WorldCat Identities

Johnson, Jean 1949-

Overview
Works: 57 works in 132 publications in 1 language and 2,085 library holdings
Genres: Popular works  History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HJ2052, 336.73
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jean Johnson
Where does the money go? : your guided tour to the federal budget crisis by Scott Bittle( Book )

11 editions published between 2008 and 2014 in English and held by 614 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A layperson's guide to how government financial decisions affect one's retirement, health-care, mortgage, and other concerns explains how decision makers are influencing tax allocations and the federal deficit
Where did the jobs go-- and how do we get them back? : your guided tour to America's employment crisis by Scott Bittle( Book )

5 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 435 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Defining the fundamental concepts that shape the varying economic and job proposals, a primer on the nation's job crisis examines conflicting views on the causes of contemporary unemployment in the United States and how to handle it
Who turned out the lights? : your guided tour to the energy crisis by Scott Bittle( Book )

5 editions published between 2009 and 2014 in English and held by 173 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents an entertaining and nonpartisan view of the energy crisis, examining the politics behind energy consumption and conservation and explaining alternatives in easy-to-understand terms
You can't do it alone : a communications and engagement manual for school leaders committed to reform by Jean Johnson( Book )

7 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"You Can't Do It Alone provides school leaders with a crisp summary of opinion research among teachers, parents, and the public conducted by Public Agenda, Education Sector and other respected analysts. It offers tips on what leaders can do to more successfully engage these groups in areas such as reforming teacher evaluation, turning around low-performing schools, and building support for world-class standards"--Provided by publisher
First things first : what Americans expect from the public schools : a report from Public Agenda by Jean Johnson( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kids these days : what Americans really think about the next generation : a report from Public Agenda by Steve Farkas( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A sense of calling : who teaches and why by Steve Farkas( Book )

4 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report discusses why new teachers enter the profession and what they think of it now that they are teaching. It also examines the perspectives of young college graduates in other professions and captures the observations of school superintendents and principals. Researchers conducted telephone interviews with members of each group and focus groups with beginning teachers and college graduates. Results indicated that beginning teachers were motivated, committed, and doing what they wanted to do. Low salaries kept some people out of teaching, though incentives other than salaries actually attracted people to the profession. Teachers wanted smaller classes and more administrative and parental support. Almost one in five young graduates in other fields expressed real interest in teaching, and it was not low salaries keeping them away but rather the worry that they could not make a difference. Teachers believed that good teaching comes from what happens daily in the classroom, not from the pages of a book. Six chapters discuss: (1) "Are New Teachers Demoralized and Uncommitted?" (2) "Are Talented Young People Avoiding the Profession?" (3) "Is Money the Problem?" (4) "Is Certification the Problem?" (5) "Is Teacher Preparation the Problem?" And (6) "Do Working Conditions Undermine Teacher Performance?" (Contains 10 endnotes.) (Sm)
Assignment incomplete : the unfinished business of education reform : a report from Public Agenda by Jean Johnson( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This publication is a followup report to Public Agenda's 1994 study on public-school education, entitled "First Things First." The publication reports findings of a 1995 study that investigated the public's perspective on school restructuring. Data were derived from a national telephone survey of 1,200 Americans, including 439 parents of children in school and 237 public-school teachers; and a mail survey of 734 decision makers in government, business, the media, and 417 educational administrators. Findings indicate that despite their disappointment with public schools, most people were not ready to dismantle the public education system. However, they were confused and frustrated about how to get the system to work--to provide the environment and standards conducive to teaching and learning. Second, 9 in 10 Americans (92%) agreed that teaching basics such as reading, writing, and arithmetic was "absolutely essential." Third, people strongly supported the creation and enforcement of higher academic standards, which they believed would improve student motivation and increase learning. Finally, most respondents did not place a high value on knowledge for its own sake. Fifty-nine percent of the general public said that a diploma is important because employers are reluctant to hire people without one, while 60 percent of leaders said that a diploma is important because it represents skills and knowledge that are useful on the job. Seven tables, methodological notes, and a list of related Public Agenda publications are included. (Lmi)
Different drummers : how teachers of teachers view public education( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Getting by : what American teenagers really think about their schools : a report from Public Agenda by Jean Johnson( Book )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many school-standards manuals suggest that if educators set clear standards and back those standards with effective teaching, most students will achieve the goals set for them. This report describes the motivations and behaviors of students themselves. Data were derived from a nationwide telephone survey of 1,000 randomly selected public high school students and 250 private-school students, focus-group interviews, and case studies of students in Jefferson County, Kentucky, and San Francisco, California. Public-school adolescents reported shortcomings in their schools more frequently than did private-school students. Most students in both public and private schools reported that curriculum apart from the basics is irrelevant; getting an education is important; more rigorous standards would make them work harder; and the attention of teachers is the key motivation for learning. Private school-students expressed more positive views about their teachers than did public school students; students and teachers in public schools complained of a lack of respect and civility; African-American and Hispanic teens supported higher standards for all students; and private-school students were significantly more positive about their schools and teachers than were students in public schools. Eleven tables are included. (Contains 18 endnotes.) (Lmi)
Given the circumstances : teachers talk about public education today by Public Agenda Foundation( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A report, based primarily on results from two national telephone surveys of public school teachers conducted by public Agenda in 1995, on Americans' attitudes towards the public schools. What emerges is a deeply disturbing picture of an American public and community leadership frustrated and angered by the state of public education
The speaker and the listener : a public perspective on freedom of expression by John Immerwahr( Book )

4 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For goodness' sake : why so many want religion to play a greater role in American life by Steve Farkas( Book )

5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report gives the results of a study that probes how typical individuals think about religion, faith, and personal morality. Alongside their belief in the power of religion to help individuals become better people, most people are also instinctively wary about injecting religion directly into politics, the public schools, and public life in general. The controversial question of prayer in the schools was probed more deeply than other studies by asking people to select their ideal school prayer policy. Given a full range of choices, over half of the people questioned think a moment of silence is the best way to deal with prayer in the classroom. The national survey was conducted with 1507 members of the general public and includes the views of Evangelical Christians, Catholics, Jews, and nonreligious individuals. Following an Introduction, the report contains nine chapters: (1) "The Blessings of Religion: Views on How Religion Could Improve American Life"; (2) "As the Twig Is Bent: Views on Religion in the Schools"; (3) "We Gather Together: Views on Religion and Social Interaction"; (4) "Good Government: Views on Religion and Elected Officials"; (5) "The More, the Better? Views on Religious Groups in Politics"; (6) "Evangelical Christians: Evangelical Views on Religion in Politics, the Schools and Social Life"; (7)" Some Beg to Differ: Views of Jewish and Nonreligious Americans on Religion and Public Life"; (8) "The Distinctive Voices of Journalists, Christian Leaders and Elected Officials"; and (9) "An Afterword" (Deborah Wadsworth). Includes 7 tables and 10 notes. Contains methodology information. (BT)
Time to move on : African-Americans and white parents set an agenda for public schools : a report from Public Agenda by Steve Farkas( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This study was conducted as part of a joint project of Public Agenda and the Public Education Network"--Page 2
Faulty diagnosis : public misconceptions about health care reform : a report from the Public Agenda Foundation by John Immerwahr( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On thin ice : how advocates and opponents could misread the public's views on vouchers and charter schools : a report from Public Agenda by Steve Farkas( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Divided within, besieged without : the politics of education in four American school districts by Steve Farkas( Book )

3 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many educators and community members are concerned about public education and attempts at education reform. Communication, conflict, and attempts at consensus are all parts of carrying out education reform. Four school districts in different parts of the country were examined to see how they handled school reform. The study included interviews with more than 200 educators and citizens from school districts of varying sizes in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West. Findings indicated that what started in each district as genuine reform disintegrated because of conflict, poor communication, suspicion, and anger. The consistency of the behavior across the four districts indicates that the problems are not isolated, but systemwide. The most harmful effect of the conflicts was how they distracted professionals from their primary goal: improving educational opportunities for students. Most education reform attempts focus on teaching, curriculum, standards, assessment, and other factors. However, the politics of education reform and the conflicts that arise from trying to implement it are important issues as well. These problems offer some explanation as to why school reform is so difficult to achieve. (Jpt)
A lot to be thankful for : what parents want children to learn about America by Steve Farkas( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Public Agenda's research included interviews with more than 800 parents, exploring their ideas on what the United States stands for and what schoolchildren should be taught about its history and ideals"--Page 7
Necessary compromises : how parents, employers and children's advocates view child care today by Steve Farkas( Book )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Changing attitudes, economics, and social norms have transformed how children are cared for. This nationwide survey examined views of parents, nonparental adults, employers, and children's advocates regarding child care and some of the policy debates these changes have spawned. Data collection methods included telephone surveys of 815 parents of children 5 years or under, interviews with 444 parents of children 6 to 17 and 214 nonparental adults, and mail surveys of 218 employers and 216 children's advocates. Major findings indicated that most parents of young children say they should bear primary child care responsibility. Seventy percent of parents believe that having a full-time parent at home is the best way to provide care for children under 5 years, with nearly half having made arrangements to do so. Parents generally regard day care centers with substantial distrust and often consider them as the option of last resort. Most parents indicated that day care should be improved rather than abandoned. The majority of parents using day care were pleased with their arrangement. Parents were primarily interested in tax policies that would make it more affordable for them to have a parent at home full-time during children's earliest years. Fewer than half the parents thought their employer was doing as much as could be expected about child care. Most employers were sympathetic but found it difficult to offer child care benefits. Child advocates believed that high-quality day care centers could be designed to provide care equivalent to that of parents. (Supportive data tables, endnotes, and a description of the methodology conclude this report.) (KB)
 
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Where does the money go? : your guided tour to the federal budget crisis
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Who turned out the lights? : your guided tour to the energy crisis
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English (65)