WorldCat Identities

Scranton, Roy 1976-

Overview
Works: 14 works in 56 publications in 2 languages and 2,430 library holdings
Genres: Fiction  Short stories  War fiction  Essays  Literature  Forecasts  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Exhibition catalogs 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Roy Scranton
Learning to die in the Anthropocene : reflections on the end of a civilization by Roy Scranton( )

16 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 753 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Coming home from the war in Iraq, US Army private Roy Scranton thought he'd left the world of strife behind. Then he watched as new calamities struck America, heralding a threat far more dangerous than ISIS or Al Qaeda: Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, megadrought--the shock and awe of global warming. Our world is changing. Rising seas, spiking temperatures, and extreme weather imperil global infrastructure, crops, and water supplies. Conflict, famine, plagues, and riots menace from every quarter. From war-stricken Baghdad to the melting Arctic, human-caused climate change poses a danger not only to political and economic stability, but to civilization itself ... and to what it means to be human. Our greatest enemy, it turns out, is ourselves. The warmer, wetter, more chaotic world we now live in--the Anthropocene--demands a radical new vision of human life. In this bracing response to climate change, Roy Scranton combines memoir, reportage, philosophy, and Zen wisdom to explore what it means to be human in a rapidly evolving world, taking readers on a journey through street protests, the latest findings of earth scientists, a historic UN summit, millennia of geological history, and the persistent vitality of ancient literature ... Scranton responds to the existential problem of global warming by arguing that in order to survive, we must come to terms with our mortality. Plato argued that to philosophize is to learn to die. If that's true, says Scranton, then we have entered humanity's most philosophical age--for this is precisely the problem of the Anthropocene. The trouble now is that we must learn to die not as individuals, but as a civilization."--Publisher's description
Fire and forget : short stories from the long war by Matt Gallagher( Book )

7 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 453 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"These stories aren't pretty and they aren't for the faint of heart. They are realistic, haunting and shocking. And they are all unforgettable. Television reports, movies, newspapers and blogs about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have offered images of the fighting there. But this collection offers voices-powerful voices, telling the kind of truth that only fiction can offer. What makes the collection so remarkable is that all of these stories are written by those who were there, or waited for them at home. The anthology, which features a Foreword by National Book Award winner Colum McCann, includes the best voices of the our wars' generation: Brian Turner, whose poem "Hurt Locker" was the movie's inspiration; Colby Buzzell, whose book My War resonates with countless veterans; Siobhan Fallon, whose book You Know When the Men Are Gone echoes the joy and pain of the spouses left behind; Matt Gallagher, whose book Kaboom captures the hilarity and horror of the modern military experience; and nine others. "--
War porn by Roy Scranton( Book )

6 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 392 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

""War porn," n. Videos, images, and narratives featuring graphic violence, often brought back from combat zones, viewed voyeuristically or for emotional gratification. Such media are often presented and circulated without context, though they may be used as evidence of war crimes. War porn is also, in Roy Scranton's searing debut novel, a metaphor for the experience of war in the age of the War on Terror, the fracturing and fragmentation of perspective, time, and self that afflicts soldiers and civilians alike, and the global networks and face-to-face moments that suture our fragmented lives together. In War Porn three lives fit inside one another like nesting dolls: a restless young woman at an end-of-summer barbecue in Utah; an American soldier in occupied Baghdad; and Qasim al-Zabadi, an Iraqi math professor, who faces the US invasion of his country with fear, denial, and perseverance. As War Porn cuts from America to Iraq and back again, as home and hell merge, we come to see America through the eyes of the occupied, even as we see Qasim become a prisoner of the occupation. Through the looking glass of War Porn, Scranton reveals the fragile humanity that connects Americans and Iraqis, torturers and the tortured, victors and their victims"--
The best American science and nature writing 2014( Book )

3 editions published between 2014 and 2016 in English and held by 377 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents a collection of nature and science essays published in American periodicals in 2013, including works by such authors as Katherine Bagley, Barbara Kingsolver, Fred Pearce, and Carl Zimmer
We're doomed. Now what? : essays on war and climate change by Roy Scranton( Book )

3 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 282 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The time we've been thrown into is one of alarming and bewildering change--the breakup of the post-1945 global order, a multispecies mass extinction, and the beginning of the end of civilization as we know it. Not one of us is innocent, not one of us is safe. Now what? We're Doomed, Now What? addresses the crisis that is our time through a series of brilliant, moving, and original essays on climate change, war, literature, and loss, from one of the most provocative and iconoclastic minds of his generation. Whether writing about sailing through the melting Arctic, preparing for Houston's next big storm, watching Star Wars, or going back to the streets of Baghdad he once patrolled as a soldier, Roy Scranton handles his subjects with the same electric, philosophical, demotic touch that he brought to his ground-breaking New York Times essay, "Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene.""
What future : the year's best ideas to reclaim, reanimate & reinvent our future by Roy Scranton( Book )

4 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"... The pieces we've brought together here in What Future are some of the best, most interesting, and most prophetic essays and articles we've found about the future : what it might look like, how we might think about it, and what it might mean. We limited our selection to work published in 2016, with a few exceptions, and tried to balance the mix to address some of the most salient issues we see facing human civilization and American culture over the short-to-middle-term horizon."--page 13
War porn by Roy Scranton( )

5 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The term "war porn" refers to videos and images brought back from combat zones. IED explosions, air strikes, firefights, images of death and gore largely shorn of context, at times even evidence of potential war crimes (most famously, the photos of detainee abuse at Abu Ghraib). "War porn" is also, in Scranton's searing debut, a metaphor for the fragmentation and confusion of modern combat, the broken shards of experience that form the wartime experiences of soldiers and civilians alike. The three sections of War Porn fit inside one another like nesting dolls: from an end of summer barbecue in the American Southwest; to the perspective of a young US soldier in the early months of the occupation of Iraq; to the story of Qasim al-Zabadi, an Iraqi math professor who faces the American invasion with a blend of fear, denial, and perseverance. Through the eyes of the occupiers, we watch Qasim become an interpreter for US forces, then prisoner and victim. As the scene switches from America to Iraq and back again, as home and hell merge, Qasim reveals the fragile humanity that connects occupier and occupied, torturer and tortured
We're doomed. Now what? : [essays on war and climate change] by Roy Scranton( )

6 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The time we've been thrown into is one of alarming and bewildering change-the breakup of the post-1945 global order, a multispecies mass extinction, and the beginning of the end of civilization as we know it. Not one of us is innocent, not one of us is safe. Now what'We're Doomed, Now What' addresses the crisis that is our time through a series of brilliant, moving, and original essays on climate change, war, literature, and loss, from one of the most provocative and iconoclastic minds of his generation. Whether writing about sailing through the melting Arctic, preparing for Houston's next big storm, watching <I<Star Wars, or going back to the streets of Baghdad he once patrolled as a soldier, Roy Scranton handles his subjects with the same electric, philosophical, demotic touch that he brought to his ground-breaking New York Times essay, "Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene."
I heart Oklahoma! by Roy Scranton( Book )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A bleeding-edge contemporary novel that dives into the heart of Donald Trump's America. Three artists set out across the country to make a movie. There's Suzie, the jaded writer; Jim, a corporate suit-turned-video artist who survived 9/11; and a hipster videographer, Remy. They team up to make a piece of "road movie" video/performance art about about "freedom and democracy and starting over and making a clean break and moving forward and making America great again." From that jumping-off point, Roy Scranton takes us on a provocative, genderqueer, shape-shifting response to our current moment.I Heart Oklahomais a non-linear, formally daring book about art, guns, American landscapes, American history, and American stupidity, that moves from a bleeding-edge look at our current moment to a furious, Faulknerian retelling of the Charlie Starkweather spree killings of the 1950s, capturing along the way in its fragmented, mesmerizing form, the violence that has always been near the heart of the American dream"--
Total mobilization : World War II and American literature by Roy Scranton( Book )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Itty S. Neuhaus : Sublimation : an iceberg's story by Itty Neuhaus( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We're Doomed. Now What? : Dispatches from the Far Side of Hope by Roy Scranton( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Att lära sig dö i antropocen by Roy Scranton( Book )

1 edition published in 2019 in Swedish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The trauma hero and the lost war: World War II, American literature, and the politics of trauma, 1945--1975 by Roy Scranton( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Trauma Hero and the Lost War: World War II, American Literature, and the Politics of Trauma, 1945--1975 investigates the canonical dominance of trauma narratives in American literary representations of World War II, and works to understand the problem of the hero in American World War II literature as a question of the role of metaphor in wartime political imaginaries. Among the issues I consider are the trauma hero in war literature, the metaphor of the hero in Wallace Stevens and James Jones, representations of bomber crews as sacrificial victims in Joseph Heller's Catch-22 and the poetry of Randall Jarrell, and the rejection of heroism in the comic poetry of Kenneth Koch
 
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