WorldCat Identities

Pierson, Ashley

Overview
Works: 13 works in 57 publications in 1 language and 5,688 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Author
Classifications: KF3531, 371.2012
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ashley Pierson
Early and school-age care in Santa Monica : current system, policy options, and recommendations by Ashley Pierson( )

21 editions published between 2007 and 2014 in English and held by 2,354 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The landscape of early learning and out-of-school-time programs in the City of Santa Monica is complex, with numerous providers and funding streams. This complexity reflects its evolution in response to changes in federal, state, and local priorities and initiatives. Future shifts in funding levels, program auspices, and other features are likely. In July 2012, the City of Santa Monica Human Services Division and the Santa Monica{u2013}Malibu Unified School District contracted with the RAND Corporation to conduct an assessment of child care programs in Santa Monica. The study was motivated in part by the perception of some stakeholders that the system of care had become fragmented and complex. Additional motivations were the uncertainty of resource streams stemming from recent and anticipated state and federal budget cuts and a desire to ensure youth well-being in the community. The project sought to assess how well Santa Monica{u2019}s child care programs meet the needs of families, including child care and early education programs serving children from birth to kindergarten entry, as well as care for school-aged children (focusing on kindergarten through eighth grade) in the hours before and after school and in the summer. Overall, recommendations for improvement focused on advancing access, quality, service delivery, and financial sustainability
Preparing principals to raise student achievement : implementation and effects of the New Leaders program in ten districts by Susan M Gates( )

8 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,078 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research methods -- Overview of the new leaders program and district partnership approach -- New leaders partnerships -- Analysis of impacts on student achievement -- Factors Associated with new leaders program effects -- Conclusion
Supporting employers in the reserve operational forces era : are changes needed to reservists' employment rights legislation, policies, or programs? by Susan M Gates( )

6 editions published between 2006 and 2013 in English and held by 664 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), a U.S. Department of Defense office (DoD), asked the RAND Corporation to study the implications that using the Reserve Components (RCs) as an operational force can have for employers in view of employment rights protections for RC members. Specifically, ESGR wanted to know whether changes are needed to the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), 1994 legislation designed to prevent hiring discrimination and bolster job protection for members of the armed forces, including those of the RCs; ESGR support programs; or RC activation and deployment policies, given the increased mobilization of the National Guard and Reserve and the continuing need to balance the rights, duties, and obligations of employers, RC members, and RC members' families. The study involved the review and analysis of existing research and data related to USERRA and the effects on employers of employee absences more generally, an analysis of the 2011 DoD National Survey of Employers, focus groups with employers conducted in 2012, interviews with RC chiefs conducted in 2011, and a legal and legislative history review of USERRA. This report describes key findings from the analysis."--Page 4 of cover
Supporting employers in the reserve operational forces era : appendixes by Susan M Gates( )

4 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 545 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), a U.S. Department of Defense office (DoD), asked the RAND Corporation to study the implications that using the Reserve Components (RCs) as an operational force can have for employers in view of employment rights protections for RC members. Specifically, ESGR wanted to know whether changes are needed to the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), 1994 legislation designed to prevent hiring discrimination and bolster job protection for members of the armed forces, including those of the RCs; ESGR support programs; or RC activation and deployment policies, given the increased mobilization of the National Guard and Reserve and the continuing need to balance the rights, duties, and obligations of employers, RC members, and RC members⁰́₉ families. The study involved the review and analysis of existing research and data related to USERRA and the effects on employers of employee absences more generally, an analysis of the 2011 DoD National Survey of Employers, focus groups with employers conducted in 2012, interviews with RC chiefs conducted in 2011, and a legal and legislative history review of USERRA. This report describes key findings from the analysis
Laying the foundation for successful school leadership by Susan Burkhauser( )

5 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 544 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Principals can influence student achievement in a number of ways⁰́₄monitoring instruction; evaluating teachers; hiring, developing, and retaining school staff; maintaining student discipline; managing the school budget; establishing a school culture; and engaging with the community. While principals⁰́₉ skills in these areas are important, skills alone are not enough to ensure that they will be effective school leaders. This is because school and district contexts⁰́₄which include school and district characteristics, practices, and policies⁰́₄set the stage for principals⁰́₉ performance and strongly influence their effectiveness. In this report, RAND researchers provide guidance to state and district decisionmakers and others who manage school systems, focusing on four areas that research has identified as particularly influential in supporting principal effectiveness: placement in the school, evaluation, autonomy, and resources. We highlight how actions in these areas can create conditions in the school and district that foster principal success
Addressing challenges in evaluating school principal improvement efforts by Susan Burkhauser( )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 445 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Given the focus on accountability in education, stakeholders are interested in evaluating whether efforts aimed at improving school leadership show results; the key criteria are student outcomes. This report describes challenges that states, districts, and other entities can expect to encounter as they evaluate efforts targeting school leadership as a way to improve student outcomes and offers suggestions for dealing with those challenges
Early and school-age care in Santa Monica : current system, policy options, and recommendations by Ashley Pierson( )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Living longer in Mexico : income security and health by Emma Aguila( )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This analysis of aging and income security in Mexico establishes that the older population in Mexico is increasing quickly and that this population is especially vulnerable to poverty. Mexican citizens are living longer and overall have experienced an improvement in the quality of life compared to that of prior generations. However, this study demonstrates that social improvements are not affecting the daily lives of all persons equally. The authors attempt to uncover and highlight those differences. One of the primary challenges facing Mexico is a growing older population. The demographic transition in Mexico combined with the lack of formal sources of income in retirement place many older persons in a state of financial insecurity. The information contained in this monograph and the proposed policy research areas are intended to enlarge the portfolio of options for older Mexicans. The authors analyze wealth and sources of income during retirement, the relationship between health and wealth, urban and rural disparities, and the impact of migration spells to the United States on wealth accumulation and health insurance in Mexico
Earning college credits in high school : options, participation, and outcomes for Oregon students by Ashley Pierson( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oregon's postsecondary attainment goal for 2025, adopted in 2011, calls for 40 percent of Oregon adults to have a bachelor's degree or higher, 40 percent to have an associate's degree or postsecondary certificate, and the remaining 20 percent to have a high school diploma or equivalent (S. 253, Or. 2011). As in other states a central strategy for increasing postsecondary attainment in Oregon is to promote accelerated college credit options--such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual credit, and dual enrollment courses--that enable high school students to earn college credit. Oregon has invested heavily in the accelerated college credit strategy, with particular attention to student groups that have historically not had access to these courses. The study focuses on options offered between 2005/06 and 2012/13 through Oregon community colleges, including dual credit (in which high school students earn both high school and college credit by taking a college course at their high school) and dual enrollment (in which high school students earn both high school and college credit by taking a college course at the college campus or online), and on the characteristics of the students who enroll in these classes. The study also explores the relationship between students' participation in dual credit and later education outcomes, including high school graduation, postsecondary enrollment, and postsecondary persistence. Key findings include the following: (1) Oregon public colleges have many accelerated college credit options, but their cost, eligibility requirements, and geographic coverage vary greatly across institutions; (2) Oregon's rate of community college dual credit participation is higher than the national average; (3) Oregon students taking dual credit courses through a community college enroll and earn credit in an average of three dual credit courses during their time in high school; (4) More than 90 percent of students pass the community college dual credit courses in which they have enrolled; (5) Community college dual credit students are more likely to be White, female, high achievers, and not eligible for the federal school lunch program; (6) Male students in all racial/ethnic groups participate in community college dual credit at lower rates than female students do, and in each racial/ethnic group the gender gap in participation is similar; (7) In each racial/ethnic group students eligible for the federal school lunch program participate in community college dual credit at lower rates than students who are not eligible; (8) The rates at which students who participate in dual credit programs graduate from high school, enroll in college, and persist in the first year of college are higher than the state average; and (9) At the five community colleges examined in a dual enrollment analysis, participation in dual enrollment was low but grew over time. Dual enrollment students had lower achievement on state math and reading tests and higher rates of eligibility for the federal school lunch program than dual credit students had. Oregon stakeholders can use the study results to better understand the breadth and characteristics of accelerated college credit options in the state; dual credit programs' equity gaps--which can inform outreach efforts to students participating at lower rates, such as rural, economically disadvantaged, and racial/ethnic minority students; and data that should be reported to the state to conduct analyses that improve monitoring and evaluation of accelerated college credit programs. Nationally, this study offers an example to other states of potentially useful analyses to inform improvements to these programs. The following are appended: (1) Literature review; (2) Data and methods; (3) Detailed accelerated college credit program information; (4) Detailed results; and (5) Dual credit courses by subject
Alaska Students' Pathways from High School to Postsecondary Education and Employment. REL 2016-114 by Havala Hanson( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Approximately 10,000 students leave Alaska high schools each year, with or without a diploma. In pursuit of their career and life goals, they chart courses across college enrollment, employment, and other opportunities. Until recently, policymakers and educators had little information about the pathways students took into their early careers. To obtain this information, Regional Educational Laboratory Northwest examined data through 2012 from multiple national and state education and labor sources to discern the pathways of 40,000 students who left public high schools in Alaska from 2004/05 to 2007/08. Of this sample 67 percent of students graduated from high school and 33 percent did not. The study also followed Alaska students who graduated in 2004/05 and 2005/06 in their first six years after high school to describe the pathways they took to their early careers. The following are among the key findings, which are presented in this report: (1) Most Alaska students either enrolled in college or started working in the state right after high school; (2) Students followed more than 3,000 unique postsecondary pathways, which often included attending college, working in Alaska, or both; and (3) Students who earned a college degree tended to have higher rates of early-career employment and higher wages than students who did not earn a degree. The following are appended: (1) Data sources and methods; and (2) Detailed results
Comparing Postsecondary Enrollment and Persistence among Rural and Nonrural Students in Oregon. REL 2015-076 by Ashley Pierson( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This REL Northwest study examined whether rural students at all achievement levels were less likely than their nonrural counterparts to enroll in college and persist to the second year. The researchers analyzed college enrollment patterns and persistence among rural and nonrural Oregon high school students, as well as variations among different types of students. The study found that rural students were less likely than nonrural students to enroll in college at any time after high school. In addition, rural and nonrural students were equally likely to enroll in college immediately after high school. Finally, rural students were less likely to persist into their second year of college than nonrural students. Appended are: (1) Previous research on factors that influence college enrollment and persistence; (2) Data and methodology; (3) Detailed results; and (4) List of Oregon higher education institutions not in the National Student Clearinghouse
Regional promise grants (2014-2015) : final evaluation report by Ashley Pierson( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Alaska students' pathways from high school to postsecondary education and employment by Havala Hanson( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Languages
English (57)