WorldCat Identities

Garipzanov, Ildar H.

Overview
Works: 37 works in 108 publications in 3 languages and 2,396 library holdings
Genres: History  Church history  Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ildar H Garipzanov
The symbolic language of authority in the Carolingian world (c. 751-877) by Ildar H Garipzanov( )

12 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,207 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A political narrative of Carolingian history structured by numismatic, diplomatic, liturgical, and iconographic sources. It deals with political signs, images, and fixed formulas in them as interconnected elements in a symbolic language that was used in the indirect negotiation and maintenance of Carolingian authority
Franks, Northmen, and Slavs : identities and state formation in early medieval Europe( Book )

13 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Eleven specialists examine here the role of ethnic identity in the formation of medieval polities on the periphery of the Frankish world in the eighth through eleventh centuries. In particular, they explore the intertwined issues of ethnic identity and state formation in Scandinavia and in the western and southern Slavic regions, areas in which the new approaches to the history of ethnicity have but little penetrated traditional scholarship. They ask to what extent common identities assisted in the consolidation and creation of early medieval kingdoms and to what extent the formation of these kingdoms created a discourse of common identity as a means to centralization and control. The authors contend that the developments in Scandinavia and in Slavic areas cannot be understood except in dynamic relationship with the process of state formation and group identity within the Frankish kingdoms. This powerful, expansionist society not only interacted and influenced the development of state structures on its northern and eastern borders, but it also provided models of discourse about the relationship between centralizing power and group solidarity. Not that these discourses were simply adopted by the Franks' neighbours, but rather they became part of the range of possible options selectively adapted to local circumstances."--Jacket
Graphic signs of authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, 300-900 by Ildar H Garipzanov( Book )

10 editions published in 2018 in English and Undetermined and held by 210 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Graphic Signs Of Authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages' presents a cultural history of graphic signs and examines how they were employed to communicate secular and divine authority in the late antique Mediterranean and early medieval Europe. Visual materials such as the sign of the cross, christograms, monograms, and other such devices, are examined against the backdrop of the cultural, religious, and socio-political transition from the late Graeco-Roman world to that of medieval Europe. This monograph is a synthetic study of graphic visual evidence from a wide range of material media that have rarely been studied collectively, including various mass-produced items and unique objects of art, architectural monuments and epigraphic inscriptions, as well as manuscripts and charters. This study promises to provide a timely reference tool for historians, art historians, archaeologists, epigraphists, manuscript scholars, and numismatists
Historical narratives and Christian identity on a European periphery : early history writing in Northern, East-Central, and Eastern Europe (c. 1070-1200)( Book )

12 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 155 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Graphic devices and the early decorated book by Michelle Brown( Book )

6 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The early medieval decorated book illuminates our understanding of the processes of cultural transition from late Antiquity to the Middle Ages and from a trans-continental super-power to western and eastern nation states and revivals of empire - Byzantine and Carolingian. The study of 'graphicacy' (graphic devices, such as inscribed letters and decorative symbols, used to convey information on the text) is emerging as a pivotal tool for understanding how the graphic architecture of the book played a role in the dissemination and reception of thought. The essays in this volume add to the growing scholarship on the medieval schematic and diagramming imagination, exploring some of the many ways in which the spatial arrangement and patterning of text, graphic sign, and figural image generated meaning for medieval viewers, readers, and performers of the written word. Among the individual topics addressed are monograms; the appearance of the cross in early medieval Christian manuscripts; and Anglo-Saxon decorated initials
Conversion and identity in the Viking Age( Book )

7 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume presents a state-of-the-art collection of essays on the socio-cultural aspects of the conversion to Christianity in Viking-Age Scandinavia and the Scandinavian colonies of the North Atlantic. The nine scholars, drawn from the disciplines of history, archaeology, and literary studies, have been brought together to address the overarching topic of how conversion affected peoples' identities - both as individuals, and as members of broader religious, political, and social groups - on either side of the 'divide' between paganism and Christianity. Central to this exploration is the question of how existing and changing identities shaped the progress of conversion as a process of societal, and more specifically cultural, change. Each of the papers in this volume provides examples of the complicated patterns of interaction, influence, and identity-modification that were characteristic of the transition from paganism to Christianity in the Viking world. The authors look for new ways of understanding and describing this gradual intermingling between the two fuzzy-edged religious communities, and they provide a challenging redefinition of the nature of conversion in the Viking Age that will be of interest both to a wide variety of medievalists and to all those who work on conversion in its theoretical and historical aspects
Saints and their lives on the periphery : veneration of saints in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe (c.1000-1200)( Book )

9 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Graphic signs of identity, faith, and power in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages( Book )

3 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brings together historians, art historians, and archaeologists to discuss the role of graphic representational signs and symbols and to look at contexts facilitating their dissemination in a wide range of media in the late Roman and post-Roman worlds. In this volume, twelve specialists examine the role of graphic signs such as cross signs, christograms, and monograms in the late Roman and post-Roman worlds and the contexts that facilitated their dissemination in diverse media. The essays collected here explore the rise and spread of graphic signs in relation to socio-cultural transformations during Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages, focusing in particular on evolving perceptions and projections of authority. They ask whether some culturally specific norms and practices of graphic composition and communication can be discerned behind the rising corpus of graphic signs from the fourth to tenth centuries and whether common features can be found in their production and use across various media and contexts. The contributors to this book analyse the uses of graphic signs in quotidian objects, imperial architectural programmes, and a wide range of other media. In doing so, they argue that late antique and early medieval graphic signs were efficacious means to communicate with both the supernatural and earthly worlds, as well as to disseminate visual messages regarding religious identity and faith, and social power
Graphic signs of identity, faith, and power in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages( Book )

4 editions published between 2012 and 2017 in English and Italian and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brings together historians, art historians, and archaeologists to discuss the role of graphic representational signs and symbols and to look at contexts facilitating their dissemination in a wide range of media in the late Roman and post-Roman worlds. In this volume, twelve specialists examine the role of graphic signs such as cross signs, christograms, and monograms in the late Roman and post-Roman worlds and the contexts that facilitated their dissemination in diverse media. The essays collected here explore the rise and spread of graphic signs in relation to socio-cultural transformations during Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages, focusing in particular on evolving perceptions and projections of authority. They ask whether some culturally specific norms and practices of graphic composition and communication can be discerned behind the rising corpus of graphic signs from the fourth to tenth centuries and whether common features can be found in their production and use across various media and contexts. The contributors to this book analyse the uses of graphic signs in quotidian objects, imperial architectural programmes, and a wide range of other media. In doing so, they argue that late antique and early medieval graphic signs were efficacious means to communicate with both the supernatural and earthly worlds, as well as to disseminate visual messages regarding religious identity and faith, and social power
Historical Narratives and Christian Identity on a European Periphery : Early History Writing in Northern, East-Central, and Eastern Europe (c. 1070-1200)( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume presents the first comprehensive overview of the major early historical narratives created in Northern, East-Central, and Eastern Europe between c. 1070 and c. 1200, with each chapter providing a short introduction to the narrative in question. Most chapters are written by established experts in their fields, who have published critical editions of the discussed narratives, their English translations, or analytical works dealing with early history writing in corresponding regions. However, the volume is more than just a summary of various narratives. Despite being written in such different languages as Latin, Old Norse, and Old Church Slavonic, these narratives played similar roles for their reading audiences, in that they were crucial in the construction of Christian identity in the lands recently converted to Christianity. The thirteen authors contemplate the extent to which this identity formation affected the nature of narrativity in these early historical works. The authors ask how the pagan past and Christian present were incorporated in the texture of the narratives, and address the relative importance of classical and biblical models for their composition and structure. By addressing such questions, the volume offers medievalists a coherent comparative study of early history writing in the peripheral regions of medieval Europe in the first centuries after conversion
Franks, Northmen, and Slavs : Identities and State Formation in Early Medieval Europe( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In recent decades, historians attempting to understand the transition from the world of late antiquity with its unitary imperial system to the medieval Europe of separate kingdoms have become increasingly concerned with the role of early medieval gentes, or peoples, in the end of the former and the constitution of the latter. Eleven specialists examine here the role of ethnic identity in the formation of medieval polities on the periphery of the Frankish world in the eighth through eleventh centuries. In particular, they explore the intertwined issues of ethnic identity and state formation in Scandinavia and in the western and southern Slavic regions, areas in which the new approaches to the history of ethnicity have but little penetrated traditional scholarship. They ask to what extent common identities assisted in the consolidation and creation of early medieval kingdoms and to what extent the formation of these kingdoms created a discourse of common identity as a means to centralization and control. The authors contend that the developments in Scandinavia and in Slavic areas cannot be understood except in dynamic relationship with the process of state formation and group identity within the Frankish kingdoms. This powerful, expansionist society not only interacted and influenced the development of state structures on its northern and eastern borders, but it also provided models of discourse about the relationship between centralizing power and group solidarity. Not that these discourses were simply adopted by the Franks' neighbours, but rather they became part of the range of possible options selectively adapted to local circumstances
Saints and their lives on the periphery : veneration of saints in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe (c. 1000-1200)( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume examines the cult of the saints and their associated literature in two peripheral regions of Christendom that were converted to Christianity around the turn of the first millennium, namely, Scandinavia and Eastern Europe. The thirteen authors focus on how cultures of sanctity were transmitted across the two regions and on the role that neighbouring Christian countries like England, Germany, and Byzantium played in that process. The authors also ask to what extent the division between Latin Christianity and Eastern Orthodoxy affected the early development of the cult of saints on the two peripheries. The first part of the book offers for the first time a comprehensive overview of the veneration of local and universal saints in Scandinavia and northern Rus' from c. 1000 to c. 1200, with a particular emphasis on saints who were venerated in both regions. The second part presents examples of how some early hagiographic works produced on the northern and eastern peripheries borrowed, adapted, and transformed - i.e. contextualized - literary traditions from the Latin West and Byzantium
Early Christianity on the way from the Varangians to the Greeks by Ildar H Garipzanov( Book )

4 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conversion and identity in the Viking age( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conversion and identity in the Viking Age( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The symbolic language of authority in the Carolingian world (c. 751-877) [electronic resource] by Ildar H Garipzanov( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A political narrative of Carolingian history structured by numismatic, diplomatic, liturgical, and iconographic sources. It deals with political signs, images, and fixed formulas in them as interconnected elements in a symbolic language that was used in the indirect negotiation and maintenance of Carolingian authority
Religious symbols on early Christian Scandinavian coins (ca. 995-1050) : from imitation to adaption by Ildar H Garipzanov( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rex Francorum - Imperator Augustus - Gratia dei Rex : the "language" of authority in the Carolingian world (751-877) by Ildar H Garipzanov( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Karolingskoe monetnoe delo i rimskaja imperskaja tradicija by Ildar H Garipzanov( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in Russian and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regensburg, Wandalgarius and the novi denarii : Charlemagne's monetary reform revisited by Ildar H Garipzanov( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Franks, Northmen, and Slavs : identities and state formation in early medieval Europe
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Franks, Northmen, and Slavs : identities and state formation in early medieval EuropeSaints and their lives on the periphery : veneration of saints in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe (c.1000-1200)
Alternative Names
Garipzanov, I. Ch.

Garipzanov, I. Ch. 1966-

Garipzanov, I. H.

Garipzanov Ildar

Garipzanov, Ildar 1966-

Garipzanov, Ildar Ch

Garipzanov, Ildar Ch. 1966-

Garipzanov, Ilʹdar Chajdarovič

Garipzanov, Ilʹdar Chajdarovič 1966-

Garipzanov, Ildar H.

Garipzanov, Ildar H. 1966-

Garipzanov, Ildar Hajdarovič 1966-

Гарипзанов, Ильдар Хайдарович

Гарипзанов Ильдар Хайдарович 1966-....

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