : Two Native American Slave Markets in the Eighteenth Century Borderlands of Early America. by Juliana Barr( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Peace came in the form of a woman : Indians and Spaniards in the Texas borderlands
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Languages
English (52)