WorldCat Identities

Orr, Timothy J.

Overview
Works: 7 works in 22 publications in 1 language and 2,820 library holdings
Genres: Biography  Personal narrativesā€”vAmerican  Personal narratives  Autobiographies  History  Records and correspondence  Biographies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Timothy J Orr
Last to leave the field : the life and letters of First Sergeant Ambrose Henry Hayward, 28th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry by Ambrose Henry Hayward( )

7 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 1,504 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Revealing the mind-set of a soldier seared by the horrors of combat even as he kept faith in his cause, Last to Leave the Field showcases the private letters of Ambrose Henry Hayward, a Massachusetts native who served in the 28th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Hayward & rsquo;s service, which began with his enlistment in the summer of 1861 and ended three years later following his mortal wounding at the Battle of Pine Knob in Georgia, took him through a variety of campaigns in both the Eastern and Western theaters of the war. He saw action in five states, participating in the battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg as well as in the Chattanooga and Atlanta campaigns. Through his letters to his parents and siblings, we observe the early idealism of the young recruit, and then, as one friend after another died beside him, we witness how the war gradually hardened him. Yet, despite the increasing brutality of what would become America & rsquo;s costliest conflict, Hayward continually reaffirmed his faith in the Union cause, reenlisting for service late in 1863. Hayward & rsquo;s correspondence takes us through many of the war & rsquo;s most significant developments, including the collapse of slavery and the enforcement of Union policy toward Southern civilians. Also revealed are Hayward & rsquo;s feelings about Confederates, his assessments of Union political and military leadership, and his attitudes toward desertion, conscription, forced marches, drilling, fighting, bravery, cowardice, and comradeship. Ultimately, Hayward & rsquo;s letters reveal the emotions & mdash;occasionally guarded but more often expressed with striking candor & mdash;of a soldier who at every battle resolved to be, as one comrade described him, & ldquo;the first to spring forward and the last to leave the field. & rdquo; Timothy J. Orr is an assistant professor of military history at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia
Never call me a hero : a legendary American dive-bomber pilot remembers the Battle of Midway by N. Jack Kleiss( Book )

5 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 901 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

75 years ago, one daring American pilot may have changed the course of history when he struck and sank two Japanese carriers at the Battle of Midway. Now, legendary dive-bomber "Dusty" Kleiss shares his unforgettable eyewitness account of America's greatest naval victory
Last to Leave the Field : the Life and Letters of First Sergeant Ambrose Henry Hayward, 28th Pennsylvania Volunteers by Timothy J Orr( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 334 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Revealing the mind-set of a soldier seared by the horrors of combat even as he kept faith in his cause, Last to Leave the Field showcases the private letters of Ambrose Henry Hayward, a Massachusetts native who served in the 28th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Hayward's service, which began with his enlistment in the summer of 1861 and ended three years later following his mortal wounding at the Battle of Pine Knob in Georgia, took him through a variety of campaigns in both the Eastern and Western theaters of the war. He saw action in five states, participating in the battles of A
Never call me a hero : a legendary American dive-bomber pilot remembers the Battle of Midway by N. Jack Kleiss( Recording )

6 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An extraordinary firsthand account of the Battle of Midway by one of its key participants, timed to the 75th anniversary: American dive-bomber pilot "Dusty" Kleiss helped sink three Japanese warships (including two aircraft carriers), received the Navy Cross, and is credited with playing a decisive individual role in determining the outcome of a battle that is considered a turning point in World War II. In Never Call Me a Hero, Captain Kleiss (USN, ret.), a U.S. Navy SBD Dauntless dive-bomber pilot with the USS Enterprise's Scouting Squadron Six, tells his full story for the first time, offering an unprecidently intimate look at the battle that reversed America's fortunes after the tragedy of Pearl Harbor. Kleiss is notable for being the only pilot from either fleet on those battle-scarred days of legend, June 4-7, 1942, to land hits on three different enemy ships. On the first day of the Battle of Midway, Kleiss planted bombs on two Japanese carriers--Kaga and Hiryu--sinking both, and later, on June 6, he scored a direct hit on a Japanese cruiser, the Mikuma, which also sank. In his 1967 book Incredible Victory, Walter Lord asserted that the margins of U.S. victory at Midway were so thin that individual participants could rightfully say that their actions turned the tide. Given the amount of destruction inflicted upon the Japanese that day, Kleiss may have been the most important pilot in the air. It is no stretch to say that without him, the Battle of Midway may not have been won, altering the course of the conflict and history itself; for according the U.S. Navy's historians: "The Battle of Midway was far more than an epic WWII clash somewhere far away at sea. It was an American victory that forever changed the course of world history. This is the battle that turned the tide of the war." But this is not only the memoir of one man; it is the history of this battle and its legacy. In only five minutes, forty-eight American dive bomber pilots and their gunners destroyed the pride of the Japanese carrier fleet and exacted retribution on the carrier force that had attacked Pearl Harbor. Never Call Me a Hero is also a story about humility and pushing limits. Throughout his life, Kleiss had always looked toward the heavens for spiritual guidance, and to serve his country. Throughout his life, this humble man considered himself blessed with incredible luck and did his job without complaint. Whenever others referred to his actions as "heroic," he quickly corrected them "I'm no hero. Never call me a hero."
Last to Leave the Field( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Never call me a hero : an autobiography of a battle of midway dive bomber pilot by N. Jack Kleiss( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jack "Dusty" Kleiss and the Battle of Midway by Timothy J Orr( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.08 (from 0.01 for Last to le ... to 0.90 for Jack "Dust ...)

Last to leave the field : the life and letters of First Sergeant Ambrose Henry Hayward, 28th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
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Languages
English (22)