WorldCat Identities

Kim, Deok-Ho

Overview
Works: 29 works in 44 publications in 1 language and 983 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Academic theses 
Roles: Editor, Author, edc
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Deok-Ho Kim
Handbook of biomimetics and bioinspiration by Ali Khademhosseini( )

10 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 763 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Global warming, pollution, food and water shortage, cyberspace insecurity, over-population, land erosion, and an overburdened health care system are major issues facing the human race and our planet. These challenges have presented a mandate to develop ""natural"" or ""green"" technologies using nature and the living system as a guide to rationally design processes, devices, and systems. This approach has given rise to a new paradigm, one in which innovation goes hand-in-hand with less waste, less pollution, and less invasiveness to life on earth. Bioinspiration has also led to the development
Integrative mechanobiology : micro- and nano- techniques in cell mechanobiology( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The first of its kind, this comprehensive resource integrates cellular mechanobiology with micro-nano techniques to provide unrivalled in-depth coverage of the field, including state-of-the-art methods, recent advances, and biological discoveries. Structured in two parts, the first part offers detailed analysis of innovative micro-nano techniques including FRET imaging, electron cryo-microscopy, micropost arrays, nanotopography devices, laser ablation, and computational image analysis. The second part of the book provides valuable insights into the most recent technological advances and discoveries in areas such as stem cell, heart, bone, brain, tumor, and fibroblast mechanobiology. Written by a team of leading experts and well-recognised researchers, this is an essential resource for students and researchers in biomedical engineering
Electromechanical systems( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tissue models( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bioinspired materials( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A house divided" : the Wickersham Commission and national prohibition by Deck-Ho Kim( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Microplatforms for Gradient Field Generation of Various Properties and Biological Applications( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Well-designed microfluidic platforms can be excellent tools to eliminate bottleneck problems or issues that have arisen in biological fields by providing unprecedented high-resolution control of mechanical and chemical microenvironments for cell culture. Among such microtechnologies, the precise generation of biochemical concentration gradients has been highly regarded in the biorelated scientific fields; even today, the principles and mechanisms for gradient generation continue to be refined, and the number of applications for this technique is growing. Here, we review the current status of the concentration gradient generation technologies achieved in various microplatforms and how they have been and will be applied to biological issues, particularly those that have arisen from cancer research, stem cell research, and tissue engineering. We also provide information about the advances and future challenges in the technological aspects of microscale concentration gradient generation
Automation Highlights from the Literature( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cell Dispensing in Low-Volume Range with the Immediate Drop-on-Demand Technology (I-DOT)( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Handling and dosing of cells comprise the most critical step in the microfabrication of cell-based assay systems for screening and toxicity testing. Therefore, the immediate drop-on-demand technology (I-DOT) was developed to provide a flexible noncontact liquid handling system enabling dispensing of cells and liquid without the risk of cross-contamination down to a precise volume in the nanoliter range. Liquid is dispensed from a source plate within nozzles at the bottom by a short compressed air pulse that is given through a quick release valve into the well, thus exceeding the capillary pressure in the nozzle. Droplets of a defined volume can be spotted directly onto microplates or other cell culture devices. We present a study on the performance and biological impact of this technology by applying the cell line MCF-7, human fibroblasts, and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For all cell types tested, viability after dispensing is comparable to the control and exhibits similar proliferation rates in the absence of apoptotic cells, and the differentiation potential of hMSCs is not impaired. The immediate drop-on-demand technology enables accurate cell dosage and offers promising potential for single-cell applications
High-Throughput Viability Assay Using an Autonomously Bioluminescent Cell Line with a Bacterial Lux Reporter( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity
Tissue-engineered arterial tunica media with multi-layered, circumferentially aligned smooth muscle architecture by Shi Ying Calysta Yan( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Blood vessels play an important role in drug screening in terms of permeability and control of blood flow through cellular responses. Three distinctive functional layers make up the architecture of blood vessels, including tunica intima, tunica media and tunica externa. Among all layers, the tunica media layer regulates vascular tone and circumferential alignment of smooth muscle cells in tunica media is crucial to constrictive performances of vessels. Although much research has studied the anisotropic alignment of smooth muscle cells, there is yet a method to fabricate anisotropic smooth muscle cells in a three-dimensional hydrogel to mimic native tunica media. This project addresses the need for an in vitro tissue-engineered tunica media model that replicates in vivo architecture of circumferentially aligned smooth muscle cells in tunica media that is robust and reproducible. The project is divided into three phases: (1) A robust method to fabricate three-dimensional tunica media with circumferentially aligned smooth muscle cells and (2) the characterization and assessment on functional properties of tunica media model. Ultimately, the success of this project allows formation of tunica media with native functionalities through cellular remodeling and mechanical properties to serve as a model of tunica media tissue in blood vessels
Automated Systems( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Engineering of functional, striated muscle tissues with controllable 3D architectures using a novel, thermoresponsive, nanofabricated substratum by Alex Jiao( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Most tissues in the human body demonstrate multiscale organization, from extracellular matrix (ECM) structure, to cell morphologies, to overall tissue architecture. Further, in the cases of cardiac and skeletal muscle, tissue structure is critical to appropriate tissue function. However, current tissue engineering methods lack the ability to properly recreate scaffold-free, cell dense tissues with physiological structures. A platform which could engineer 3D tissues with controllable architectures could thus enable the study of more complex biological phenomenon, such as the effect of tissue structure on skeletal muscle development and engineered cardiac tissue function. For this reason, we developed a simple, yet versatile platform combining a thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) incorporating nanotopographical cues and a gel casting method for the fabrication of scaffold-free 3D tissues with controllable architectures. The developed TNFS could be engineered with a variety of nanotopographies and thus cell monolayer structures which can be spontaneously detached via a change in culture temperature. The detached, nanoengineered cell sheets can then be stacked using our gel casting method to engineer specifically structured, 3D tissues. To this end, we first used the developed TNFS to engineer organized myoblast tissues with specific tissue architectures to demonstrate proof of concept engineering of 3D tissues with layer-by-layer architectural control. We found that using the gel casting method and TNFS, individual aligned myoblast sheets can be stacked into trilayer tissues and maintain individual layer alignment and stacked layer angles without reorganization between the individual sheets, whereas unpatterned controls demonstrated reorganization and layer mixing. We then utilized our developed platform to analyze the effects of engineered myoblast tissue structures on myoblast fusion and subsequent myotube morphology and alignment. We found that parallel-aligned myoblast bilayers could differentiate into aligned myotube sheets in a single layer, however orthogonally-oriented myoblast bilayers lost structural organization during differentiation. Additionally, transferred ECM and tissue structure from the TNFS could provide sufficient alignment cues to allow for the formation of aligned muscle tissue in a 3D microenvironment similar to that of the myofiber niche. Finally, we utilized our developed platform to engineer multilayered human cardiac tissues. We first found that by incorporating a vascular cell population capable of producing ECM, aligned human induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac sheets could be detached and stacked together. We then engineered 4-layer, aligned and helical cardiac tissues as microscale models of physiologically-structured myocardium. Aligned and helical 3D tissues demonstrated different contractile profiles, such as linear and spiraling, and also demonstrated improved contractile function over unpatterned controls, with aligned 3D cardiac tissues demonstrating the largest contractile magnitudes and velocities. These findings highlight the importance of tissue structure on cardiac function, and can be utilized in future works to engineer structured cardiac organoids for eventual in vitro whole-organ experiments. Taken together, these works present a novel platform which can be utilized for a variety of studies to engineer complex cell microenvironments and tissue architectures
Combinatorial maturation strategy for disease modeling and phenotypic drug screening of Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy by Jesse Radcliff Macadangdang( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) offer great promise for regenerative medicine, preclinical drug screening, and cardiac disease modeling applications. One of the most significant hurdles towards adoption of hPSC-CM technologies, however, is cardiomyocyte developmental immaturity. Current differentiation methods produce hPSC-CMs with structural and functional characteristics most closely resembling fetal cardiomyocytes, which significantly hinders our ability to predict patient drug responses or model adult-onset cardiomyopathies. The following dissertation addresses this challenge with the goal of engineering structurally and functionally mature cardiac tissues from hPSC-CMs for in vitro disease modeling and drug screening applications. Here, we present the development of a bio-inspired, combinatorial method for enhancing the maturation of hPSC-CMs that incorporates distinct physical, biochemical, and genetics cues. We began by investigating the role of surface nanotopography on hPSC-CM development and found that, similar to primary cardiomyocytes, hPSC-CMs exhibited a nanotopographic size-dependent phenotype. Utilizing the optimal nanotopographic surfaces dimensions for promoting maturation, we tested whether this maturation cue alone could improve our ability to model the cardiomyopathy associated with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Although we were able to measure a blunted cytoskeletal response to the nanotopography in dystrophin-null hPSC-CMs, this difference was mild and we were unable to detect a functional disease phenotype. We therefore explored more comprehensive methods for inducing hPSC-CM maturation and developed our combinatorial maturation (ComboMat) protocol. The ComboMat protocol incorporates biomimetic nanotopography, thyroid hormone T3, and Let7i microRNA overexpression to produce hPSC-CMs with enhanced sarcomere development, improved electrophysiological and contractile function, improved mitochondrial respiratory capacity, and a transcriptome upregulated for metabolic and muscle development. When the ComboMat protocol is applied to a CRISPR-edited dystrophin knockout (KO) model of DMD cardiomyopathy, a distinctive, endogenously occurring disease phenotype emerges. Mature dystrophin KO hPSC-CMs exhibit greater propensity for arrhythmia with a higher resting cytosolic calcium content compared to Normal hPSC-CM controls. A phenotypic drug screen of dystrophin KO hPSC-CMs using the ComboMat protocol identified compounds that mitigated arrhythmogenic behavior. The ComboMat protocol can be applied to other cardiac disease models, cardiotoxicity studies, or cardiac tissue engineering applications. In vitro screening assays must predict the response of the human heart with high fidelity in order to be adopted. Taken together, this research demonstrates the utility of bioengineering strategies to mature hPSC-CMs in order to develop more biomimetic, adult-like cardiac tissues for preclinical screening applications
Engineering combinatorial microenvironments for structural and functional maturation of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes by Daniel Carson( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

As cardiovascular disease remains to be the leading cause of death worldwide, cardiac regenerative medicine aims to apply design methods to develop functional cardiac tissue for directed therapy as well as in vitro screening assays. Research in this area has shown varying degrees of success, but fully functional cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. This short-coming is due to failures in mimicking native heart tissue in vitro. The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the heart is a complex structure responsible for both biochemical and mechanical cues to the surrounding myocardium. Past research has relied heavily on the use of native biochemical signals of the ECM to influence cardiomyocyte function, but the mechanical signals of heart ECM have been less studied. The ECM of the heart is made up of aligned collagen fibers as well as other important proteins in the basement membrane responsible for cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. The nanoscale collagen fibers have been shown to play a major role in the structural architecture of the overlying macroscopic myocardium. Advancements in nanofabrication techniques have made it possible to study the effect of substrate nanotopography on cardiomyocyte structure and function. The proteins of the basement membrane including laminin and fibronectin have been shown to strongly influence the adhesion of cardiomyocytes through integrin interactions. Recently, a specific repeating amino acid sequence, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), found in many native adhesion proteins, has been shown to promote cell adhesion in vitro¹[superscript comma]². Here we present a platform in which we are able to study the effect of nanoscale structural cues as well as ECM biochemical signals on maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). Using a customized 4 x 4 island nanopatterned substrate, nanogroove widths ranging from 350nm to 2000nm were investigated. We also present the synthesis and incorporation of bifunctionalized peptide, PUA binding peptide-RGD (PUABP-RGD) into the platform to further study the effect of native ECM-like biochemical cues on the structural maturation of hPSC-CMs
Advances in Techniques for Probing Mechanoregulation of Tissue Morphogenesis( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cells process various mechanical cues in the microenvironment to self-organize into high-order architectures during tissue morphogenesis. Impairment of morphogenic processes is the underlying cause of many diseases; as such, understanding the regulatory mechanisms associated with these processes will form the foundation for the development of innovative approaches in cell therapy and tissue engineering. Nevertheless, little is known about how cells collectively respond to mechanical cues in the microenvironment, such as global geometric guidance, local cell-cell interactions, and other physicochemical factors, for the emergence of the structural hierarchy across multiple length scales. To elucidate the mechanoregulation of tissue morphogenesis, numerous approaches based on biochemical, biomaterial, and biophysical techniques have been developed in the past decades. In this review, we summarize techniques and approaches for probing the mechanoregulation of tissue morphogenesis and illustrate their applications in vasculature development. The potential and limitations of these methods are also discussed with a view toward the investigation of a wide spectrum of tissue morphogenic processes
TEER Measurement Techniques for In Vitro Barrier Model Systems( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Transepithelial/transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a widely accepted quantitative technique to measure the integrity of tight junction dynamics in cell culture models of endothelial and epithelial monolayers. TEER values are strong indicators of the integrity of the cellular barriers before they are evaluated for transport of drugs or chemicals. TEER measurements can be performed in real time without cell damage and generally are based on measuring ohmic resistance or measuring impedance across a wide spectrum of frequencies. The measurements for various cell types have been reported with commercially available measurement systems and also with custom-built microfluidic implementations. Some of the barrier models that have been widely characterized using TEER include the blood–brain barrier (BBB), gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and pulmonary models. Variations in these values can arise due to factors such as temperature, medium formulation, and passage number of cells. The aim of this article is to review the different TEER measurement techniques and analyze their strengths and weaknesses, determine the significance of TEER in drug toxicity studies, examine the various in vitro models and microfluidic organs-on-chips implementations using TEER measurements in some widely studied barrier models (BBB, GI tract, and pulmonary), and discuss the various factors that can affect TEER measurements
Mechanoregulation of Myofibroblast Fate and Cardiac Fibrosis( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: During myocardial infarction, myocytes die and are replaced by a specialized fibrotic extracellular matrix, otherwise known as scarring. Fibrotic scarring presents a tremendous hemodynamic burden on the heart, as it creates a stiff substrate, which resists diastolic filling. Fibrotic mechanisms result in permanent scarring which often leads to hypertrophy, arrhythmias, and a rapid progression to failure. Despite the deep understanding of fibrosis in other tissues, acquired through previous investigations, the mechanisms of cardiac fibrosis remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that biochemical cues as well as mechanical cues regulate cells in myocardium. However, the steps in myofibroblast transdifferentiation, as well as the molecular mechanisms of such transdifferentiation in vivo, are poorly understood. This review is focused on defining myofibroblast physiology, scar mechanics, and examining current findings of myofibroblast regulation by mechanical stress, stiffness, and topography for understanding fibrotic disease dynamics. Abstract : The study of cardiac fibrosis is focused on the regulation of myofibroblasts, which are identified to govern the fibrotic process. Recent findings have shown that mechanical cues also have a significant regulatory effect on fibrosis. As such, there has been a rapidly expanding literature published in recent years on bioengineering strategies to regulate fibroblast into myofibroblasts and modulate fibrosis
Effects of nanotopography on structural maturation and differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes by Winnie Wing-Yin Leung( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Heart diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As damages done to the heart are irreversible, heart transplant is the ultimate therapy, but it is greatly limited by the shortage of heart donors. Thus, scientists are attracted by induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a solution because of their ability to be reprogrammed from a somatic cell source, potentially unlimited proliferative properties, and ability to be differentiated into many different cell types. However, hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes display immature phenotypes in contractile properties, electrophysiology, metabolism, structure, and protein isoform expression, thus greatly limiting their application in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug screening. Therefore, there is a great need for a technique to drive the maturation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes to better recapitulate the properties of their adult counterpart. Our approach was to recreate a developmentally-inspired microenvironment for maturing hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). The native myocardium is characterized by aligned extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers and cells have been shown to sense and respond to cues in the ECM. In addition, thyroid hormone is a major regulator of heart development in promoting cell hypertrophy and elongation. Thus, we tested the effects of biomimetic, nanotopographical cues - using an anisotropic nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) composed of nanogrooves and nanoridges in the nanopattern (NP) - combined with thyroid hormone T3 on the structural maturation of cardiomyocytes. We found that cells exposed to nanotopography exhibited structural organization and maturation. However, the effect of T3 was not clear and appeared to have a detrimental effect at prolonged exposure at high concentration. ANFS was also used to differentiate cardiomyocytes from the cardiac progenitor stage and suggested nanotopography could have a positive effect on cardiomyocyte differentiation yield. However, experiments suggested that the differentiating cell population was highly dynamic and responded differently to the replating procedure at different time points. Therefore, a photothermal-responsive polymer was developed to introduce nanotopography with an external light stimulus, and cells were confirmed to stay attached to the polymer substrate with the topographical switch. This resulted in the development of an effective platform with vast potential, allowing the introduction of topographical cues to a cell culture with an easily manipulated external stimulus
 
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English (35)