WorldCat Identities

Furman, Jason

Overview
Works: 28 works in 48 publications in 1 language and 2,320 library holdings
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: RA395.A3, 362.10973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jason Furman
Who has the cure? Hamilton Project ideas on health care ( )
8 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,295 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Emphasizes the importance of universal health care and looks at alternatives for achieving universal health care coverage that also improves efficiency in the health care industry and provides proposals to improve the effectiveness and affordability of health care, including incomerelated costsharing, expanding preventive care, and reforming Medicare's prescription drug benefit"Provided by publisher
Path to prosperity Hamilton Project ideas on income security, education, and taxes by Jason Furman( )
8 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 576 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Focuses on three key criteria for fostering broadly shared economic growth: enhancing economic security, building a highly skilled work force, and reforming the tax system. Proposals include reforming unemployment insurance, improving incentives for retirement saving, building quality into each level of education, and simplifying taxation and making it more progressive"--Provided by publisher
An economic strategy to address climate change and promote energy security ( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The related issues of climate change and energy security are now generally accepted as major challenges. U.S. greenhouse gas emissions contribute to climate change while its reliance on oil reduces its economic and national security. To tackle both problems, the United States must substantially reduce its consumption of fossil fuels. This paper presents a three-part strategy for addressing climate change and promoting energy security. First, the government should price carbon and oil correctly so that the private sector has an incentive to reduce their use. Second, the government should increase and refocus public investments on basic research and on long-run speculative energy technologies. Finally, the United States should lead by example and engage major emitting nations in an international response to climate change" -- abstract (p.2)
How the individual accounts in the President's new plan would work : plan would allow individuals to mortgage half of their Social Security benefit by Jason Furman( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Economic crises : evidence and insights from East Asia by Jason Furman( )
3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
If, when, how a primer on fiscal stimulus by Douglas W Elmendorf( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Expansion in HSA tax breaks is larger--and more problematic--than previously understood by Jason Furman( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
What the new Trustees' report shows about social security by Jason Furman( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The impact of the president's proposal on social security solvency and the budget by Jason Furman( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A strategy for American power : energy, climate, and national security by Sharon Burke( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The United States is engaged in a new war, and it is a war like no other in our history. Today, we are at war with the gas pump and the power plant - and the gas pump and the power plant, for the most part, are winning. These strange foes can be explained in a handful of numbers: 22 million : Barrels of oil Americans consume every day. 60 percent : U.S. oil demand met by imports. 96 percent : Cars on U.S. roads that rely on oil products. Two-thirds: Global oil reserves in the Middle East. 46 percent : Forecast increase in global oil demand by 2030. 50 percent : U.S. electricity that comes from coal-fired power plants. 200 years: How long America's coal reserves would last at current rates of consumption. 70 percent : Growth of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions between 1970 and 2004. 70 -90 percent : Approximate greenhouse gas emissions the United States would have to cut in the next 40 years to avoid the worst effects of climate change. These numbers add up to a tremendous vulnerability. The United States is dependent on geopolitically problematic and polluting oil, and the most likely substitute, coal-fired electricity, is even worse for the Earth's climate, with grave implications for future national security."--Introd
Why the president's social security proposals could ultimately lead to the unraveling of social security by Jason Furman( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The promise of progressive cost consciousness in health-care reform by Jason Furman( )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Americans are frustrated with the unaffordability of health insurance, the effectiveness of health care, and the rising number of uninsured. One important contribution to all of these challenges is the increased insulation of Americans from the cost of their care. In 1965, roughly half of health-care expenses were paid out of pocket by patients; by 2006, that figure had declined to just 13 percent - lower than the average of other high-income OECD countries. One-size-fits-all high deductible policies associated with Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) require costly tax breaks for the most affluent while unnecessarily increasing financial and health risks for low- and moderate-income families. Instead, any expansions of cost sharing should be based on the evidence, chiefly the RAND Health Insurance Experiment and subsequent research. The RAND experiment found that cost sharing, if related to a family's income, could reduce health spending by an average of 31 percent without any worse health outcomes. Subsequent research finds that the savings could be even greater. This paper proposes a template for a progressive cost sharing plan that would require typical families to pay half of their health costs until they reached 7.5 percent of their income; low-income families would not have any cost sharing. The analysis shows that this template could reduce total health spending by 13 to 30 percent, reducing premiums by 22 to 34 pervent without hurting health outcomes. Moreover, low- and moderate-income families would face less cost sharing than they do under typical plans today while the premium savings would be more than enough to compensate midde- and upper-income familites for the modest increase in their exposure to small risks. Every family would have an affordable limit on their out-of-pocket payments, in contrast to the situation today, where may families have insurance policies that expose them to unlimited cost sharing. In addition, the paper suggests the potential inclusion of evidence-based exceptions for highly valuable preventive care and chronic disease treatments as well as other mechanisms to protect the chronically ill"--Abstract (p.2)
Essays on monetary economics by Jason Furman( )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Tax cuts vs. spending increases : is there a basis for chairman Greenspan's preference for tax cuts? by Jason Furman( Book )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Achieving progressive tax reform in an increasingly global economy by Jason Furman( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The progressive tax system, and the nation's fiscal system more boradly, have historically played an important role in expanding opportunities for all Americans while reducing inequality. But the same dynamic forces of technological change, financial innovation, and globalization that have contributed to rising income inequality also present new challenges for progressive taxation. Financial engineering, for example, has made it easier for the financially sophisticated--typically the wealth--to take advantage of new financial instruments that shelter their gains from tax. And as capital is able to move ever more quickly and easily across borders, corporate income becomes increasingly elusive of taxation. These forces, together with deliberate policy changes, have led to an erosion of progressivity--the principle that higher incomes should face higher rates of taxation--and a dramatic reduction in the average tax rate facing very high-income households. More than half of that decline is the result of declining effective corporate tax rates, as high-income households own disproportionate amounts of capital. The tax code is not only a means of raising revenue to pay for government services. It also impactsan astonishing array of economic and social activities, from honeownership to education and child care to support for low-income workers. Taxes contribute, as part of the problem or as part of the solution, to many of the challenges our nation faces. The present tax treatment of health insurance, for example, pushes health spending upward while offering many of the uninsured little help in getting coverage. The tax treatment of retirement savings provides a windfall for high-income Americans who would likely have saved anyway, while offering scant encouragement to saving by low- and moderate-income Americans, many of whom face the prospect of an insecure retirement. America's factories and cars continue to emit vast amounts of the carbon dioxide that drives climate change, a problem that would be remedied, in part, if the tax code imposed a cost for buring corbon-emitting fossil fuels" -- p.3
A hand up a strategy to reward work, expand opportunity, and reduce poverty by Jason Bordoff( )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Poverty remains a pressing problem in the United States. Many of the 36 million Americans in poverty are working, but full-time work at the minimum wage does not provide enough income to escape poverty. This paper offers a three-part strategy to reduce poverty and strengthen growth across the income spectrum. First, the most effective antipoverty policy is to help people find a job that pays enough to support a family. This paper's principal focus is on programs to reward and facilitate work. Second, a broader set of policies is necessary to prepare people to succeed, by investing in human capital and other critical needs. Finally, public policies should provide a more robust safety net and a set of social insurance policies to help people rebound if they do experience economic hardship, and reduce the likelihood of their falling below a certain economic level at any point. Together, these policies can raise the living standards of struggling families and allow everyone to share in our nation's prosperity -- Abstract
The international transmission of monetary policy : evidence from the United States and Canada by Jason Furman( Book )
1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Missing markets why markets that can reduce risks are missing and what can be done about it by Jason Furman( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Markets are the central institution of the economy, allowing people to buy and sell goods and services in a manner that potentially makes everyone better off. Markets can also play a role in reducing the risks that individuals face by allowing them to purchase insurance such as health insurance, life insurance, or property insurance. Through insurance markets, households and communities can reduce the risks they face by pooling them, or sell these risks to entities that are better." able to bear them
Path to prosperity an economic strategy to achieve more broadly shared growth ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Today, too many Americans are not fully sharing in our nation's prosperity. Real median wages have stagnated, income inequality has increased, and changes in the economy that have brought benefits have also brought new risks and insecurities. In response to these challenges, our nation needs to act now on three fronts. First, our national must make the right long-term investments to promote economic growth that is both strong and sustainable. Second, it is necessary to put in place economic policies that will better achieve broad-based participation in that growth. Third, for growth to be sustainable, it is necessary to restore sound fiscal policy, moving on a multiyear path to a sustainable fiscal position. This papers elaborates on the economic challenges and the recommended policy responses. It considers the commonly held view that promoting economic growth, broad-based participation in growth, and economic security may be contradictory policy objectives, but finds instead that these objectives are mutually reinforcing. It argues that while free markets are the cornerstone of economic growth, there is a necessary role for robust government action to support and supplement market forces and to help share the gains of growth more broadly. abstract (p.2)
Coping with demographic uncertainty by Jason Furman( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The discussion of Social Security reform has centered around alternative plans to restore solvency based on the best available current projections. This is the same process that was followed in the past. In 1983 Congress enacted a bipartisan reform intended to ensure 75-year solvency for Social Security. But no sooner had Social Security been saved than the program slipped back into projected insolvency and the reform debate began anew. One reaction to this development, not without controversy, has been the notion that reform should not aim at ensuring "sustainable solvency." That is, Social Security reform should not just put the program on a sustainable footing for 75 years but should aim for projected balance over the indefinite -- or even infinite -- future. Consistent with this, it has become more common to focus not just on the aggregate 75-year impact of Social Security proposals but also to ensure that the cash flow balance is positive in the 75th year
 
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English (41)
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