WorldCat Identities

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs

Overview
Works: 82 works in 102 publications in 1 language and 1,017 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Case studies 
Classifications: RA410.55.E85, 362.110681
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
 
Most widely held works by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
OECD health technical papers by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development( )

in Undetermined and English and held by 598 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This series is designed to make available to a wider readership methodological studies and statistical analysis presenting and interpreting new data sources, and empirical results and developments in methodology related to measuring and assessing health care and health expenditure. The papers are generally available only in their original language - English or French - with a summary in the other
Increasing adult learning participation : learning from successful reforms by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Countries need to urgently scale-up and upgrade their adult learning systems to help people adapt to the future world of work. Today, only two in five adults across the EU and OECD participate in education and training in any given year, according to the OECD Survey of Adults Skills. Participation is even lower among disadvantaged adults, such as those with low skill levels or in jobs at high risk of automation. For adult learning systems to be future-ready, governments must increase their efforts to engage more adults in continuous learning throughout their lives. While much has been written about the need for progress, it is less clear how adult learning participation can be increased in practice. Many good ideas struggle to translate into real change on the ground, as they get stuck in the reality of policy implementation. This report aims to understand the factors that make adult learning reforms succeed. It identifies lessons from six countries that have significantly increased participation over the past decades: Austria, Estonia, Italy, Hungary, the Netherlands and Singapore. To shed light on how these countries achieved this objective, this study looks at the details of reform design, implementation and evaluation
OECD social, employment, and migration working papers by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development( )

in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This series is designed to make available to a wider readership selected labour market, social policy and migration studies prepared for use within the OECD. Authorship is usually collective, but principal writers are named. The papers are generally available only in their original language - English or French - with a summary in the other
Comparing Price Levels of Hospital Services Across Countries : Results of Pilot Study by Francette Koechlin( )

3 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Health services account for a large and increasing share of production and expenditure in OECD countries but there are also noticeable differences between countries in expenditure per capita. Whether such differences are due to more services consumed in some countries than in others or whether they reflect differences in the price of services is a question of significant policy relevance. Yet, cross-country comparisons of the price of health services are rare and fraught with measurement issues. This paper presents a new set of comparative prices for hospital services in a selection of OECD countries. The data is novel in that it reflects quasi-prices (negotiated or administrative prices or tariffs) of the output of hospital services. Traditionally, prices of outputs have been compared by comparing prices of inputs such as wage rates of medical personnel. The new methodology moves away from the input perspective towards an output perspective. This should allow productivity differences between countries to be captured and paves the way for more meaningful comparisons of the volume of health services provided to consumers in the different countries. One of the key findings of the pilot study is that the price level of hospital services in the United States is more than 60 % above that of the average price level of 12 countries included in the study. Price levels turn out to be significantly below average in Korea, Israel and Slovenia
OECD health working papers by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development( )

in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This series is designed to make available to a wider readership health studies prepared for use within the OECD. Authorship is usually collective, but principal writers are named. The papers are generally available only in their original language - English or French - with a summary in the other
Improved health system performance through better care coordination by Maria M Hofmarcher( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report attempts to assess whether -- and to what degree - better care coordination can improve health system performance in terms of quality and cost-efficiency. Coordination of care refers to policies that help create patient-centred care that is more coherent both within and across care settings and over time. Broadly speaking, it means making health-care systems more attentive to the needs of individual patients and ensuring they get the appropriate care for acute episodes as well as care aimed at stabilising their health over long periods in less costly environments. These issues are of particular interest to patients with chronic conditions and the elderly who may find it difficult to "navigate" fragmented health-care systems that are often found in OECD countries. Interest in coordination of care issues is increasing Growing interest in these issues has reflected a shift in the demands placed on health-care services. Chronic conditions have become progressively more important and are absorbing a growing share of health-care budgets. Since most of the chronically ill are elderly, this share can be expected to rise as populations age over coming decades. At the same time, many reports suggest that the quality of care that the chronically ill receive may need improvement. With these developments occurring in a context of tight public finance, some countries have been attempting to improve both the quality of care provided to the chronically ill and reduce cost pressures via changes to the architecture of health-care systems that encourage greater care coordination
A comparative analysis of health forecasting methods by Roberto Astolfi( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Concerns about health expenditure growth and its long-term sustainability have stimulated the development of health expenditure forecasting models in many OECD countries. This comparative analysis reviewed 25 models that were developed by, or used for, policy analysis by OECD member countries and other international organisations
Impact of Publicly Provided Services on the Distribution of Resources by Gerlinde Verbist( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Description of Alternative Approaches to Measure and Place a Value on Hospital Products in Seven OECD Countries by Luca Lorenzoni( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper provides a description of the classification systems used to measure hospital services in selected OECD countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Norway, United Kingdom (England), and the United States. Three classifications are relevant: those on diagnoses; on procedures; and on products. In addition, methods used to measure the cost of hospital services are reviewed
The prevention of lifestyle-related chronic diseases : an economic framework by F Sassi( Book )

4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper provides an economic perspective on the prevention of chronic diseases, focusing in particular on diseases linked to lifestyle choices. The proposed economic framework is centred on the hypothesis that the prevention of chronic diseases may provide the means for increasing social welfare, enhancing health equity, or both, relative to a situation in which chronic diseases are simply treated once they emerge. Testing this hypothesis requires the completion of several conceptual and methodological steps. The pathways through which chronic diseases are generated must be identified as well as the levers that could modify those pathways. Justification for action must be sought by examining whether the determinants of chronic diseases are simply the outcome of efficient market dynamics, or the effect of market and rationality failures preventing individuals from achieving the best possible outcomes. Where failures exist, possible preventive interventions must be conceived, whose expected impact on individual choices should be commensurate to the extent of those failures and to the severity of the outcomes arising from them. A positive impact of such interventions on social welfare and health equity should be assessed empirically through a comprehensive evaluation before interventions are implemented
The supply of physician services in OECD countries by Steven Simoens( Book )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The delivery of an appropriate quantity and quality of health care in an efficient way requires, among other things, matching the supply with the demand for the services of physicians, over time. Such matching has led to very different levels of physicians per million population across OECD countries - because of variations, among other things, in: morbidity and mortality, health expenditure as a share of GDP and the design of health systems. In addition, there are signs that a higher density of physicians is found in countries which have left the supply of physicians mainly to the market whereas lower density is found in countries which have planned the intake to medical schools centrally over many years
Consumer Direction and Choice in Long-Term Care for Older Persons, Including Payments for Informal Care : How Can it Help Improve Care Outcomes, Employment and Fiscal Sustainability? by Jens Lundsgaard( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As the number of older persons in need of long-term care increases, efforts to support older persons remaining in their home are intensified in most OECD countries. In this context of ageing in place, there is a movement towards allowing more individual choice for older persons receiving publicly funded long-term care at home. Having more flexibility in terms of how to receive care can increase the older person's self-determination and that of his/her informal care givers. Having a choice among alternative care providers can empower older persons as consumers and may help strengthen the role of households in the care-management process. Choice can also help address quality aspects that are difficult to quantify but easy to experience for users, such as the personal interaction between the older person and the care giver
Reforming Retirement-Income Systems : Lessons from the Recent Experiences of OECD Countries by John P Martin( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1. Reforming pensions looms large over the policy agenda of OECD countries. This is hardly surprising since public spending on pensions accounted on average for 7 per cent of OECD GDP in 2005; and this pension spending effort is set to increase significantly over the coming decades in response to population ageing. Pension policy is indeed challenging and controversial because it involves long-term decisions in the face of numerous short-term political pressures. 2. However, the status quo does not always win out so far as pension reform in concerned: public finance crises and the looming threat of ageing populations have proved effective spurs for reform. As a result, much has been done since the early 1990s to make pension systems fit for the future. Nearly all the 30 OECD countries have made at least some changes to their pension systems in that period. In 16 of them, there have been major reforms that will significantly affect future benefits. 3. The purpose of this paper is to summarise these reforms and highlight the main lessons. Section 1 looks at which countries reformed their pensions systems and which did not. It also examines the fiscal challenges posed by public pensions. Section 2 describes the measures in the reforms themselves. These include, among other things, increases in pension age, changes in the way benefits are calculated and smaller pension increases in retirement than in the past. Section 3 explores the impact of these reforms on future pension entitlements of today's retirees, showing a clear trend to a lower pension promise for today's workers than for past generations. This means that people will need to save more for their own retirement via private pension schemes, an issue examined in Section 4. This is followed in Section 5 by a review of the main outstanding challenges facing pension systems in OECD countries. The final section presents some concluding remarks
Education and Obesity in Four OECD Countries( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An epidemic of obesity has been developing in virtually all OECD countries over the last 30 years. Existing evidence provides strong suggestions that such epidemic has affected certain social groups more than others. In particular, education appears to be associated with a lower likelihood of obesity, especially among women. A range of analyses of health survey data from Australia, Canada, England and Korea were undertaken with the aim of exploring the relationship between education and obesity. The findings of these analyses show a broadly linear relationship between the number of years spent in full-time education and the probability of obesity, with most educated individuals displaying lower rates of the condition (the only exception being men in Korea). This suggests that marginal returns to education, in terms of reduction in obesity rates, are approximately constant throughout the education spectrum. The findings obtained confirm that the education gradient in obesity is stronger in women than in men. Differences between genders are minor in Australia and Canada, more pronounced in England and major in Korea. The causal nature of the link between education and obesity has not yet been proven with certainty; however, using data from France we were able to ascertain that the direction of causality appears to run mostly from education to obesity, as the strength of the association is only minimally affected when accounting for reduced educational opportunities for those who are obese in young age. Most of the effect of education on obesity is direct. Small components of the overall effect of education on obesity are mediated by an improved socio-economic status linked to higher levels of education, and by a higher level of education of other family members, associated with an individual's own level of education. The positive effect of education on obesity is likely to be determined by at least three factors: (a) greater access to health-related information and improved ability to handle such information; (b) clearer perception of the risks associated with lifestyle choices; and, (c) improved self-control and consistency of preferences over time. However, it is not just the absolute level of education achieved by an individual that matters, but also how such level of education compares with that of the individual's peers. The higher the individual's education relative to his or her peers', the lower is the probability of the individual being obese
Selecting Indicators for the Quality of Health Promotion, Prevention and Primary Care at the Health Systems Level in OECD Countries by Martin Marshall( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the consensus recommendations of an international expert panel on indicators for health promotion and primary care. Using a structured review process, the panel selected a set of 27 indicators to cover the three key areas health promotion, preventive care and diagnosis and treatment in primary care. The report describes the review process and provides a detailed discussion of the scientific soundness and policy importance of the 27 indicators as follows
Indicators of unemployment and low-wage traps: marginal effective tax rates on employment incomes by G Carone( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper presents results from an on-going joint European Commission / OECD project, aimed at monitoring the direct influence of tax and benefit instruments on household incomes. The project uses and extends OECD tax-benefit models to compute a range of work incentive indicators such as marginal effective tax rates on earned income. This paper provides a methodological background describing these extensions. It also discusses the usefulness of a range of indicators such as net replacement rates and marginal effective tax rates and to what extent they can be used to quantify possible work disincentives. The approaches are illustrated using detailed tax-benefit calculations for 2001 and comparing relevant indicators across 15 EU and 8 non-EU countries. The results presented in this paper permit the identification of family circumstances where (1) financial incentives to increase work are either small or missing altogether; or (2) resources provided by social transfers may be
The Long-Term Care Workforce: Overview and Strategies to Adapt Supply to a Growing Demand by Rie Fujisawa( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This working paper offers an overview of the LTC workforce and reviews country responses to a growing demand for LTC workers. In the context of ageing societies, the importance of long-term care is growing in all OECD countries. In 2005, long-term care expenditure accounted for slightly over 1% of GDP across OECD countries (OECD Health Data 2008), but this is projected to reach between 2% and 4% of GDP by 2050 (Oliveira Martins et al., 2006). Spending on long-term care as a share of GDP rises with the share of the population that is over 80 years old, which is expected to triple from 4 per cent to 11-12 per cent between 2005 and 2050. In addition to ageing, there are other factors likely to affect future spending. Trends in severe disability among elderly populations across 12 OECD countries for which data are available do not show a consistent sign of decline (Lafortune and Balestat, 2007), while the number of elderly that need assistance in carrying out activities of daily living is also growing. Meanwhile, societal changes - notably possible reductions in the importance of informal care due to rising labour market participation by women and declining family size, as well as growing expectations for more responsive, quality health and social-care systems - are creating pressures to improve value for money in long-term care systems. These factors add pressures on the workforce of this highly labour-intensive sector. Adding to this are the difficulties in attracting and retaining caregivers to a physically and mentally gruelling profession
The Future for Low-Educated Workers in Belgium by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The world of work is changing as a result of technological progress, globalisation and population ageing. The future of work holds many opportunities, but also presents distinct risks which tend to be greater for some population sub-groups, including low-educated workers. This report documents how the labour market for low-educated workers in Belgium has evolved in recent years and what the future might hold for them in terms of both job quality and quantity. Based on comparisons with neighbouring countries, the report seeks to provide policy advice to ensure that low-educated workers are not left behind by the changes that lie ahead
The Obesity Epidemic: Analysis of Past and Projected Future Trends in Selected OECD Countries( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper provides an overview of past and projected future trends in adult overweight and obesity inOECD countries. Using individual-level data from repeated cross-sectional national surveys, some of the main determinants and pathways underlying the current obesity epidemic are explored, and possible policy levers for tackling the negative health effect of these trends are identified
The US Physician Workforce : Where Do We Stand? by Richard Cooper( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This review surveys trends in physician supply in the United States from 1980 to the present with particular attention to the participation of International Medical Graduates. It discussed the composition of the physician workforce with regards to the number of family practitioners, specialists, women physicians and the aging of the workforce. Changes in the inflows and outflows of the physician workforce are discussed and, in particular, how international migration, retirement, part-time practice and alternative employment have impacted the physician workforce
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityOrganisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Directorate for Education, Employment, Labour and Social Affairs.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs

Languages
English (31)