WorldCat Identities

Van Onselen, Peter

Overview
Works: 40 works in 69 publications in 1 language and 3,894 library holdings
Genres: Biographies 
Roles: Author
Classifications: JQ4092, 324.0994
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Peter Van Onselen
Howard's end : the unravelling of a government by Peter Van Onselen( )

6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 895 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"From the co-writer of John Winston Howard, the definitive biography of the Prime Minister, comes Howard's End, which takes us behind the scenes of both parties on the announcement of the election campaign and traces the stunning collapse of the Coalition in its last year in government." -- BACK COVER
Battleground : why the Liberal Party shirtfronted Tony Abbott by Wayne Errington( )

6 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 888 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tony Abbott came to office lauded as the most effective leader of the opposition since Whitlam, but the signs of an imperfect transition to the prime ministership would soon emerge. Why did Abbott fail to grow into the job to which he had aspired for decades? Backbenchers complained about the leader's office, the lack of access, front benchers leaked cabinet processes to the media
The Turnbull gamble by Wayne Errington( )

4 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 856 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Liberal Party took a risk replacing Tony Abbott with Malcolm Turnbull. They had seen how voters could turn when the ALP tore down a first-term prime minister. But MPs were desperate, having witnessed the collapse in polling during Abbott's prime ministership. By the time Turnbull called the election it was still unclear what he wanted to achieve. He seemed strangely underprepared for a job that he had fought so long to win. Turnbull leads a party whose culture he doesn't share. While the narrow election victory may have justified the gamble to place him in office, does Turnbull have the leadership qualities needed to break the cycle of division and instability ofthe last decade?
Professionals or part-timers? : major party senators in Australia by Peter Van Onselen( )

4 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 806 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

“While the minor party and independent senators might attract media attention, the overwhelming majority of Australia’s upper house members are affiliated with the major political parties. These senators are highly partisan: they are dependent on party for the re-election and play a potentially vital role in assisting their parties to secure the maximum number of House of Representatives seats, acting as ‘shock troops’ in marginal seat campaigning. How does this impact the way these senators go about their business? How do they serve their party in the pursuit of lower house seats, the result of which determines who forms government? Professionals or Part-timers? Examines the electoral professionalism of major party senators, as well as how they deal with the sometimes competing interests of factionalism and personal ambition.”--Back cover
John Winston Howard by Wayne Errington( Book )

9 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and held by 232 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Errington and van Onselen contend that Howard is the first professional politician the country has seen, and assess the impact he has made on modern politics, government and the country." "John Winston Howard is a revealing study of the nature of modern politics. Crucially, it offers an insightful understanding of the John Howard who lies - and is mostly missed - between the public vitriol and the ungainly praise that passes as analysis."--Jacket
Liberals and power : the road ahead by Peter Van Onselen( Book )

3 editions published between 2008 and 2014 in English and held by 134 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With November 2007's federal election loss, and with Labor running all state and territory governments, the Liberal Party has been forced to re-think its raison d'être. The transition from John Howard to Brendan Nelson's leadership has been anything but smooth, with much destabilising work happening from within the Party. This book brings together respected commentators and politicians such as Gerard Henderson, Robert Manne, Tony Abbott, Wayne Errington and George Brandis who examine, among other issues, the contemporary debate over liberalism, the Howard legacy, and the battle for the heart and soul of Australia. Liberal leader Brendan Nelson and Shadow Treasurer Malcolm Turnbull contribute chapters on their vision for Australia, and their plan to bring the Liberals back from the wilderness. This book is an invaluable analysis of the challenges, pitfalls and opportunities that lie ahead for the Liberal Party. -- Publisher details
Gamble by Wayne Errington( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Battleground by Wayne E Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Let Every Stage Advance : Policy Ideas for Australia's Fiftieth Parliament by Laurence Coleman( )

2 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"..."This is an advance preview of the policies that will shape our future. We are looking at the issues that will unite and divide us in elections down the track," Professor Freshwater said. Labor's Kate Thwaites, elected as the Federal member for Jagajaga in 2019, writes of the need for the kind of journalism that exposes what some would rather keep hidden, arguing for tax incentives for public interest journalism. NSW Greens Senator Dr Mehreen Faruqi, elected in 2018, has issued a call to guarantee free TAFE and university education for all Australians throughout their lives. Victorian Liberal Senator David Van, elected in 2019, argues that 'policy challenge number one' is 'getting an energy mix that is at once reliable, cheap and with no or low emissions'. The publication also includes essays from Tim Ayres, Raff Ciccone, Patrick Gorman, Helen Haines, Matt O'Sullivan, Alicia Payne, Marielle Smith and Amanda Stoker...' -- publisher's website
John Winston Howard by Wayne Errington( Recording )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

John Winston Howard : the biography by Wayne Errington( )

2 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1996, when John Howard wrested the prime ministership from Paul Keating, many people wrote off his election win as an aberration. More than ten years later, he is on the cusp of leading the Liberal Party into another election. John Winston Howard is a frank and engrossing portrait of the Prime Minister. For the first time ever, in unprecedented and extensive interviews conducted by Wayne Errington and Peter van Onselen with Howard's family, friends, political supporters and detractors, we get a rare insight into the man and the government he runs. The result is a portrait of how Team Howard operates, and why it has been so successful. Errington and van Onselen contend that Howard is the first professional politician the country has seen, and assess the impact he has made on modern politics, government and the country
John Howard the Great Communicator: No, Really! by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The rough and tumble of John Howard’s public school education left him with an electorally appealing ordinariness in a party renowned for a born to rule attitude. Howard was not brought up with the sense of noblesse oblige of an establishment figure such as Malcolm Fraser. His father owned a small petrol station and John Howard worked there on weekends while at school. Howard’s background may have made it more likely for him to accept the rhetoric of economic liberalism – self-reliance, markets and rising tides. It also helped shape his approach to political rhetoric. Howard’s rhetoric, while not especially inspirational, is well crafted. It has assisted in cultivating his image of ordinariness. Once classified as a poor public speaker, Howard has grown in the Prime Ministership to present a carefully nuanced image. This paper identifies why Howard’s rhetoric is successful: thorough preparation for an ‘on message’ delivery of information, his adept handling of interviews and his ability to present a compassionate persona in times of tragedy, such as following the Port Arthur shootings and Bali bombings. Howard’s political rhetoric is compared with other modern Australian leaders. While many Labor leaders have a penchant for stirring speeches, Howard has a record of electorally appealing prose
The Howard government's industrial relations information campaign and the limits to incumbency advantage by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The concept of the permanent campaign was recently reviewed by American political scientists Mann and Ornstein (2000). At the 2005 ANZCA conference we discussed the extent to which the permanent campaign had come to Australia, using communications strategies at the 2004 federal election as a case study. This paper analyses the Howard government's $55m information campaign to sell its new industrial relations (IR) reforms. The expensive advertising campaign was spread across newspapers, television channels, radio stations and even internet sites. It was widely criticised by media professionals, politicians and interest groups alike. The IR information campaign was an example of permanent campaigning in so far as it was an overtly partisan information campaign in the middle of an electoral cycle. However, it also revealed the limitations of incumbency advantage. Public anger over the plethora of taxpayer funded IR advertisements was symptomatic of declining public trust in politicians not to partake in overtly partisan activities. It may be that non-partisan government advertising that genuinely informs the public of initiatives and outcomes is of more political benefit to a government than overtly partisan campaigns such as the recent IR campaign
The US Presidential Model of democracy will fail in Afghanistan by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2005 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Evaluating the extent of John Howards political genius by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Opinion on the sources of the Howard government's political success remains polarised. Some see political genius operating: ruthless pragmatism and a centrally controlled, disciplined machine permanently in campaign mode. Others see only sheer luck - a prime minister and government that would have been short-lived and little remembered were it not for the September 11 attacks and the MV Tampa episodes as the 2001 election drew near. We argue that Howard has had his share of good and bad luck, but has also shown high levels of discipline and political learning. He learned the right lessons from his first, unsuccessful leadership period and John Hewson’s 1993 'unloseable election'. He also learned from many early mistakes his government made, including losing a series of ministerial colleagues, and increasing nursing home fees among other policy blunders. More recent policy developments employ a range of political and bureaucratic resources to ensure that the government balances consistent references to the national interest with carefully selected appeals to sectional interests. This is, however, a political balancing act that can quickly become unstuck, leaving Howard or his successor with an exhausted supply of political capital were, for example, new industrial relations laws to test the electorate’s patience
The permanent campaign comes to Australia: Communication strategies in the 2004 federal election by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2005 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Making his first speech to Liberal Party MPs after his victory in the October 2004 Australian federal election, Prime Minister John Howard said that he was ‘a great believer in perpetual campaigning,’ and that the government campaign to win the next election had already begun. The concept of the permanent campaign is important to understanding modern political communication. While an increasing number of voters are claiming to be making up their mind who to vote for in the last week of the formal election campaign, they are influenced in their decision by political messages received well before the formal campaign period. The 2004 election displayed many features of permanent campaigning; in particular the advantage permanent campaigning affords the government over the opposition. Modern campaign methods such as focus groups, qualitative polling, voter databases, and strategic use of Senate resources for House races, are used on a permanent basis to build a communications strategy. The resources of the state, including government advertising, postal and office entitlements of members of parliament, are used to research and communicate with the electorate. While many of these techniques have been under development while also being in use for some time, it is only recently that they have been successfully coordinated to the extent that we can now say that the permanent campaign has reached Australia
Elective Bicameralism and Major Party Senators in Australia by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Australia's strong elective bicameralism brings with it a set of major party Senate members whose roles are shaped more by electoral design and partisan interests than institutional expectations. The electoral system changes of 1949 and subsequently, particularly the 1984 changes, has had a profound effect on the behaviour of major party Senators. This paper highlights that changes to the Senate's electoral system have forced greater dependence by major party Senators on their paity for election. Party-dependent major party Senators, with a lack of Senate-based electoral demands on their time, are well placed to act as servants of their parties, maximising the electoral prospects of candidates for the House of Representatives. This functioning by major party Senators, known as 'duty senatorship’, has not always been practised. From federation to today the Australian Senate's electoral system has undergone significant changes, and those changes have created the possibility of roles for major party Senators in line with electoral-professionalism amongst major parties
The Howard government's industrial relations information campaign and the limits to incumbency advantage by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The concept of the permanent campaign was recently reviewed by American political scientists Mann and Ornstein (2000). At the 2005 ANZCA conference we discussed the extent to which the permanent campaign had come to Australia, using communications strategies at the 2004 federal election as a case study. This paper analyses the Howard government's $55m information campaign to sell its new industrial relations (IR) reforms. The expensive advertising campaign was spread across newspapers, television channels, radio stations and even internet sites. It was widely criticised by media professionals, politicians and interest groups alike. The IR information campaign was an example of permanent campaigning in so far as it was an overtly partisan information campaign in the middle of an electoral cycle. However, it also revealed the limitations of incumbency advantage. Public anger over the plethora of taxpayer funded IR advertisements was symptomatic of declining public trust in politicians not to partake in overtly partisan activities. It may be that non-partisan government advertising that genuinely informs the public of initiatives and outcomes is of more political benefit to a government than overtly partisan campaigns such as the recent IR campaign
From Vitriolic Criticism to Ungainly Praise: Locating John Howard's Political Success by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2007 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Australian Senators and State Resources: Ethical Questions of Usage by Peter Van Onselen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Australian Senate is a unique upper house. Its powers are commensurate to those of the House of Representatives, with the exception of originating money bills. Members are elected according to a ticket based proportional representation (PR) system. It is this electoral system which gives major political parties certainty of representation. Major party Senators are largely made up of former central party operatives, the same end of the major parties predominantly responsible for Senators' preselections. The party experience of Senate candidates combined with dependence on their political party for election, builds significant partisanship. Major party Senators' perform an important campaign role, largely operating out of marginal House of Representatives electorates. They overwhelmingly locate their electorate offices in marginal seats or seats held by the opposing major party. Their electorate staff and parliamentary entitlements are devoted towards the election or re-election of their party's candidates and MPs in marginal seats. Both of Australia's major political parties term such party prescribed activity 'duty senatorship'. Duty Senator activities personify electoral-professionalism by Australian major parties. This paper outlines the resources available to major party Senators to perform partisan campaigning roles as well as their role within major party organizations when campaigning. The ethical justifiability of taxpayer funded state resources being used for partisan advantage is questionable given that partisan advantage does not usually serve the public interest. The use of major party Senators for House of Representatives campaigning also entrenches major party dominance of the lower house, contributing to the exclusion of diversity in Australian government
 
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John Winston Howard
Covers
John Winston HowardLiberals and power : the road ahead
Alternative Names
Onselen, Peter van

Peter van Onselen académicu australianu

Peter van Onselen Australian academic and journalist

Peter van Onselen australischer Akademiker

Languages
English (40)