WorldCat Identities

Newsome, Philip N.

Overview
Works: 16 works in 38 publications in 1 language and 847 library holdings
Roles: Editor, Other, Author, Contributor
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Philip N Newsome
Liver transplantation : clinical assessment and management by James Neuberger( )

21 editions published between 2013 and 2021 in English and held by 813 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Welcome to the second edition of Liver Transplantation. Since the first edition, there have been many changes in the management of patients with liver disease, both before and after transplantation and this new edition reflects this. As with the first edition, the aim of the volume is to provide a concise, practical and authoritative guide for junior medical staff and other health professionals working in liver transplant units, for health care professionals looking after those patients with liver disease who are or may become liver transplant candidates and those following liver transplantation. We have expanded both the number and reach of authors, with consequent increase in chapters. We have sought to represent the breadth of liver transplant medicine across Europe and North America, while recognizing also the role of liver transplantation in the rest of the world. We appreciate that this means some duplication and occasional divergence of views. We have intentionally retained these so that each chapter is entire of itself and the reader understands where there is uncertainty. We are very grateful to the authors who have written and revised their contributions during the height of the Covid pandemic. We are grateful to those at Wiley Blackwell, especially Jennifer Seward and Pri Gibbons, for the help and patience and, most importantly to our partners and children who have been patient with us during the preparation of this second edition"--
The road to success : Macau Grand Prix by Philip N Newsome( )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Care of patients with liver disease during the COVID-19 pandemic EASL-ESCMID position paper by Tobias Böttler( )

2 editions published in 2020 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses an enormous challenge to healthcare systems in affected communities. Older patients and those with pre-existing medical conditions have been identified as populations at risk of a severe disease course. It remains unclear at this point to what extent chronic liver diseases should be considered as risk factors, due to a shortage of appropriate studies. However, patients with advanced liver disease and those after liver transplantation represent vulnerable patient cohorts with an increased risk of infection and/or a severe course of COVID-19. In addition, the current pandemic requires unusual allocation of healthcare resources which may negatively impact the care of patients with chronic liver disease that continue to require medical attention. Thus, the challenge hepatologists are facing is to promote telemedicine in the outpatient setting, prioritise outpatient contacts, avoid nosocomial dissemination of the virus to patients and healthcare providers, and at the same time maintain standard care for patients who require immediate medical attention
Impact of COVID-19 on the care of patients with liver disease: EASL-ESCMID position paper after 6 months of the pandemic by Tobias Böttler( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: During the early stages of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, EASL and ESCMID published a position paper to provide guidance for physicians involved in the care of patients with chronic liver disease. While some healthcare systems are returning to a more normal routine, many countries and healthcare systems have been, or still are, overwhelmed by the pandemic, which is significantly impacting on the care of these patients. In addition, many studies have been published focusing on how COVID-19 may affect the liver and how pre-existing liver diseases might influence the clinical course of COVID-19. While many aspects remain poorly understood, it has become increasingly evident that pre-existing liver diseases and liver injury during the disease course must be kept in mind when caring for patients with COVID-19. This review should serve as an update on the previous position paper, summarising the evidence for liver disease involvement during COVID-19 and providing recommendations on how to return to routine care wherever possible
Development of an invasively monitored porcine model of acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure by Philip N Newsome( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fat and Fibrosis: Does Empagliflozin Impair the Progression of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus? by Reenam S Khan( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cytokine treatment optimises the immunotherapeutic effects of umbilical cord-derived MSC for treatment of inflammatory liver disease by Samantha F. H De Witte( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Clinical effectiveness of cell therapies in patients with chronic liver disease and acute-on-chronic liver failure: a systematic review protocol by Nwe Ni Than( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and liver regeneration: believe the hypoxia! by Abhilok Garg( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

3D human liver tissue from pluripotent stem cells displays stable phenotype in vitro and supports compromised liver function in vivo by Hassan Rashidi( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Association Between Fibrosis Stage and Outcomes of Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta -Analysis by Rod Taylor( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Development of an invasively monitored porcine model of acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure by Philip N Newsome( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Background The development of effective therapies for acute liver failure (ALF) is limited by our knowledge of the pathophysiology of this condition, and the lack of suitable large animal models of acetaminophen toxicity. Our aim was to develop a reproducible invasively-monitored porcine model of acetaminophen-induced ALF. Method 35kg pigs were maintained under general anaesthesia and invasively monitored. Control pigs received a saline infusion, whereas ALF pigs received acetaminophen intravenously for 12 hours to maintain blood concentrations between 200-300 mg/l. Animals surviving 28 hours were euthanased. Results Cytochrome p450 levels in phenobarbital pre-treated animals were significantly higher than non pre-treated animals (300 vs 100 pmol/mg protein). Control pigs (n = 4) survived 28-hour anaesthesia without incident. Of nine pigs that received acetaminophen, four survived 20 hours and two survived 28 hours. Injured animals developed hypotension (mean arterial pressure; 40.8 +/- 5.9 vs 59 +/- 2.0 mmHg), increased cardiac output (7.26 +/- 1.86 vs 3.30 +/- 0.40 l/min) and decreased systemic vascular resistance (8.48 +/- 2.75 vs 16.2 +/- 1.76 mPa/s/m3). Dyspnoea developed as liver injury progressed and the increased pulmonary vascular resistance (636 +/- 95 vs 301 +/- 26.9 mPa/s/m3) observed may reflect the development of respiratory distress syndrome. Liver damage was confirmed by deterioration in pH (7.23 +/- 0.05 vs 7.45 +/- 0.02) and prothrombin time (36 +/- 2 vs 8.9 +/- 0.3 seconds) compared with controls. Factor V and VII levels were reduced to 9.3 and 15.5% of starting values in injured animals. A marked increase in serum AST (471.5 +/- 210 vs 42 +/- 8.14) coincided with a marked reduction in serum albumin (11.5 +/- 1.71 vs 25 +/- 1 g/dL) in injured animals. Animals displayed evidence of renal impairment; mean creatinine levels 280.2 +/- 36.5 vs 131.6 +/- 9.33 μmol/l. Liver histology revealed evidence of severe centrilobular necrosis with coagul
Liraglutide safety and efficacy in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (LEAN): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 study( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues reduce hepatic steatosis, concentrations of liver enzymes, and insulin resistance in murine models of fatty liver disease. These analogues are licensed for type 2 diabetes, but their efficacy in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is unknown. We assessed the safety and efficacy of the long-acting GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide, in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Methods: This multicentre, double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial was conducted in four UK medical centres to assess subcutaneous injections of liraglutide (1·8 mg daily) compared with placebo for patients who are overweight and show clinical evidence of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) using a computer-generated, centrally administered procedure, stratified by trial centre and diabetes status. The trial was designed using A'Hern's single-group method, which required eight (38%) of 21 successes in the liraglutide group for the effect of liraglutide to be considered clinically significant. Patients, investigators, clinical trial site staff, and pathologists were masked to treatment assignment throughout the study. The primary outcome measure was resolution of definite non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with no worsening in fibrosis from baseline to end of treatment (48 weeks), as assessed centrally by two independent pathologists. Analysis was done by intention-to-treat analysis, which included all patients who underwent end-of-treatment biopsy. The trial was registered withClinicalTrials.gov, numberNCT01237119 . Findings: Between Aug 1, 2010, and May 31, 2013, 26 patients were randomly assigned to receive liraglutide and 26 to placebo. Nine (39%) of 23 patients who received liraglutide and underwent end-of-treatment liver biopsy had resolution of definite non-alcoholic steatohepatitis compared with two (9%) of 22 such patients in the placebo group (relative risk 4·3 [95% CI 1·0-17·7]; p=0·019). Two (9%) of 23 patients in the liraglutide group versus eight (36%) of 22 patients in the placebo group had progression of fibrosis (0·2 [0·1-1·0]; p=0·04). Most adverse events were grade 1 (mild) to grade 2 (moderate) in severity, transient, and similar in the two treatment groups for all organ classes and symptoms, with the exception of gastrointestinal disorders in 21 (81%) of 23 patients in the liraglutide group and 17 (65%) of 22 patients in the placebo group, which included diarrhoea (ten [38%] patients in the liraglutide group vs five [19%] in the placebo group), constipation (seven [27%] vs none), and loss of appetite (eight [31%] vs two [8%]). Interpretation: Liraglutide was safe, well tolerated, and led to histological resolution of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, warranting extensive, longer-term studies. Funding: Wellcome Trust, National Institute of Health Research, and Novo Nordisk
Immunomodulation By Therapeutic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) Is Triggered Through Phagocytosis of MSC By Monocytic Cells( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Liraglutide for patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis - Authors' reply( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Trials of obeticholic acid for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  General Special  
Audience level: 0.32 (from 0.30 for Care of pa ... to 0.99 for Developmen ...)

Liver transplantation : clinical assessment and management
Covers
Alternative Names
Philip Newsome onderzoeker

Philip Newsome researcher

Филипп Ньюсом

Languages
English (38)