WorldCat Identities

Jackson, Maurice 1950-

Overview
Works: 17 works in 45 publications in 2 languages and 1,813 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Sources  Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Portraits  Interviews  Exhibition catalogs  Short films 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Maurice Jackson
 
Most widely held works by Maurice Jackson
Let this voice be heard : Anthony Benezet, father of Atlantic abolitionism by Maurice Jackson( )

10 editions published between 2008 and 2010 in English and held by 988 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this wide-ranging intellectual biography, Maurice Jackson demonstrates how Benezet mediated Enlightenment political and social thought, narratives of African life written by slave traders themselves, and the ideas and experiences of ordinary people to create a new antislavery critique. Benezet's use of travel narratives challenged proslavery arguments about an undifferentiated, "primitive" African society. Benezet's empirical evidence, laid on the intellectual scaffolding provided by the writings of Hutcheson, Wallace, and Montesquieu, had a profound influence, from the high-culture writings of the Marquis de Condorcet to the opinions of ordinary citizens. When the great antislavery spokesmen Jacques-Pierre Brissot in France and William Wilberforce in England rose to demand abolition of the slave trade, they read into the record of the French National Assembly and the British Parliament extensive unatrributed quotations from Benezet's writings, a fitting tribute to the influence of his work."--Jacket
African Americans and the Haitian revolution : selected essays and historical documents by Maurice Jackson( Book )

7 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 311 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Bringing together scholarly essays and helpfully annotated primary documents, African Americans and the Haitian Revolution collects not only the best recent scholarship on the subject, but also showcases the primary texts written by African Americans about the Haitian Revolution. Rather than being about the revolution itself, this collection attempts to show how the events in Haiti served to galvanize African Americans to think about themselves and to act in accordance with their beliefs, and contributes to the study of African Americans in the wider Atlantic World."--Jacket
DC jazz : stories of jazz music in Washington, DC by Maurice Jackson( )

5 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 237 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The conventional history of jazz music in the United States begins in New Orleans, moves upstream along the Mississippi River to Chicago, then by rail into New York before exploding across the globe. But in fact the nation's capital has been a fertile city for jazz for a century. Some of the most important clubs in the jazz world have opened and closed their doors in Washington, DC; some of its greatest players and promoters were born there and continue to reside in the area; and some of the local institutions so critical to supporting this uniquely American form of music--including Congress and the Smithsonian Institution and the Library of Congress and the Historical Society of Washington, DC--remain vigorous advocates. Edited by noted historians Maurice Jackson and Blair Ruble, this book is a collection of original and fascinating stories about the DC jazz scene, from the cultural hotbed of Seventh and U Streets to the role of jazz in desegregating the city to the great Edward "Duke" Ellington to women in jazz to seminal contributions of the University of District of Columbia and Howard University. The book also includes three poems by Washington, DC poet E. Ethelbert Miller. A copublishing initiative with the Historical Society of Washington, DC, the book includes over thirty museum-quality photographs and a guide to resources for learning more about Washington, DC jazz
Quakers and their allies in the abolitionist cause, 1754-1808 by Maurice Jackson( Book )

7 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 148 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume explores the significant connections between the Quaker community and the cause to abolish slavery in America. The case studies that make up the collection mainly focus on the greater Philadelphia area (including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware), a hotbed of the abolitionist movement and the location of the first American abolition society founded in 1775. Despite the importance of Quakers to the abolitionist movement, their significance has been largely overlooked in the existing historiography. These studies will be of interest to scholars of slavery and abolition, religious history, Atlantic studies and American social and political history. -- Adapted from the publisher's web site
Crown Me! : Capital Pool Checkers Club by Peggy Fleming( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

CROWN ME! is a book of 24 black and white portraits and two pages of conversations with each man who belongs to the Capital Pool Checkers Club. The club is located at 9th and S Streets Northwest in Washington DC. The African American men have come to their club to play checkers at this address since 1985. Before then they met in various barber shops. The club serves as the location for serious competitive checkers as well as for joshing camaraderie. The men range in age from late 30's to 80's. Some men were born in DC and Baltimore, and others came to DC from the South and East to pursue education and jobs
The Internationale by Peter Miller( Visual )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This documentary film recreates the history, memory, and meanings of a song that has shaped the imagination and practice of internationalism for over a century and whose continuing popularity is a sign of "globalization from below." Eugène Pottier wrote the original French verses in the aftermath of the Paris Commune in 1871, and seventeen years later Pierre Degeyter put the words to music. A remarkable collection of sound recordings, film footage, and still images trace how the song has changed, developed, and sometimes stagnated in specific historical and political contexts. The contested meanings of the song are discussed, along with its use in a globalizing world shaped by migration, diaspora, and multi-national activism, to negotiate rather than suppress differences--of gender, ethnicity, and sexuality--that compose our common humanity
Quakers and Their Allies in the Abolitionist Cause by Maurice Jackson( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Ethiopia shall soon stretch her hands unto God" : Anthony Benezet and the Atlantic antislavery revolution by Maurice Jackson( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The mess in Reagan's backyard : the people protest by Maurice Jackson( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The social and intellectual origins of Anthony Benezet's antislavery radicalism by Maurice Jackson( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Botta sulla schiavitù in America by Maurice Jackson( )

1 edition published in 2010 in Italian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Diaspora voices of the African past : James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, Quobna Ottobah Cugoano, Olaudah Equiano, and Ignatius Sancho as sources of African history by Maurice Jackson( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Civil War and Georgetown University( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chandra Manning talks about runaway slaves and their role in the U.S. Civil War. Maurice Jackson talks about African Americans in Washington D.C. during the Civil War and the fight for freedom and civil rights. Lynn Conway talks about Georgetown University during the Civil War. The speakers also take part in a brief question and answer session with the audience
Washington, DC : from the founding of a slaveholding capital to a center of abolitionism by Maurice Jackson( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A reading by Edward P Jones( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Author Edward P. Jones reads excepts from "The devil swims across the Anacostia River" and "Blindsided"--Two short stories from his short story collection "All about Aunt Hagar's children." Jones also talks about his writing and answers questions from the audience
The story of Dunbar High School : how students from the first public high school for black students in the United States influenced America by Kenneth Alphonso` Mitchell( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dunbar High School is the first public high school for black children in the United States and the first public high school in Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1870, as the Preparatory High School for colored youth; and was also the first public high school in Washington, D.C. The school changed names many times before it was finally named Dunbar, after poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. The story of this school is important because many of the students and teachers of the school went on to become some of the most notable blacks in America. From 1870 until 1955, when the United States Supreme Court declared segregation in District of Columbia public schools unconstitutional in the landmark case, Bolling v. Sharpe, which was also supplemented with Brown v. Board of Education; the school had a reputation for being the best black high school in the country and its teachers were some of the best scholars this country had to offer. Dunbar was able to attract teachers with outstanding credentials because most colleges, at the time, did not hire black professors; neither did employers in most professions that required college degrees. Brilliant scholars like Richard Greener, the first black graduate of Harvard College; Anna Julia Cooper, an outstanding educator and the first black graduated of the University of Paris-Sorbonne in Paris, France; and Carter G. Woodson, the historian known as "the father of black history;" all flocked to Washington, D.C. Many notable African-Americans who made a positive impact on society, like Dr. Charles Richard Drew, the physician who perfected the use of blood plasma; Charles Hamilton Houston, a Civil Rights attorney and "the man who killed Jim Crow;" and Georgiana Simpson, the first black woman to receive a Ph. D.; attended this hidden gem in Washington, D.C. These individuals broke many racial barriers that impeded progress for blacks
 
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Let this voice be heard : Anthony Benezet, father of Atlantic abolitionism
Covers
African Americans and the Haitian revolution : selected essays and historical documents
Alternative Names
Maurice Jackson American historian

Maurice Jackson Amerikaans historicus

Maurice Jackson historiador estadounidense

Languages