WorldCat Identities

Nadkarni, Vinay M.

Overview
Works: 23 works in 26 publications in 1 language and 59 library holdings
Roles: Editor, Contributor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Vinay M Nadkarni
New vistas in patient safety and simulation( Book )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PALS provider manual by American Heart Association( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conducting multicenter research in healthcare simulation: Lessons learned from the INSPIRE network by Adam Cheng( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reporting guidelines for health care simulation research: extensions to the CONSORT and STROBE statements by Research, and Education (INSPIRE) Reporting Guidelines Investigators for the International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A Novel Nonlinear Mathematical Model of Thoracic Wall Mechanics During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Based on a Porcine Model of Cardiac Arrest by ʻAlī Jalālī( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Premedication with neuromuscular blockade and sedation during neonatal intubation is associated with fewer adverse events by for the National Emergency Airway Registry for Neonates (NEAR4NEOS) Investigators( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The number of tracheal intubation attempts matters! A prospective multi-institutional pediatric observational study by For the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI)( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Heliox improves pulmonary mechanics in a pediatric porcine model of induced severe bronchospasm and independent lung mechanical ventilation by Anthony J Orsini( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Current Medication Practice and Tracheal Intubation Safety Outcomes From a Prospective Multicenter Observational Cohort Study*( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objectives: Tracheal intubation in PICUs is often associated with adverse tracheal intubation-associated events. There is a paucity of data regarding medication selection for safe tracheal intubations in PICUs. Our primary objective was to evaluate the association of medication selection on specific tracheal intubation-associated events across PICUs. Design: Prospective observational cohort study. Setting: Nineteen PICUs in North America. Subjects: Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation. Interventions: None. Measurement and Main Results: Using the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children, tracheal intubation quality improvement data were prospectively collected from July 2010 to March 2013. Patient, provider, and practice characteristics including medications and dosages were collected. Adverse tracheal intubation-associated events were defined a priori. A total of 3, 366 primary tracheal intubations were reported. Adverse tracheal intubation-associated events occurred in 593 tracheal intubations (18%). Fentanyl and midazolam were the most commonly used induction medications (64% and 58%, respectively). Neuromuscular blockade was used in 92% of tracheal intubation with the majority using rocuronium (64%) followed by vecuronium (20%). Etomidate and succinylcholine were rarely used (1.6% and 0.7%, respectively). Vagolytics were administered in 37% of tracheal intubations (51% in infants; 28% in> 1 yr old; p <0.001). Ketamine was used in 27% of tracheal intubations but more often for tracheal intubations in patients with unstable hemodynamics (39% vs 25%; p <0.001). However, ketamine use was not associated with lower prevalence of new hypotension (ketamine 8% vs no ketamine 14%; p = 0.08). Conclusions: In this large, pediatric multicenter registry, fentanyl, midazolam, and ketamine were the most commonly used induction agents, and the majority of tracheal intubations involved neuromuscular blockade. Ketamine use was not associated with lower prevalence of hypotension
Incidence and Outcomes of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in PICUs( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objectives: To determine the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in PICUs and subsequent outcomes. Design, Setting, and Patients: Multicenter prospective observational study of children younger than 18 years old randomly selected and intensively followed from PICU admission to hospital discharge in the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network December 2011 to April 2013. Results: Among 10, 078 children enrolled, 139 (1.4%) received cardiopulmonary resuscitation for more than or equal to 1 minute and/or defibrillation. Of these children, 78% attained return of circulation, 45% survived to hospital discharge, and 89% of survivors had favorable neurologic outcomes. The relative incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation events was higher for cardiac patients compared with non-cardiac patients (3.4% vs 0.8%, p <0.001), but survival rate to hospital discharge with favorable neurologic outcome was not statistically different (41% vs 39%, respectively). Shorter duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was associated with higher survival rates: 66% (29/44) survived to hospital discharge after 1-3 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus 28% (9/32) after more than 30 minutes (p <0.001). Among survivors, 90% (26/29) had a favorable neurologic outcome after 1-3 minutes versus 89% (8/9) after more than 30 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusions: These data establish that contemporary PICU cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including long durations of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, results in high rates of survival-to-hospital discharge (45%) and favorable neurologic outcomes among survivors (89%). Rates of survival with favorable neurologic outcomes were similar among cardiac and noncardiac patients. The rigorous prospective, observational study design avoided the limitations of missing data and potential selection biases inherent in registry and administrative data
Increased Occurrence of Tracheal Intubation-Associated Events During Nights and Weekends in the PICU*( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objectives: Adverse tracheal intubation-associated events are common in PICUs. Prior studies suggest provider and practice factors are important contributors to tracheal intubation-associated events. Little is known about how the incidence of tracheal intubation-associated events is affected by the time of day, day of the week, or presence of in-hospital attending-level intensivists. We hypothesize that tracheal intubations occurring during nights and weekends are associated with a higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events. Design: Retrospective observational cohort study. Setting: Twenty international PICUs. Subjects: Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: We analyzed 5, 096 tracheal intubation courses from July 2010 to March 2014 from the prospective multicenter National Emergency Airway Registry for Children. Frequency of a priori - defined tracheal intubation-associated events was the primary outcome. Occurrence of any tracheal intubation-associated events and severe tracheal intubation-associated events were more common during nights (19:00 to 06:59) and weekends compared with weekdays (19% vs 16%, p = 0.01; 7% vs 6%, p = 0.05, respectively). This difference was significant in emergent intubations after adjusting for site-level clustering and patient factors: for any tracheal intubation-associated events: adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.41; p = 0.03; but not significant in nonemergent intubations: adjusted odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.63-1.40; p = 0.75. For emergent intubations, PICUs with home-call attending coverage had a significantly higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events during nights and weekends (adjusted odds ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.66; p = 0.04), and this difference was attenuated in PICUs with in-hospital attending coverage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.91-1.39; p = 0.28). Conclusions: Higher occurrence of tracheal intubation-associated events was observed during nights and weekends. This difference was primarily attributed to emergent intubations. In- hospital attending physician coverage attenuated this discrepancy between weekdays versus nights and weekends but was not fully protective for tracheal intubation-associated events. Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
Use of pressors in the treatment of cardiac arrest by C. F Babbs( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Airways in pediatric and newborn resuscitation by Waldemar Carlo( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Blood Pressure Directed Booster Trainings Improve Intensive Care Unit Provider Retention of Excellent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objectives: Brief, intermittent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training sessions, "Booster Trainings, " improve CPR skill acquisition and short-term retention. The objective of this study was to incorporate arterial blood pressure (ABP) tracings into Booster Trainings to improve CPR skill retention. We hypothesized that ABP-directed CPR "Booster Trainings" would improve intensive care unit (ICU) provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without need for interval retraining. Methods: A CPR manikin creating a realistic relationship between chest compression depth and ABP was used for training/testing. Thirty-six ICU providers were randomized to brief, bedside ABP-directed CPR manikin skill retrainings: (1) Booster Plus (ABP visible during training and testing) versus (2) Booster Alone (ABP visible only during training, not testing) versus (3) control (testing, no intervention). Subjects completed skill tests pretraining (baseline), immediately after training (acquisition), and then retention was assessed at 12 hours, 3 and 6 months. The primary outcome was retention of excellent CPR skills at 3 months. Excellent CPR was defined as systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg or higher and compression rate 100 to 120 per minute. Results: Overall, 14 of 24 (58%) participants acquired excellent CPR skills after their initial training (Booster Plus 75% vs 50% Booster Alone, P = 0.21). Adjusted for age, ABP-trained providers were 5.2× more likely to perform excellent CPR after the initial training (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3-21.2; P = 0.02), and to retain these skills at 12 hours (adjusted odds ratio, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.3-14.9; P = 0.018) and 3 months (adjusted odds ratio, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.2-13.9; P = 0.023) when compared to baseline performance. Conclusions: The ABP-directed CPR booster trainings improved ICU provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without the need for interval retraining
Better Nurse Staffing and Nurse Work Environments Associated With Increased Survival of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: Although nurses are the most likely first responders to witness an in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and provide treatment, little research has been undertaken to determine what features of nursing are related to cardiac arrest outcomes. Objectives: To determine the association between nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and IHCA survival. Research Design: Cross-sectional study of data from: (1) the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation database; (2) the University of Pennsylvania Multi-State Nursing Care and and Patient Safety; and (3) the American Hospital Association annual survey. Logistic regression models were used to determine the association of the features of nursing and IHCA survival to discharge after adjusting for hospital and patient characteristics. Subjects: A total of 11, 160 adult patients aged 18 and older between 2005 and 2007 in 75 hospitals in 4 states (Pennsylvania, Florida, California, and New Jersey). Results: Each additional patient per nurse on medical-surgical units was associated with a 5% lower likelihood of surviving IHCA to discharge (odds ratio=0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-0.99). Further, patients cared for in hospitals with poor work environments had a 16% lower likelihood of IHCA survival (odds ratio=0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.99) than patients cared for in hospitals with better work environments. Conclusions: Better work environments and decreased patient-to-nurse ratios on medical-surgical units are associated with higher odds of patient survival after an IHCA. These results add to a large body of literature suggesting that outcomes are better when nurses have a more reasonable workload and work in good hospital work environments. Improving nurse working conditions holds promise for improving survival following IHCA. Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
Age, Sex, and Hospital Factors Are Associated With the Duration of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Hospitalized Patients Who Do Not Experience Sustained Return of Spontaneous Circulation( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: Variability in the duration of attempted in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is high, but the factors influencing termination of CPR efforts are unknown. Methods and Results: We examined the association between patient and hospital characteristics and CPR duration in 45 500 victims of in-hospital cardiac arrest who did not experience return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and who were enrolled in the Get With the Guidelines registry between 2001 and 2010. In a secondary analysis, we performed analyses in 46 168 victims of in-hospital cardiac arrest who experienced ROSC. We used ordered logistic regression to identify factors associated with CPR duration. Analyses were conducted by tertile of CPR duration (tertiles: ROSC group: 2 to 7, 8 to 17, and 18 to 120 minutes; no-ROSC group: 2 to 16, 17 to 26, 27 to 120 minutes). In those without ROSC, younger age (aged 18 to 40 versus>65 years; odds ratio [OR] 1.81; 95% CI 1.69 to 1.95; P <0.001), female sex (OR 1.05; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.09; P =0.005), ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (OR 1.50; 95% CI 1.42 to 1.58; P <0.001), and the need to place an invasive airway (OR 2.59; 95% CI 2.46 to 2.72; P <0.001) were associated with longer CPR duration. In those with ROSC, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.85 to 0.93; P <0.001) and witnessed events (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.82 to 0.91; P <0.001) were associated with shorter duration. Conclusions: Age and sex were associated with attempted CPR duration in patients who do not experience ROSC after in-hospital cardiac arrest but not in those who experience ROSC. Understanding the mechanism of these interactions may help explain variability in outcomes for in-hospital cardiac arrest
Anterior-posterior thoracic force-deflection characteristics measured during cardiopulmonary resuscitation : comparison to post-mortem human subject data by Kristy B Arbogast( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Failure of Invasive Airway Placement on the First Attempt Is Associated With Progression to Cardiac Arrest in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Compromise*( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the proportion of acute respiratory compromise events in hospitalized pediatric patients progressing to cardiopulmonary arrest, and the clinical factors associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest. We hypothesized that failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt (defined as multiple attempts at tracheal intubation, and/or laryngeal mask airway placement, and/or the creation of a new tracheostomy or cricothyrotomy) is independently associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest. Design: Multicenter, international registry of pediatric in-hospital acute respiratory compromise. Setting: American Heart Association's Get with the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry (2000-2014). Patients: Children younger than 18 years with an index (first) acute respiratory compromise event. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 2, 210 index acute respiratory compromise events, 64% required controlled ventilation, 26% had return of spontaneous ventilation, and 10% progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. There were 762 acute respiratory compromise events (34%) that did not require an invasive airway, 1, 185 acute respiratory compromise events (54%) with successful invasive airway placement on the first attempt, and 263 acute respiratory compromise events (12%) with failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt. After adjusting for confounding variables, failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt was independently associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest (adjusted odds ratio 1.8 [95% CIs, 1.2-2.6]). Conclusions: More than 1 in 10 hospitalized pediatric patients who experienced an acute respiratory compromise event progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. Failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt is independently associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest. Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
Early Head CT Findings Are Associated With Outcomes After Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest*( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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New vistas in patient safety and simulation
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English (23)