WorldCat Identities

St John, Winsome

Overview
Works: 58 works in 61 publications in 1 language and 180 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Winsome St John
Community nursing practice : theory, skills and issues( Book )

3 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Offers a thorough introduction to the role of the community nurse. Based on principles of primary health care, it outlines the theory, knowledge and skills required to make a difference to the wellbeing of individuals, families, groups, and even whole communities. Contributions from leading nurse educators in Australia
Urinary continence services for community-dwelling people in the South East Coast region of Queensland by Winsome St. John( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A healthier place : a health needs assessment of families with children aged 0-4 years in the Gold Coast region of Queensland by Kim Fraser( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

... What now? : helping clients live positively with urinary incontinence( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From ambiguity to action : an insider's perspective on the role of the community health nurse in Australia by Winsome St. John( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fathers' involvement with their new baby in the early weeks after birth: Issues and implications for community practice by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2004 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

No
Daily-living management of urinary incontinence: A synthesis of the literature by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2010 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Yes
Evidence based practice in nursing by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2000 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Yes
An investigation of the views of practicing community health nurses regarding the educational preparation of nurses for practice in primary health care by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Health service provision for community-dwelling people suffering urinary incontinence: A case study of neglect by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2001 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Yes
Meeting the challenge of new fatherhood during the early weeks by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2005 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Objective: To explore new/subsequent Australian fathers' perspectives on the experiences, processes, and life changes in the early weeks of fatherhood. Design: Interpretive study using in-depth interviews and grounded theory analysis techniques, based on a symbolic interactionist framework. Setting: Participants were recruited from the postnatal wards of a major public hospital, early discharge program, and early childhood centers in southeast Queensland, Australia. Participants: Eighteen first-time/subsequent fathers interviewed 6 to 12 weeks after the birth. Results: Although rewarding, fathers found new or expanding fatherhood to be a significant challenge and time of change. Major themes included making a commitment, taking responsibility, negotiating responsibilities, developing and maintaining relationships, maintaining family integrity, balancing activities, and perceiving the self as father. Work had a major impact on fathers' ability to participate with their family and newborn. To manage, fathers sought to balance the demands of work and home, deal with stressors, manage their time, develop routines, and reprioritize. Fathers developed a sense of themselves as fathers over time, building confidence and deriving satisfaction from their fathering role. Conclusions: A range of competing factors affected fathers' ability to participate in the home with their newborn in the early weeks after birth
Teaching Family Nursing: Strategies and Experiences by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 1996 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The traditional hospital-based approach to Australian nurse education curricula was primarily based on the medical model and directed towards the preparation of nurses who were able to give care to individual clients The major focus was on the needs of the individual A notable absence in curricula was any consideration of the role or importance of families to individual and family health This was despite the continuing involvement that nurses have in their practice with the families of their clients This paper describes the experiences of introducing a family nursing subject in an undergraduate, preregistration nursing programme which focuses on the family as a unit of care Educational strategies, clinical experiences, and evaluation of the unit of study are discussed
Doing the month in a Taiwanese postpartum nursing center: An ethnographic study( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Traditionally Chinese and Taiwanese postpartum women conducted postpartum ritual practices, called "doing the month, " at home. Today, many Taiwanese women undertake this ritual in postpartum nursing centers. However, little is known about how the traditional practices are being transformed in relation to contemporary health care in Taiwan. In this ethnographic study observations were carried out in a large post‐partum center attached to a major hospital in Taipei for nine months, and 27 postpartum women were interviewed. Data were analyzed using ethnographic approaches to extract codes and categories. Doing the month was reshaped by being relocated from the home to a healthcare setting. Midwives took on roles traditionally taken by family members, which had an impact on family roles and relationships. Some postpartum practices were maintained, based on traditional explanations. However, many were modified or challenged, based on explanations from contemporary scientific knowledge. Midwives need to be aware that there could be differences between their culture of care and the cultural values of the women they care for. This study informs culturally appropriate postpartum care and support for women with traditional and contemporary cultural beliefs and attitudes to doing the month in a range of healthcare contexts
Urinary Incontinence in Community-Dwelling Populations : Issues and Challenges for Continence Care by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2008 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Keynote Address This paper reviews current issues in service provision for community-dwelling people with urinary incontinence. As the population ages, the prevalence of incontinence and demand for continence services will increase. Our challenge is to use knowledge and technology to provide care that is appropriate, effective, affordable, accessible and acceptable services for people living with urinary incontinence in the community. Treatment and therapy is needed, as well as care that will address quality of life issues and assist people with persistent incontinence to manage it in their daily lives. No one professional group has all the answers for a person seeking help for their incontinence. While specialist continence care has been found to be effective, care may be siloed within particular specialties. If everyone with urinary incontinence presented for health care, it is arguable that continence services would not cope. Further, studies over many years show that generalist health practitioners may lack knowledge, fail to address community-dwelling clients' continence needs, and fail to refer clients to continence specialists. Providing appropriate care will have costs, however, failing to provide effective care will also incur costs - both financial and in terms of human suffering. Future directions for care provision require new models of care, evidence-based practice, cost modelling and targeted funding, strengthened multi-disciplinary relationships, education of generalist clinicians, role development of continence specialists, better use of case-finding opportunities, links across sectors, clearer clinical pathways and greater visibility in the professional and general community for continence care. Future development in continence care can aspire to fulfil the principles of primary health care
Outcome evaluation of a multi-disciplinary community-based continence service for Australian women by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2004 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This longitudinal study evaluated the effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary community-based service offering conservative treatment for Australian women suffering urinary incontinence and living independently in the community, in terms of urinary incontinence symptom severity, impact on quality of life and knowledge outcomes. One hundred and twenty-three women attending The Waterworx Centre, a multi-disciplinary, publicly funded community-based continence service in South East Queensland Australia participated in the study. They received multi-disciplinary conservative treatment for urinary incontinence, including comprehensive assessment and an individually-tailored plan of care. All the women were also linked back to their own generalist health professional for ongoing care and management. Data were collected over a one-year period: at first consultation, and at three months and six months following the first consultation. The International Continence Society Urinary Symptom Index Short Form Female Outcome was used to measure urinary symptoms and impact on quality of life, and a researcher-developed test was used to measure changes in knowledge. Results showed that the women experienced an improvement in urinary symptoms and continence-related knowledge at three months following first consultation, and a decreased impact on quality of life, with these improvements either being sustained or increasing at six months. This study demonstrated that multi-disciplinary community-based services offering specialist conservative treatment for women suffering urinary incontinence can be effective in achieving improvements in urinary symptoms and continence-related knowledge and reducing the impact of urinary incontinence on quality of life
Evaluation of a multi-disciplinary community-based continence service (abstract) by Winsome St. John( )

1 edition published in 2002 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Yes
Health professionals' decision-making in wound management: a grounded theory( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Aim To develop a conceptual understanding of the decision-making processes used by healthcare professionals in wound care practice. Background With the global move towards using an evidence-base in standardizing wound care practices and the need to reduce hospital wound care costs, it is important to understand health professionals' decision-making in this important yet under-researched area. Design A grounded theory approach was used to explore clinical decision-making of healthcare professionals in wound care practice. Methods Interviews were conducted with 20 multi-disciplinary participants from nursing, surgery, infection control and wound care who worked at a metropolitan hospital in Australia. Data were collected during 2012-2013. Constant comparative analysis underpinned by Strauss and Corbin's framework was used to identify clinical decision-making processes. Findings The core category was 'balancing practice-based knowledge with evidence-based knowledge'. Participants' clinical practice and actions embedded the following processes: 'utilizing the best available information', 'using a consistent approach in wound assessment' and 'using a multidisciplinary approach'. The substantive theory explains how practice and evidence knowledge was balanced and the variation in use of intuitive practice-based knowledge versus evidence-based knowledge. Participants considered patients' needs and preferences, costs, outcomes, technologies, others' expertise and established practices. Participants' decision-making tended to be more heavily weighted towards intuitive practice-based processes. Conclusion These findings offer a better understanding of the processes used by health professionals' in their decision-making in wound care. Such an understanding may inform the development of evidence-based interventions that lead to better patient outcomes
 
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Community nursing practice : theory, skills and issues
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Alternative Names
John, Winsome St.

Saint John, Winsome

Languages
English (12)