WorldCat Identities

Jackson, Brian A. 1972-

Overview
Works: 98 works in 323 publications in 1 language and 28,412 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Case studies 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HV6431, 303.625
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Brian A Jackson
Aptitude for destruction by Brian A Jackson( )

18 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3,554 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Better ways are needed to understand how terrorist groups become more effective and dangerous. Learning is the link between what a group wants to do and its ability to actually do it; therefore, a better understanding of group learning might contribute to the design of better measures for combating terrorism. This study analyzes current understanding of group learning and the factors that influence it and outlines a framework that should be useful in present analytical efforts and for identifying areas requiring further study
Breaching the fortress wall : understanding terrorist efforts to overcome defensive technologies by Brian A Jackson( )

17 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 2,411 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Technology systems play a key role within a larger, integrated strategy to target groups' efforts and protect the public from the threat of terrorist violence. This study draws on relevant data from the history of a variety of terrorist conflicts to understand terrorists' counter-technology efforts. Fully exploring adversaries' counter-technology behaviors can help make the best choices to protect from the nation from the threat of terrorism
Challenges and choices for crime-fighting technology : federal support of state and local law enforcement by William Schwabe( )

11 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 2,183 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Under the American federal system, most law is cast as state statutes and local ordinances; accordingly, most law enforcement is the responsibility of state and local agencies. Federal law and federal law enforcement come into play only where there is rationale for it, consistent with the Constitution. Within this framework, a clear role has been identified for federal support of state and local agencies. This report provides findings of a study of technology in use or needed by law enforcement agencies at the state and local level, for the purpose of informing federal policymakers as they consider technology-related support for these agencies. In addition, it seeks to characterize the obstacles that exist to technology adoption by law enforcement agencies and to characterize the perceived effects of federal assistance programs intended to facilitate the process. The study findings are based on a nationwide Law Enforcement Technology Survey and a similar Forensics Technology Survey (FTS) conducted in late spring and early summer2000, interviews conducted throughout the year, focus groups conducted in autumn 2000, and review of an extensive, largely nonacademic literature. Companion reports: Schwabe, William, Needs and Prospects for Crime-Fighting Technology: The Federal Role in Assisting State and Local Law Enforcement, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND, 1999. Davis, Lois M., William Schwabe, and Ronald Fricker, Challenges and Choices for Crime-Fighting Technology: Results from Two Nationwide Surveys, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND, 2001
Protecting emergency responders : lessons learned from terrorist attacks by Brian A Jackson( )

15 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 2,151 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents a summary of a December 2001 working conference, sponsored by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Attending were emergency workers who responded to the bombing of the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City, the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the anthrax incidents that occurred during autumn 2001. The report addresses the equipment, training and information required to protect emergency responders as they meet the challenge of protecting their communities
Evaluating novel threats to the homeland : unmanned aerial vehicles and cruise missiles by Brian A Jackson( )

15 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 1,992 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Develops approaches for assessing asymmetric attacks using cruise missiles or unmanned aerial vehicles, a novel potential threat to homeland targets, in the context of other options available to terrorist actors and for identifying the factors that might make these technologies attractive to adversaries. These approaches provide the basis for exploring defensive options
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations by Brian A Jackson( )

9 editions published between 2010 and 2014 in English and held by 1,964 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ability to measure emergency preparedness - to predict the likely performance of emergency response systems in future events - is critical for policy analysis in homeland security. Yet it remains difficult to know how prepared a response system is to deal with large-scale incidents, whether it be a natural disaster, terrorist attack, or industrial or transportation accident. This research draws on the fields of systems analysis and engineering to apply the concept of system reliability to the evaluation of emergency response systems. The authors describe a method for modeling an emergency response system; identifying how individual parts of the system might fail; and assessing the likelihood of each failure and the severity of its effects on the overall response effort. The authors walk the reader through two applications of this method: a simplified example in which responders must deliver medical treatment to a certain number of people in a specified time window, and a more complex scenario involving the release of chlorine gas. The authors also describe an exploratory analysis in which they parsed a set of after-action reports describing real-world incidents, to demonstrate how this method can be used to quantitatively analyze data on past response performance. The authors conclude with a discussion of how this method of measuring emergency response system reliability could inform policy discussion of emergency preparedness, how system reliability might be improved, and the costs of doing so. --From publisher description
Considering the creation of a domestic intelligence agency in the United States : lessons from the experiences of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom by Brian A Jackson( )

13 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,862 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With terrorism still prominent on the U.S. agenda, whether the country's prevention efforts match the threat the United States faces continues to be central in policy debate. One element of this debate is questioning whether the United States should create a dedicated domestic intelligence agency. Case studies of five other democracies--Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the UK --provide lessons and common themes that may help policymakers decide. The authors find that: most of the five countries separate the agency that conducts domestic intelligence gathering from any arrest and detention powers; each country has instituted some measure of external oversight over its domestic intelligence agency; liaison with other international, foreign, state, and local agencies helps ensure the best sharing of information; the boundary between domestic and international intelligence activities may be blurring.--Publisher description
Emerging threats and security planning : how should we decide what hypothetical threats to worry about? by Brian A Jackson( )

9 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,814 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Concerns about how terrorists might attack in the future are central to the design of security efforts to protect both individual targets and the nation overall. In thinking about emerging threats, security planners are confronted by a panoply of possible future scenarios coming from sources ranging from the terrorists themselves to red-team brainstorming efforts to explore ways adversaries might attack in the future. This paper explores an approach to assessing emerging and/or novel threats and deciding whether, or how much, they should concern security planners by asking two questions: (1) Are some of the novel threats 'niche threats' that should be addressed within existing security efforts? (2) Which of the remaining threats are attackers most likely to execute successfully and should therefore be of greater concern for security planners? If threats can reasonably be considered niche threats, they can be prudently addressed in the context of existing security activities. If threats are unusual enough, suggest significant new vulnerabilities, or their probability or consequences means they cannot be considered lesser included cases within other threats, prioritizing them based on their ease of execution provides a guide for which threats merit the greatest concern and most security attention. This preserves the opportunity to learn from new threats yet prevents security planners from being pulled in many directions simultaneously by attempting to respond to every threat at once."--Page 4 of cover
The challenge of domestic intelligence in a free society : a multidisciplinary look at the creation of a U.S. domestic counterterrorism intelligence agency by Brian A Jackson( )

13 editions published between 1900 and 2009 in English and held by 1,716 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Whether U.S. terrorism-prevention efforts match the threat continues to be central in policy debate. Part of this debate is whether the United States needs a dedicated domestic counterterrorism intelligence agency. This book examines such an agency's possible capability, comparing its potential effectiveness with that of current efforts, and its acceptability to the public, as well as various balances and trade-offs involved
Fostering innovation in community and institutional corrections : identifying high-priority technology and other needs for the U.S. corrections sector by Brian A Jackson( )

7 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 1,333 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The agencies of the U.S. corrections enterprise manage offenders confined in prisons and jails and those who have been released into the community on probation and parole. The enterprise is one of the three central pillars of the criminal justice system, along with police and the courts. Corrections agencies face major challenges from declining budgets, increasing populations under supervision, problems of equity and fairness in administrating justice, and other concerns. To better achieve its objectives and play its role within the criminal justice enterprise, the sector needs innovation in corrections technology, policy, and practice. This report draws on published literature and new structured deliberations of a practitioner Corrections Advisory Panel to frame an innovation agenda. It identifies and prioritizes potential improvements in technology, policy, and practice in both community and institutional corrections. Some of the top-tier needs identified by the panel and researchers include adapting transcription and translation tools for the corrections environment, developing training for officers on best practices for managing offenders with mental health needs, and changing visitation policies (for example, using video visitation) to reduce opportunities for visitors to bring contraband into jails and prisons. Such high-priority needs provide a menu of innovation options for addressing key problems or capitalizing on emerging opportunities in the corrections sector. This report is part of a larger effort to assess and prioritize technology and related needs across the criminal justice community for the National Institute of Justice{u2019}s National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center system
How do we know what information sharing is really worth? : exploring methodologies to measure the value of information sharing and fusion efforts by Brian A Jackson( )

9 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 995 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the sharing of intelligence and law enforcement information has been a central part of U.S. domestic security efforts. Though much of the public debate about such sharing focuses on addressing the threat of terrorism, organizations at all levels of government routinely share varied types of information through multiagency information systems, collaborative groups, and other links. Given resource constraints, there are concerns about the effectiveness of information-sharing and fusion activities and, therefore, their value relative to the public funds invested in them. Solid methods for evaluating these efforts are lacking, however, limiting the ability to make informed policy decisions. Drawing on a substantial literature review and synthesis, this report lays out the challenges of evaluating information-sharing efforts that frequently seek to achieve multiple goals simultaneously; reviews past evaluations of information-sharing programs; and lays out a path to improving the evaluation of such efforts going forward."--"Abstract" on web page
Efficient aviation security : strengthening the analytic foundation for making air transportation security decisions by Brian A Jackson( )

9 editions published between 2006 and 2012 in English and held by 669 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Making aviation security more cost-effective is hampered by a lack of understanding of the costs and benefits of security interventions. Moreover, there will always be considerable uncertainty about terrorists{u2019} capabilities and decisionmaking, security system performance, and the tangible and intangible costs of security measures. This volume focuses on exploring ways to use cost-benefit and other types of analysis to improve aviation security decisionmaking in spite of such uncertainties. The authors present a set of analyses that discuss how historical data on aviation security can inform security planning; examine ways to address uncertainty about the costs of security measures; discuss the ways in which different layers of a security system interact; offer a method for incorporating deterrence into the assessment of security measures via the concept of a risk-reduction threshold, using the Federal Air Marshal Service as an example; examine tradeoffs between intended and unintended consequences of security measures, using a trusted traveler program as an example; and discuss the merits of high- versus low-resolution models of aviation terrorism for informing policy. These analyses contribute to filling some of the current gaps in the assessment of the costs, benefits, and efficiency of aviation security measures and strategies
Visions of law enforcement technology in the period 2024-2034 : report of the Law Enforcement Futuring Workshop by R. S Silberglitt( )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 630 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This report describes the results of the Law Enforcement Futuring Workshop, which was held at RAND's Washington Office in Arlington, Virginia, from July 22 to 25, 2014. The objective of this workshop was to identify high-priority technology needs for law enforcement based on consideration of current and future trends in society, technology, and law enforcement over a ten- to 20-year time period. During the workshop, participants developed sets of future scenarios, constructed pathways from the present to alternative futures, and considered how law enforcement use of technology might affect these pathways. They then identified technology needs (including training and changes in policies or practice) that, if addressed, could enable pathways to desirable futures or prevent or mitigate the effects of pathways to undesirable futures. On the final days of the workshop, the technology needs were prioritized using a Delphi method. The output of this workshop described in the report included ten future scenarios and 30 technology needs. The technology needs fell into three general categories--technology-related knowledge and practice, information sharing and use, and technology research and development--and were placed into three priority tiers"--Back cover
Fostering innovation in the U.S. court system : identifying high-priority technology and other needs for improving court operations and outcomes by Brian A Jackson( )

11 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 630 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Society relies on the judicial system to play numerous roles. It is the link between law enforcement and the corrections system and serves as a check on their power over citizens. It also adjudicates civil disputes, serving as a venue for negotiation and resolution of various problems. In playing these roles, courts today are challenged by a wide range of issues, such as high caseloads, resource constraints, disparities in justice outcomes, and increasing needs to share information. For the courts to adapt to these challenges and take advantage of new opportunities to improve their ability to play their critical roles, the court system needs innovation. This report draws on published literature and new structured deliberations of a practitioner Courts Advisory Panel to frame an innovation agenda. It identifies and prioritizes potential improvements in technology, policy, and practice for the court system. Some of the top-tier needs identified by the panel and researchers include developing better tools to sort cases and match them with the process most likely to get them to an outcome efficiently and effectively, defining strategies and minimum standards for protecting the "virtual filing cabinets" that hold the court's formal records, and expanding the court-related transactions and interactions that could be done from a distance over the Internet. Such high-priority needs provide a menu of innovation options for addressing key problems or capitalizing on emerging opportunities for the court system. This report is part of a larger effort to assess and prioritize technology and related needs across the criminal justice community for the National Institute of Justice's National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center system"--Publisher's description
High-priority information technology needs for law enforcement by John S Hollywood( )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 614 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study reports on strategic planning activities supporting the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) in the area of information technology, collecting and analyzing data on law enforcement needs and offering potential solutions through technology assessment studies, extensive outreach and liaison activities, and subject matter expert panels. Strategic planning will help NIJ make the best investments to leverage its limited funds and help the range of technology developers supporting law enforcement better understand the law enforcement community{u2019}s needs and priorities. By looking across the top-ranking needs, the authors identified 11 crosscutting themes in total. These themes are further grouped into three overarching keynotes-a broad need to improve the law enforcement community{u2019}s knowledge of technology and practices, a broad need to improve the sharing and use of law enforcement-relevant information, and a broad need to conduct research, development, testing, and evaluation on a range of topics. The latter category includes research on both the "nonmaterial" side of technology, including policy and practices, and more traditional technical development
Using future Internet technologies to strengthen criminal justice by John S Hollywood( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 579 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Future World Wide Web technologies commonly labeled as being part of Web 3.0 and Web 4.0 could substantially change how the criminal justice enterprise operates. These notably include Semantic Web technologies, intelligent agents, and the Internet of Things. In September 2014, RAND conducted an expert panel for the National Institute of Justice to discuss how the criminal justice community can take advantage of (and reduce the risks from) these emerging technologies. The top unifying theme from the panel was to leverage web technologies to improve information-sharing and protection across the criminal justice enterprise, and to address challenges that the new technologies raise. Another major theme was improving practitioners' knowledge of web technologies. Priorities included general education on key web technologies, and model policies and procedures for using them. A third theme was to improve the networking infrastructure needed to support web technologies (and other applications), especially for courts and corrections. Fourth, several needs became apparent related to leveraging wearable and embedded sensors (part of the Internet of Things), with an emphasis on using sensors to improve officer health and safety. Finally, panelists frequently noted the importance of civil rights, privacy rights, and cybersecurity protections in using the emerging technologies for criminal justice. While there were few needs about these topics specifically, panelists noted that more than half of the needs raised security, privacy, or civil rights concerns, or had implied requirements on these topics"--Publisher's description
The role of technology in improving K-12 school safety by Heather L Schwartz( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 574 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Violence in schools negatively affects children's future life outcomes and the culture and performance of the school. For these reasons, promoting school safety is a national priority for many federal agencies, including the National Institute of Justice. This report focuses on school safety technologies as one among many approaches to prevent and respond to school violence. In the report, the authors summarize existing research on school violence, categorize school safety technologies and describe the available research about them, present six case studies of innovative technologies as used in schools, summarize experts' views of technologies and safety problems based on interviews, and present experts' rankings of technology needs to improve school safety produced during two day-long panels. These activities revealed that some of the most pressing safety needs that technology could address relate to (1) enabling two-way communication between teachers and emergency responders; (2) "all-in-one" applications that would integrate currently fragmented and outdated school safety policies, procedures, and training for school staff and parents; (3) advances in social media monitoring; and (4) improved tip lines to make them more robust and effective. Results should be of interest to organizations and individuals involved with K12 school technology planning, research funding, and product development"--Back cover
Digital evidence and the U.S. criminal justice system : identifying technology and other needs to more effectively acquire and utilize digital evidence by Sean E Goodison( )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 572 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes the results of a National Institute of Justice (NIJ)-sponsored research effort to identify and prioritize criminal justice needs related to digital evidence collection, management, analysis, and use. With digital devices becoming ubiquitous, digital evidence is increasingly important to the investigation and prosecution of many types of crimes. These devices often contain information about crimes committed, movement of suspects, and criminal associates. However, there are significant challenges to successfully using digital evidence in prosecutions, including inexperience of patrol officers and detectives in preserving and collecting digital evidence, lack of familiarity with digital evidence on the part of court officials, and an overwhelming volume of work for digital evidence examiners. Through structured interaction with police digital forensic experts, prosecuting attorneys, a privacy advocate, and industry representatives, the effort identified and prioritized specific needs to improve utilization of digital evidence in criminal justice. Several top-tier needs emerged from the analysis, including education of prosecutors and judges regarding digital evidence opportunities and challenges; training for patrol officers and investigators to promote better collection and preservation of digital evidence; tools for detectives to triage analysis of digital evidence in the field; development of regional models to make digital evidence analysis capability available to small departments; and training to address concerns about maintaining the currency of training and technology available to digital forensic examiners
Police department investments in information technology systems : challenges assessing their payoff by Brian A Jackson( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 534 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The potential effects of information technology (IT) systems on police productivity will be driven, in part, by the match between the technology and police activities. In modern policing, how information is used for reactive response to incidents is significantly different from proactive and community-policing activities, so we expect the effects of IT to be quite different. The authors developed a logic model of police functions to guide examination of the different expected effects of IT on productivity. The logic model helped guide a statistical analysis in an effort to identify productivity and budgetary effects of different IT investments in police departments. However, even the best available data were insufficient to break down police agencies' use of the technology at a sufficient level of granularity to provide meaningful results. Future efforts to assess the effects of IT systems on law enforcement performance can benefit from the results of the logic modeling and exploratory analysis. Specifically, it is important to collect data not just on department acquisition of IT systems, but also on how the systems are used and the activities that the use is intended to support. In considering potential productivity improvement from IT use, analysts need ways to measure relative levels of effort devoted to different police functions because the role of IT as a force multiplier means that its benefits will be driven, in part, by the force available to multiply
Aptitude for Destruction, Volume 2 : Case Studies of Organizational Learning in Five Terrorist Groups by Brian A Jackson( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 405 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Case studies of the organizational learning activities of five major terrorist groups and a methodology for ascertaining what and why they learned
 
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Breaching the fortress wall : understanding terrorist efforts to overcome defensive technologies
Covers
Breaching the fortress wall : understanding terrorist efforts to overcome defensive technologiesChallenges and choices for crime-fighting technology : federal support of state and local law enforcementProtecting emergency responders : lessons learned from terrorist attacksEvaluating novel threats to the homeland : unmanned aerial vehicles and cruise missilesEvaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operationsConsidering the creation of a domestic intelligence agency in the United States : lessons from the experiences of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the United KingdomEmerging threats and security planning : how should we decide what hypothetical threats to worry about?The challenge of domestic intelligence in a free society : a multidisciplinary look at the creation of a U.S. domestic counterterrorism intelligence agencyAptitude for Destruction, Volume 2 : Case Studies of Organizational Learning in Five Terrorist Groups
Alternative Names
Jackson, Brian

Languages
English (185)