WorldCat Identities

Brands, Hal 1983-

Overview
Works: 39 works in 135 publications in 1 language and 10,573 library holdings
Genres: History  Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Hal Brands
Latin America's Cold War by Hal Brands( )

16 editions published between 2009 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,888 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this book, the first to take an international perspective on the postwar decades in the region, Hal Brands sets out to explain what exactly happened in Latin America during the Cold War, and why it was so traumatic." "Tracing the tumultuous course of regional affairs from the late 1940s through the early 1990s, Latin America's Cold War delves into the myriad crises and turning points of the period--the Cuban revolution and its aftermath; the recurring cycles of insurgency and counter-insurgency; the emergence of currents like the National Security Doctrine, liberation theology, and dependency theory; the rise and demise of a hemispheric diplomatic challenge to U.S
From Berlin to Baghdad : America's search for purpose in the post-Cold War world by Hal Brands( )

9 editions published between 2007 and 2015 in English and held by 1,869 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"From Berlin to Baghdad dissects the numerous unsuccessful attempts to devise a new grand foreign policy strategy that could match the moral clarity and political efficacy of the containment strategy of the Cold War. The book charts the often onerous course of recent American foreign policy, from the triumph of the fall of the Berlin Wall to the tragedies of 9/11 and beyond, analyzing the nations search for purpose in the face of the daunting complexities of the post-Cold War world."--Jacket
What good is grand strategy? : power and purpose in American statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush by Hal Brands( )

13 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 1,774 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Grand strategy is one of the most widely used and abused concepts in the foreign policy lexicon. In this important book, Hal Brands explains why grand strategy is a concept that is so alluring--and so elusive--to those who make American statecraft. He explores what grand strategy is, why it is so essential, and why it is so hard to get right amid the turbulence of global affairs and the chaos of domestic politics. At a time when "grand strategy" is very much in vogue, Brands critically appraises just how feasible that endeavor really is. Brands takes a historical approach to this subject, examining how four presidential administrations, from that of Harry S. Truman to that of George W. Bush, sought to "do" grand strategy at key inflection points in the history of modern U.S. foreign policy. As examples ranging from the early Cold War to the Reagan years to the War on Terror demonstrate, grand strategy can be an immensely rewarding undertaking--but also one that is full of potential pitfalls on the long road between conception and implementation. Brands concludes by offering valuable suggestions for how American leaders might approach the challenges of grand strategy in the years to come
The power of the past : history and statecraft by Hal Brands( )

11 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 1,184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leading scholars and policymakers explore how history influences foreign policy and offer insights on how the study of the past can more usefully serve the present. History, with its insights, analogies, and narratives, is central to the ways that the United States interacts with the world. Historians and policymakers, however, rarely engage one another as effectively or fruitfully as they might. This book bridges that divide, bringing together leading scholars and policymakers to address the essential questions surrounding the history-policy relationship including Mark Lawrence on the numerous, and often contradictory, historical lessons that American observers have drawn from the Vietnam War; H.W. Brands on the role of analogies in U.S. policy during the Persian Gulf crisis and war of 1990 91; and Jeremi Suri on Henry Kissinger's powerful use of history. -- Amazon.com
Dealing with political ferment in Latin America : the populist revival, the emergence of the center, and implications for U.S. policy by Hal Brands( )

6 editions published between 2009 and 2014 in English and held by 604 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The author argues that references to a uniform 'left turn' in the region are misleading, and that Latin America is actually witnessing a dynamic competition between two very different forms of governance. Represented by leaders like Hugo Chávez, Evo Morales, and others, radical populism emphasizes the politics of grievance and a penchant for extreme solutions. Moderate, centrist governance can be found in countries like Chile, Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and Uruguay. It stresses diplomatic pragmatism, the protection of democratic practices, and the need to blend macroeconomic responsibility with a social conscience. To the extent that the United States can strengthen the centrists while limiting the damage caused by radical populism, the author argues it can promote integral growth, democratic stability, and effective security cooperation in Latin America. A clear understanding of the trends discussed is essential to devising appropriate U.S. policies toward that region."--Page iii
Mexico's narco-insurgency and U.S. counterdrug policy by Hal Brands( )

9 editions published between 2009 and 2014 in English and held by 595 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On June 30, 2008, President George W. Bush signed into law the Merida Initiative, a 3-year, $1.4 billion counterdrug assistance program for Mexico and Central America. The Merida Initiative is representative of the supply-side approach to the narcotics trade that has long characterized U.S. drug control policy. Unfortunately, this approach to the drug trade is unlikely to achieve the desired results in Mexico. For the Merida Initiative to be fully successful, the United States must therefore forge a more holistic, better-integrated approach to the drug trade. Implementing such a strategy will not be easy, but it will be central to improving U.S. counternarcotics policy and ensuring that the Merida Initiative is more than a mere palliative for the problems associated with the Mexican drug trade
Crime, violence, and the crisis in Guatemala : a case study in the erosion of the state by Hal Brands( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 540 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guatemala is currently experiencing a full-blown crisis of the democratic state. An unholy trinity of criminal elements: international drug traffickers, domestically based organized crime syndicates, and youth gangs, is effectively waging a form of irregular warfare against government institutions, with devastating consequences. The police, the judiciary, and entire local and departmental governments are rife with criminal infiltrators; murder statistics have surpassed civil-war levels in recent years; criminal operatives brazenly assassinate government officials and troublesome members of the political class; and broad swaths of territory are now effectively under the control of criminal groups. Guatemala's weak institutions have been unable to contain this violence, leading to growing civic disillusion and causing a marked erosion in the authority and legitimacy of the government.--
Dilemmas of Brazilian grand strategy by Hal Brands( )

8 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in English and held by 537 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This monograph analyzes Brazilian grand strategy under President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. During Lula's nearly 8 years in office, he has pursued a multipronged grand strategy aimed at hastening the transition from unipolarity and Western economic hegemony to a multipolar order in which international rules, norms, and institutions are more favorable to Brazilian interests. Lula has done so by emphasizing three diplomatic strategies : soft balancing against the United States, building coalitions to magnify Brazilian negotiation power, and seeking to position Brazil as the leader of a more united South America. This strategy has successfully raised Brazil's profile and increased its diplomatic flexibility, but it has also exposed the country to four strategic dilemmas that could complicate or undermine its ascent. First, issues like poor infrastructure, rampant crime, and excessive tax and regulation of the economy may impede Brazil from attaining strong economic growth and social cohesion necessary to sustain such an ambitious strategic project. Second, in dealing with South America, the Brazilian political class has not reconciled its desire for regional leadership with its unwillingness to share power or economic benefits with its neighbors. As a result, many of these countries perceive Brazil's diplomacy to be domineering and its trade policies to be narrowly self-interested, and they have thus refused to support Lula's bid for regional preeminence. Third, at the global level, the long-term cohesion and effectiveness of Lula's various diplomatic partnerships is open to question. Fourth, while Lula has maintained good relations with Washington, his grand strategy unavoidably entails a growing risk of conflict issues like Iran, trade policy, and the U.S. diplomatic and military role in Latin America. Looking ahead, the efficacy of Brazilian grand strategy - and its consequences for U.S. interests - will be contingent on how Lula's successors address these dilemmas
Making the unipolar moment : U.S. foreign policy and the rise of the post-Cold War order by Hal Brands( Book )

9 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 491 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the late 1970s, the United States often seemed to be a superpower in decline. Battered by crises and setbacks around the globe, its post-World War II international leadership appeared to be draining steadily away. Yet just over a decade later, by the early 1990s, America's global primacy had been reasserted in dramatic fashion. The Cold War had ended with Washington and its allies triumphant; democracy and free markets were spreading like never before. The United States was now enjoying its "unipolar moment"--An era in which Washington faced no near-term rivals for global power and influence, and one in which the defining feature of international politics was American dominance. How did this remarkable turnaround occur, and what role did U.S. foreign policy play in causing it? In this important book, Hal Brands uses recently declassified archival materials to tell the story of American resurgence. Brands weaves together the key threads of global change and U.S. policy from the late 1970s through the early 1990s, examining the Cold War struggle with Moscow, the rise of a more integrated and globalized world economy, the rapid advance of human rights and democracy, and the emergence of new global challenges like Islamic extremism and international terrorism. Brands reveals how deep structural changes in the international system interacted with strategies pursued by Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George H.W. Bush to usher in an era of reinvigorated and in many ways unprecedented American primacy. Making the Unipolar Moments provides an indispensable account of how the post-Cold War order that we still inhabit came to be. -- from dust jacket
American grand strategy in the age of Trump by Hal Brands( )

10 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 383 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

American foreign policy is in a state of upheaval. The rise of Donald Trump and his "America First" platform have created more uncertainty about America's role in the world than at any time in recent decades. From the South China Sea, to the Middle East, to the Baltics and Eastern Europe, the geopolitical challenges to U.S. power and influence seem increasingly severe--and America's responses to those challenges seem increasingly unsure. Questions that once had widely accepted answers are now up for debate. What role should the United States play in the world? Can, and should, America continue to pursue an engaged an assertive strategy in global affairs? In this book, a leading scholar of grand strategy helps to make sense of the headlines and the upheaval by providing sharp yet nuanced assessments of the most critical issues in American grand strategy today. Hal Brands asks, and answers, such questions as: Has America really blundered aimlessly in the world since the end of the Cold War, or has its grand strategy actually been mostly sensible and effective? Is America in terminal decline, or can it maintain its edge in a harsher and more competitive environment? Did the Obama administration pursue a policy of disastrous retrenchment, or did it execute a shrewd grand strategy focused on maximizing U.S. power for the long term? Does Donald Trump's presidency mean that American internationalism is dead? What type of grand strategy might America pursue in the age of Trump and after? What would happen if the United States radically pulled back from the world, as many leading academics--and, at certain moments, the current president--have advocated? How much military power does America need in the current international environment? Grappling with these kinds of issues is essential to understanding the state of America's foreign relations today and what path the country might take in the years ahead. At a time when American grand strategy often seems consumed by crisis, this collection of essays provides an invaluable guide to thinking about both the recent past and the future of America's role in the world
The promise and pitfalls of grand strategy by Hal Brands( )

6 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 316 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What is "grand strategy," and why is it seemingly so important and so difficult? This monograph explores the concept of grand strategy as it has developed over the past several decades. It explains why the concept is so ubiquitous in discussions of present-day foreign policy, examines why American officials often find the formulation of a successful grand strategy to be such an exacting task, and explores the ways in which having a grand strategy can be both useful and problematic. It illustrates these points via an analysis of two key periods in modern American grand strategy -- the Truman years at the outset of the Cold War, and the Nixon-Kissinger years in the late 1960s and 1970s -- and provides several suggestions for how U.S. officials might approach the challenges of grand strategy in the 21st century
The limits of offshore balancing by Hal Brands( )

3 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Is offshore balancing the right grand strategy for America? Is it time for Washington to roll back the vast system of overseas security commitments and forward military deployments that have anchored its international posture since World War II? This monograph argues that the answer to these questions is no. Offshore balancing represents the preferred grand strategy among many leading international-relations 'realists, ' who argue that significant geopolitical retrenchment can actually improve America's strategic position while slashing the costs of its foreign policy. The reality, however, is rather different. The probable benefits of offshore balancing -- both financial and geopolitical -- are frequently exaggerated, while the likely disadvantages and dangers are more severe than its proponents acknowledge. In all likelihood, adopting this strategy would not allow America to achieve more security and influence at a lower price. The more plausible results would be to dissipate U.S. influence, to court heightened insecurity and instability, and to expose the nation to greater long-range risks and costs"--Publisher's web site
Crime, violence, and the crisis in Guatemala : a case study in the erosion of the state by Hal Brands( Book )

7 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Guatemala is currently experiencing a full-blown crisis of the democratic state. An unholy trinity of criminal elements: international drug traffickers, domestically based organized crime syndicates, and youth gangs, is effectively waging a form of irregular warfare against government institutions, with devastating consequences. The police, the judiciary, and entire local and departmental governments are rife with criminal infiltrators; murder statistics have surpassed civil-war levels in recent years; criminal operatives brazenly assassinate government officials and troublesome members of the political class; and broad swaths of territory are now effectively under the control of criminal groups. Guatemala's weak institutions have been unable to contain this violence, leading to growing civic disillusion and causing a marked erosion in the authority and legitimacy of the government."--Page v
American Grand Strategy and the Liberal Order : Continuity, Change, and Options for the Future by Hal Brands( Book )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Since the end of World War II, the United States has pursued its global interests through a policy of consistent but evolving support for a liberal international order. In recent years, however, international challenges--such as the rise of new powers, climate change, and failed states--have led to an intensified debate about the future of the U.S. relationship with that order. To inform this debate, this Perspective identifies areas of continuity and change in the historical U.S. approach to international order. It then outlines four alternative strategies that the United States might pursue vis-à-vis the liberal order in the future and proposes criteria for choosing among these options"--Publisher's description
What Good Is Grand Strategy? : Power and Purpose in American Statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush by Hal Brands( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Grand strategy is one of the most widely used and abused concepts in the foreign policy lexicon. In this important book, Hal Brands explains why grand strategy is a concept that is so alluring—and so elusive—to those who make American statecraft. He explores what grand strategy is, why it is so essential, and why it is so hard to get right amid the turbulence of global affairs and the chaos of domestic politics. At a time when "grand strategy" is very much in vogue, Brands critically appraises just how feasible that endeavor really is.Brands takes a historical approach to this subject, examining how four presidential administrations, from that of Harry S. Truman to that of George W. Bush, sought to "do" grand strategy at key inflection points in the history of modern U.S. foreign policy. As examples ranging from the early Cold War to the Reagan years to the War on Terror demonstrate, grand strategy can be an immensely rewarding undertaking—but also one that is full of potential pitfalls on the long road between conception and implementation. Brands concludes by offering valuable suggestions for how American leaders might approach the challenges of grand strategy in the years to come
LESSONS OF TRAGEDY : statecraft and the preservation of world order by Hal Brands( Book )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Latin America's Cold War by Hal Brands( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Promise and pitfalls of grand strategy (enlarged edition) by Hal Brands( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Was the Rise of ISIS Inevitable? by Hal Brands( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dealing with allies in decline : alliance management and U.S. strategy in an era of global power shifts by Hal Brands( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

America's traditional allies are in decline. Unfortunately, the distribution of global economic and military power has shifted significantly since the mid-1990s, and key U.S. geopolitical partners have suffered. So how should the United States respond to this situation? Contrary to some recent expert and political discussion, it would be a historic mistake to abandon or deliberately weaken U.S. alliances, given the tremendous value that they have added--and still add--to American statecraft. What U.S. officials should do, rather, is to adapt their alliance management strategy in ways that mitigate and help offset the geopolitical effects of allied decline. To this end, this report offers a strategic framework for alliance management encompassing 11 recommendations. These recommendations are diverse, but the common threads are strengthening and extracting maximum utility from current alliances, while also building new connections, relationships, and partnerships to reflect the changing distribution of global power. There is no single policy the United States can pursue to reverse or fully offset the relative decline of its core allies. But by taking a broad array of steps that cohere around these basic ideas, the United States can still compete effectively in a world in which its allies' strengths are significant, even if reduced from what they were before
 
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Latin America's Cold War
Covers
From Berlin to Baghdad : America's search for purpose in the post-Cold War world
Alternative Names
Brands, Henry 1983-

Languages
English (114)