WorldCat Identities

Sambath Thet 1968-

Overview
Works: 9 works in 34 publications in 1 language and 1,124 library holdings
Genres: History  Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Nonfiction television programs  Documentary television programs 
Roles: Director, Narrator, Author of screenplay, Producer, Cinematographer , Author
Classifications: DS554.83.N86, 959.6042
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Sambath Thet
 
Most widely held works by Sambath Thet
Behind the killing fields : a Khmer Rouge leader and one of his victims by Gina Chon( )

5 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 561 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In recent history, atrocities have often been committed in the name of lofty ideals. One of the most disturbing examples took place in Cambodia's Killing Fields, where tens of thousands of victims were executed and hastily disposed of by Khmer Rouge cadres. Nearly thirty years after these bloody purges, two journalists entered the jungles of Cambodia to uncover secrets still buried there. Based on more than 1,000 hours of interviews with the top surviving Khmer Rouge leader, Nuon Chea, Behind the Killing Fields follows the journey of a man who began as a dedicated freedom fighter and wound up accused of crimes against humanity. Known as Brother Number 2, Chea was Pol Pot's top lieutenant. He is now in prison, facing prosecution in a United Nations-Cambodian tribunal for his actions during the Khmer Rouge rule, when more than two million Cambodians died. The book traces how the seeds of the Killing Fields were sown and what led one man to believe that mass killing was necessary for the greater good. Coauthor Sambath Thet, a Khmer Rouge survivor, shares his personal perspectives on the murderous regime and how some victims have managed to rebuild their lives. The stories of Nuon Chea and Sambath Thet collide when the two meet. While Thet holds Chea responsible for the death of his parents and brother, he strives for understanding over revenge in order to reveal the forces that destroyed his homeland in the name of creating utopia. In this age of suicide bombers and terror alerts, the world is still at a loss to comprehend the violence of zealots. Behind the Killing Fields bravely confronts this challenge in an exclusive portrait of one man's political madness and another's personal wisdom. Gina Chon is a reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Sambath Thet writes for the Phnom Penh Post
Enemies of the people : [a personal journey into the heart of the killing fields]( Visual )

13 editions published between 2009 and 2011 in English and held by 313 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The men and women who perpetrated the Cambodian killing fields massacres -- from the foot soldiers who slit throats to the party's ideological leader, Nuon Chea, aka Brother Number Two -- break a 30-year silence to give testimony never before heard or seen. Unprecedented access from top to bottom of the Khmer Rouge has been achieved through a decade of work by one of Cambodia's top investigative journalists, Thet Sambath
Enemies of the People by Robert Lemkin( Visual )

8 editions published between 2009 and 2014 in English and held by 226 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Enemies of the People the men and women who perpetrated the massacres - from the foot-soldiers who slit throats to the party's ideological leader, Nuon Chea aka Brother Number Two - break a 30-year silence to give testimony never before heard or seen. Unprecedented access from top to bottom of the Khmer Rouge has been achieved through a decade of work by one of Cambodia's best investigative journalists, Thet Sambath. Sambath is on a personal quest: he lost his own family in the Killing Fields. The film is his journey to discover not how but why they died. In doing so, he hears and understands for the first time the real story of his country's tragedy. After years of visits and trust-building, Sambath finally persuades Brother Number Two to admit (again, for the first time) in detail how he and Pol Pot (the two supreme powers in the Khmer Rouge state) decided to kill party members whom they considered 'Enemies of the People'. Sambath's remarkable work goes even one stage further: over the years he befriends a network of killers in the provinces who implemented the kill policy. For the first time, we see how orders created on an abstract political level translate into foul murder in the rice fields and forests of the Cambodian plain. We have repeatedly used the expression 'for the first time'. This is because Sambath's work represents a watershed both in Cambodian historiography and in the country's quest for closure on one of the world's darkest episodes. The United Nations and the Cambodian government have set up a tribunal to try the senior leaders of the Khmer Rouge for international crimes. Brother Number Two's trial is expected to start in 2010. The trials are widely expected to deliver a form of justice but fewer expect the truth finally to come out through this process. Sambath says: "Some may say no good can come from talking to killers and dwelling on past horror, but I say these people have sacrificed a lot to tell the truth. In daring to confess they have done good, perhaps the only good thing left. They and all the killers like them must be part of the process of reconciliation if my country is to move forward."
One day at Po Chrey : anatomy of a massacre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The UN estimates 3000 were killed in the Khmer Rouge Po Chrey massacre. But journalist Thet Sambath tracked down several perpetrators for the first time and discovered the truth is much more alarming. "I created a relaxed atmosphere so they didn't suspect what was about to happen", describes one ex-Khmer Rouge soldier. "I saw my uncle in the group. I was scared I would be implicated and die alongside him, so I avoided his glance". Award-winning journalist and genocide survivor, Thet Sambath, is known worldwide for obtaining Khmer Rouge confessions on camera. The evidence he gathered for this report suggests the massacre at Po Chrey may have been the greatest single day atrocity since World War Two, exceeding even Srebrenica. The blank stares and half-smiles of the soldiers jar disturbingly with the horrors they are calmly confessing to. Revisiting a pond that was once over-flowing with bodies, perpetrator In Thoen recalls, "scalps were flying, shredded by bullets. The stench of blood was too strong so I stood upwind". A local farmer remembers how as a young boy he played with the severed heads of his neighbours. Putting these accounts to Nuon Chea, Brother Number 2, he shrugs. "I don't deny it happened. But I didn't know at the time."
Behind the Killing Fields: A Khmer Rouge Leader and One of His Victims (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) by Gina Chon( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Enemies of the people : [a personal journey into the heart of the killing fields]( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The men and women who perpetrated the Cambodian killing fields massacres -- from the foot soldiers who slit throats to the party's ideological leader, Nuon Chea, aka Brother Number Two -- break a 30-year silence to give testimony never before heard or seen. Unprecedented access from top to bottom of the Khmer Rouge has been achieved through a decade of work by one of Cambodia's top investigative journalists, Thet Sambath
Enemies of the people : [a personal journey into the heart of the killing fields]( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Voices from the killing fields( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Khmer Rouge slaughtered nearly two million people in the late 1970s. Yet the Killing Fields of Cambodia remain unexplained. Investigative journalist Thet Sambath spent a decade gaining the trust of the men and women who perpetrated the massacres. From the foot soldiers who slit throats, to Pol Pot's right-hand man, the notorious Brother Number Two, Sambath records shocking testimonies never before seen or heard. Having neglected his own family for years, Sambath's work comes at a price. But this is a personal mission. He lost his parents and siblings in the Killing Fields, and on his journey to discover why his family died, the real story of Cambodia's tragedy emerges
ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.35 (from 0.31 for Behind the ... to 0.78 for ENEMIES OF ...)

WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Behind the killing fields : a Khmer Rouge leader and one of his victims Behind the Killing Fields: A Khmer Rouge Leader and One of His Victims (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights)
Covers
Behind the Killing Fields: A Khmer Rouge Leader and One of His Victims (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights)
Alternative Names
Sambath, Thet 1967

Thet, Sambath 1967

Thet, Sambath 1968-

Thet Sambath journalist

Thet Sambath kambodschanischer Journalist

Languages
English (33)