WorldCat Identities

Butler, Erik 1971-

Overview
Works: 40 works in 187 publications in 2 languages and 9,172 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Trivia and miscellanea  Short stories  Academic theses 
Roles: Translator, Author, Other
Classifications: BF468, 153.753
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Erik Butler
Atmosphere, mood, Stimmung : on a hidden potential of literature by Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht( )

12 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 1,891 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"What are the various atmospheres or moods that the reading of literary works can trigger? Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht has long argued that the function of literature is not so much to describe, or to re-present, as to make present. Here, he goes one step further, exploring the substance and reality of language as a material component of the world--impalpable hints, tones, and airs that, as much as they may be elusive, are no less matters of actual fact ... Conveying personal encounters with poetry, song, painting, and the novel, this book thus gestures toward the intangible and in the process, constitutes a bold defense of the subjective experience of the arts."--Page 4 of cover
Felt time : the psychology of how we perceive time by Marc Wittmann( )

13 editions published between 2015 and 2017 in English and held by 1,433 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"We have widely varying perceptions of time. Children have trouble waiting for anything. ("Are we there yet?") Boredom is often connected to our sense of time passing (or not passing). As people grow older, time seems to speed up, the years flitting by without a pause. How does our sense of time come about? In Felt Time, Marc Wittmann explores the riddle of subjective time, explaining our perception of time--whether moment by moment, or in terms of life as a whole. Drawing on the latest insights from psychology and neuroscience, Wittmann offers a new answer to the question of how we experience time. Wittmann explains, among other things, how we choose between savoring the moment and deferring gratification; why impulsive people are bored easily, and why their boredom is often a matter of time; whether each person possesses a personal speed, a particular brain rhythm distinguishing quick people from slow people; and why the feeling of duration can serve as an "error signal," letting us know when it is taking too long for dinner to be ready or for the bus to come. He considers the practice of mindfulness, and whether it can reduce the speed of life and help us gain more time, and he describes how, as we grow older, subjective time accelerates as routine increases; a fulfilled and varied life is a long life. Evidence shows that bodily processes--especially the heartbeat--underlie our feeling of time and act as an internal clock for our sense of time. And Wittmann points to recent research that connects time to consciousness; ongoing studies of time consciousness, he tells us, will help us to understand the conscious self."--Publisher's description
The truth of the technological world : essays on the genealogy of presence by Friedrich A Kittler( )

6 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 1,212 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Friedrich Kittler (1943-2011) combined the study of literature, cinema, technology, and philosophy in a manner sufficiently novel to be recognized as a new field of academic endeavor in his native Germany. ""Media studies, "" as Kittler conceived it, meant reflecting on how books operate as films, poetry as computer science, and music as military equipment. This volume collects writings from all stages of the author's prolific career. Exemplary essays illustrate how matters of form and inscription make heterogeneous source material (e.g., literary classics and computer design) interchangea
Metamorphoses of the vampire in literature and film : cultural transformations in Europe, 1732-1933 by Erik Butler( )

22 editions published between 2010 and 2013 in English and held by 709 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Metamorphoses of the Vampire explains why representations of vampirism began in the eighteenth century, flourished in the nineteenth, and came to eclipse nearly all other forms of monstrosity in the early twentieth century. Many of the works by French and German authors discussed here have never been presented to students and scholars in the English-speaking world. While there are many excellent studies that examine Victorian vampires, the undead in cinema, contemporary vampire fictions, and the vampire in folklore, until now no work has attempted to account for the unifying logic that underlies the vampire's many and often apparently contradictory forms."--Jacket
The rise of the vampire by Erik Butler( Book )

11 editions published between 2013 and 2016 in English and Japanese and held by 472 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Before Bella and Edward there were The Lost Boys and the gang in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Before True Blood came Dark Shadows and Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles. Before them all there was the most famous vampire of all time: Count Dracula, immortalized by Bram Stoker in 1897. Whether characterized as urbane aristocrats, animalistic monsters or brooding teenagers, as creatures of the day or of the night, it seems vampires have captured the popular imagination for centuries. Today they are a worldwide phenomenon, featuring in everything from Jamaican reggae songs to Japanese and Korean horror films. Why have vampires gone viral? In The Rise of the Vampire, Erik Butler explains our enduring fascination with the undead by examining folklore, literature, film, television, journalism and music. Although vampires evoke an age-old mystery, they also embody the uncertainties of the modern world: the superficial fulfillment of desires in a digital age and the anonymity of life in the global metropolis. Whether you're a fan of classic vampire tales or prefer the recent additions to the canon, The Rise of the Vampire is a fascinating look at our collective obsession with the undead."--Publisher's website
The burnout society by Byung-Chul Han( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 415 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Our competitive, service-oriented societies are taking a toll on the late-modern individual. Rather than improving life, multitasking, "user-friendly" technology, and the culture of convenience are producing disorders that range from depression to attention deficit disorder to borderline personality disorder. Byung-Chul Han interprets the spreading malaise as an inability to manage negative experiences in an age characterized by excessive positivity and the universal availability of people and goods. Stress and exhaustion are not just personal experiences, but social and historical phenomena as well. Denouncing a world in which every against-the-grain response can lead to further disempowerment, he draws on literature, philosophy, and the social and natural sciences to explore the stakes of sacrificing intermittent intellectual reflection for constant neural connection. -- Provided by publisher
On Hitler's Mein kampf : the poetics of National Socialism by Albrecht Koschorke( )

8 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 380 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"By examining the text [Mein Kampf] and the signals that it sends...we can discover for whom Hitler strikes his propagandistic poses and who is excluded. Koschorke parses the borrowings from the right-wing press, the autobiographical details concocted to make political points, the attack on the Social Democrats that bleeds into an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory, the contempt for science, and the conscious attempt to trigger outrage. A close reading of National Socialism's definitive text, Koschorke concludes, can shed light on the dynamics of fanaticism. This lesson of Mein Kampf still needs to be learned."--
In the swarm : digital prospects by Byung-Chul Han( )

7 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 326 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Digital communication and social media have taken over our lives. In this contrarian reflection on digitized life, Byung-Chul Han counters the cheerleaders for Twitter revolutions and Facebook activism by arguing that digital communication is in fact responsible for the disintegration of community and public space and is slowly eroding any possibility for real political action and meaningful political discourse. In the predigital, analog era, by the time an angry letter to the editor had been composed, mailed, and received, the immediate agitation had passed. Today, digital communication enables instantaneous, impulsive reaction, meant to express and stir up outrage on the spot. Meanwhile, the public, the senders and receivers of these communications have become a digital swarm -- not a mass, or a crowd, or Negri and Hardt's antiquated notion of a "multitude," but a set of isolated individuals incapable of forming a "we," incapable of calling dominant power relations into question, incapable of formulating a future because of an obsession with the present. The digital swarm is a fragmented entity that can focus on individual persons only in order to make them an object of scandal. Han, one of the most widely read philosophers in Europe today, describes a society in which information has overrun thought, in which the same algorithms are employed by Facebook, the stock market, and the intelligence services. Democracy is under threat because digital communication has made freedom and control indistinguishable. Big Brother has been succeeded by Big Data."
The agony of eros by Byung-Chul Han( )

8 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 276 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Byung-Chul Han is one of the most widely read philosophers in Europe today, a member of the new generation of German thinkers that includes Markus Gabriel and Armen Avanessian. In The Agony of Eros, a bestseller in Germany, Han considers the threat to love and desire in today's society. For Han, love requires the courage to accept self-negation for the sake of discovering the Other. In a world of fetishized individualism and technologically mediated social interaction, it is the Other that is eradicated, not the self. In today's increasingly narcissistic society, we have come to look for love and desire within the inferno of the same. Han offers a survey of the threats to Eros, drawing on a wide range of sources -- Lars von Trier's film Melancholia, Wagner's Tristan und Isolde, Fifty Shades of Grey, Michel Foucault (providing a scathing critique of Foucault's valorization of power), Martin Buber, Hegel, Baudrillard, Flaubert, Barthes, Plato, and others. Han considers the pornographication of society, and shows how pornography profanes eros; addresses capitalism's leveling of essential differences; and discusses the politics of rros in today's burnout society. To be dead to love, Han argues, is to be dead to thought itself. Concise in its expression but unsparing in its insight, The Agony of Eros is an important and provocative entry in Han's ongoing analysis of contemporary society. This remarkable essay, an intellectual experience of the first order, affords one of the best ways to gain full awareness of and join in one of the most pressing struggles of the day: the defense, that is to say -- as Rimbaud desired it -- the reinvention of love. -- from the foreword by Alain Badiou
The transparency society by Byung-Chul Han( Book )

8 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 261 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Transparency is the order of the day. It is a term, a slogan, that dominates public discourse about corruption and freedom of information. Considered crucial to democracy, it touches our political and economic lives as well as our private lives. Anyone can obtain information about anything. Everything -and everyone- has become transparent: unveiled or exposed by the apparatuses that exert a kind of collective control over the post-capitalist world. For transparency has a dark side that, ironically, has everything to do with a lack of mystery, shadow, and nuance. Behind the apparent accessibility of knowledge lies the disappearance of privacy, homogenization, and the collapse of trust. The anxiety to accumulate ever more information does not necessarily produce more knowledge or faith. Technology creates the illusion of total containment and constant monitoring of information, but what we lack is adequate interpretation of the information. In this manifesto, Byung-Chul Han denounces transparency as a false ideal, the strongest and most pernicious of our contemporary mythologies."--
Tragedy and dramatic theatre by Hans-Thies Lehmann( )

9 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 228 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Phantasia and "seeing" -- The ghostly, terror, death -- Tragic experience -- Distance and dis-dance, beyond form -- Shape, artist, do not speak! -- The "vegetal" hero, experience, concept -- "Stammerings in a foreign language" -- Thinking on the stage -- 2 Approaches to the tragic -- The tragic mode -- The tragic in everyday language and in the study of literature and theatre -- Aspects of the tragic -- Two models: conflict and transgression -- Versions of transgression -- 3 Casus Seneca: Tragedy and the hyperbole of revenge -- Hyperbole, nefas, furor -- Revenge and the tragic theatre
All and nothing : a digital apocalypse by Martin Burckhardt( )

6 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 212 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1854, the British mathematician George Boole presented the idea of a universe the elements of which could be understood in terms of the logic of absence and presence: 0 and 1, all and nothing - the foundation of binary code. The Boolean digits 0 and 1 do not designate a quantity. In the Boolean world, x times x always equals x; all and nothing meet in the formula x = x n. As everything becomes digitized, God the clockmaker is replaced by God the programmer. This book - described by its authors as "a theology for the digital world" - explores meaning in a digital age of infinite replication, in a world that has dissolved into information and achieved immortality by turning into a pure sign. All and Nothing compares information that spreads without restraint to a hydra - the mythological monster that grew two heads for every one that was cut off. Information is thousand-headed and thousand-eyed because Hydra's tracks cannot be deleted. It shows that when we sit in front of a screen, we are actually on the other side, looking at the world as an uncanny reminder of the nondigitized. It compares our personal data to our shadows and our souls, envisioning the subconscious laid out on a digital bier like a corpse. The digital world, the authors explain, summons forth fantasies of a chiliastic or apocalyptic nature. The goal of removing the representative from mathematics has now been achieved on a greater scale than Boole could have imagined
The exform by Nicolas Bourriaud( Book )

4 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 147 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Nicolas Bourriaud is a leading theorist and art curator. Here he looks to the future of art as a place to tackle the excluded, the disposable, and waste--the exform. He argues that the great theoretical battles to understand the present will be fought in the realms of ideology, psychoanalysis and art and a "realist" theory and practice must begin by uncovering the mechanisms that create the distinctions between the productive and the unproductive, the assimilable and the inassimilable, and the includ-ed and the excluded. To do this we must go back to one of the greatest theorists of ideology, Althusser, and examine how ideology conditions political discourse in ways that normalize cultural, racial and economic practices of exclusion"--
Psychopolitics : neoliberalism and new technologies of power by Byung-Chul Han( Book )

7 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 145 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Byung-Chul Han, a star of German philosophy, continues his passionate critique of neoliberalism, trenchantly describing a regime of technological domination that, in contrast to Foucault's biopower, has discovered the productive force of the psyche. In the course of discussing all the facets of neoliberal psychopolitics fueling our contemporary crisis of freedom, Han elaborates an analytical framework that provides an original theory of Big Data and a lucid phenomenology of emotion. But this provocative essay proposes counter models too, presenting a wealth of ideas and surprising alternatives at every turn."--Publisher's description
The 'Bellum grammaticale' and the rise of European literature by Erik Butler( Book )

12 editions published between 2010 and 2016 in English and held by 133 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The now-forgotten genre of the bellum grammaticale flourished in the sixteenth- and seventeenth centuries as a means of satirizing outmoded cultural institutions and promoting new methods of instruction. Butler examines representations of language as war in texts written in Latin, French, and German; the study, by exploring the relationship between tradition and innovation, also illuminates the shift from a Latin-based understanding of learning to the acceptance of vernacular erudition and the emergence of national literatures
Regrowth : seven tales of Jewish life before, during, and after Nazi occupation by Nister( )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 129 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A neglected masterpiece of Holocaust literature, Regrowth offers an account of Jewish life that is unsparing and unsentimental, yet full of Humanity. Der Nister-- his name a pseudonym meaning "The Hidden One"--Writes about communities in Eastern Europe at a disastrous moment in history, but his themes achieve universal dimensions. The tales in this collection refuse easy moral judgments and often blur the line between perpetrator and victim. Members of Jewish Coucils display noble motives even as they collaborate with Nazi occupiers, and resistence fighters perform acts of betrayal and violence toward their own. Neither danger nor safety appears without a mask. Like his contemporary Kafka, to whom he is often compared, Der Nister writes in a deceptively simple style that exerts a powerful hold long after one has finihsed reading. The morally complex characters and richly layered stories of Regrowth ultimately reclaim a more nuanced view of crimes still not fully reckoned."--Back cover
Felt time : the science of how we experience time by Marc Wittmann( Book )

4 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We have widely varying perceptions of time. Children have trouble waiting for anything. ("Are we there yet?") Boredom is often connected to our sense of time passing (or not passing). As people grow older, time seems to speed up, the years flitting by without a pause. How does our sense of time come about? In Felt Time, Marc Wittmann explores the riddle of subjective time, explaining our perception of time--whether moment by moment, or in terms of life as a whole. Drawing on the latest insights from psychology and neuroscience, Wittmann offers a new answer to the question of how we experience time. Wittmann explains, among other things, how we choose between savoring the moment and deferring gratification; why impulsive people are bored easily, and why their boredom is often a matter of time; whether each person possesses a personal speed, a particular brain rhythm distinguishing quick people from slow people; and why the feeling of duration can serve as an "error signal," letting us know when it is taking too long for dinner to be ready or for the bus to come. He considers the practice of mindfulness, and whether it can reduce the speed of life and help us gain more time, and he describes how, as we grow older, subjective time accelerates as routine increases; a fulfilled and varied life is a long life. Evidence shows that bodily processes--especially the heartbeat---underlie our feeling of time and act as an internal clock for our sense of time. And Wittmann points to recent research that connects time to consciousness; ongoing studies of time consciousness, he tells us, will help us to understand the conscious self.--Publisher website
Atlas of poetic botany by Francis Hallé( Book )

3 editions published between 2018 and 2019 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Botanical encounters in the rainforest: trees that walk, a leaf as big as an awning, a plant that dances. This Atlas invites the reader to tour the farthest reaches of the rainforest in search of exotic-poetic-plant life. Guided in these botanical encounters by Francis Halle, who has spent forty years in pursuit of the strange and beautiful plant specimens of the rainforest, the reader discovers a plant with just one solitary, monumental leaf; an invasive hyacinth; a tree that walks; a parasitic laurel; and a dancing vine. Further explorations reveal the Rafflesia arnoldii, the biggest flower in the world, with a crown of stamens and pistils the color of rotten meat that exude the stench of garbage in the summer sun; underground trees with leaves that form a carpet on the ground above them; and the biggest tree in Africa, which can reach seventy meters (more than 200 feet) in height, with a four-meter (about 13 feet) diameter. Halle's drawings, many in color, provide a witty accompaniment. Like any good tour guide, Halle tells stories to illustrate his facts. Readers learn about, among other things, Queen Victoria's rubber tree; legends of the moabi tree (for example, that powder from the bark confers invisibility); a flower that absorbs energy from a tree; plants that imitate other plants; a tree that rains; and a fern that clones itself. Halle's drawings represent an investment in time that returns a dividend of wonder more satisfying than the ephemeral thrill afforded by the photograph. The Atlas of Poetic Botany allows us to be amazed by forms of life that seem as strange as visitors from another planet. Translated from French by Erik Butler
Strauss by Laurenz Lütteken( Book )

4 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 109 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Richard Strauss is an outlier in the context of twentieth century music. Some consider him a composer of the late romantic period, while others declare him a traitor of modernity for his role in National Socialism. Despite the controversy surrounding him, Strauss's works-even beyond his most well-known operas Elektra and Rosenkavalier-are present in the repertories of concert halls worldwide and continue to enjoy large audiences. The details of the composer's life, however, remain shrouded in mystery and gossip. Laurenz Lutteken's Strauss presents a fresh approach to understanding this elusive composer's life and works. Dispensing with stereotypes and sensationalism, it reveals Strauss to be a sensitive intellectual and representative of modernity, with all light and shade of the turn of the twentieth century
Disagreeable tales by Léon Bloy( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Thirty tales of theft, onanism, incest, murder and a host of other forms of perversion and cruelty from the "ungrateful beggar" and "pilgrim of the absolute," Léon Bloy. "Disagreeable Tales," first published in French in 1894, collects Bloy's narrative sermons from the depths: a cauldron of frightful anecdotes and inspired misanthropy that represents a high point of the French Decadent movement and the most emblematic entry into the library of the "Cruel Tale" christened by Villiers de l'Isle-Adam. Whether depicting parents and offspring being sacrificed for selfish gains, or imbeciles sacrificing their own individuality on a literary whim, these tales all draw sustenance from an underlying belief: the root of religion is crime against man, nature and God, and that in this hell on earth, even the worst among us has a soul
 
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Metamorphoses of the vampire in literature and film : cultural transformations in Europe, 1732-1933
Covers
The 'Bellum grammaticale' and the rise of European literatureRegrowth : seven tales of Jewish life before, during, and after Nazi occupation
Alternative Names
Butler, Erik 1971-...

Butler, H. Erik.

Butler, H. Erik 1971-

Erik Butler born:1971 Butler, Erik

バトラー, エリック

Languages
English (151)

Japanese (2)