WorldCat Identities

Asamura, H.

Overview
Works: 37 works in 60 publications in 5 languages and 697 library holdings
Genres: Scientific atlases  Classification  Atlases  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Editor, Publishing director, Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by H Asamura
TNM-Atlas : illustrierter Leitfaden zur TNM/pTNM-Klassifikation maligner Tumoren by Bernd Spiessl( )

10 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and German and held by 547 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book presents the illustrated version of the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, Seventh Edition, promoting the uniform application of the TNM classification in cancer practice. Now featuring beautiful, useful full-color medical artwork, this book is designed as an aid for the practical application of the TNM classification system by illustrating the T and N categories in clear, easily understood graphics. The aim of this presentation is twofold: to reach a more standardized understanding and documentation of the anatomic spread of tumours, and to further enhance the dissem
TNM atlas : illustrated guide to the TNM/pTNM classification of malignant tumours by Bernd Spiessl( Book )

12 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book presents the illustrated version of the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, Seventh Edition, promoting the uniform application of the TNM classification in cancer practice. Now featuring beautiful, useful full-color medical artwork, this book is designed as an aid for the practical application of the TNM classification system by illustrating the T and N categories in clear, easily understood graphics. The aim of this presentation is twofold: to reach a more standardized understanding and documentation of the anatomic spread of tumours, and to further enhance the dissem
TNM atlas : guide illustré de la classification TNM des tumeurs malignes by International Union against Cancer( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in French and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Le TNM (T pour tumeurs, N pour l'anglais nodes, ganglions lymphatiques, M pour métastases) a été créé par le français Pierre Denoix. C'est le système le plus utilisé pour la classification par stades cliniques de l'extension des cancers. Il a pour fonction de permettre à toutes les disciplines de disposer d'un moyen de description de l'extension des tumeurs et de communication standardisé. Cette sixième édition de l'Atlas TNM est fondée sur la 7e édition de la classification TNM (publiée par Cassini en 2010). Elle comporte plus de 500 dessins anatomiques en couleur. [Ed.]
TNM-Atlas : ein illustrierter Leitfaden zur TNM/pTnm-Klassifikation maligner Tumoren by Ch Wittekind( )

2 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in German and English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

TNM klasyfikacja nowotworów złośliwych( Book )

3 editions published in 2017 in Polish and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Asamura kokyūki geka shujutsu by H Asamura( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in Japanese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Background Data and Proposals for the Classification of Lung Cancer with Separate Tumor Nodules in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification for Lung Cancer( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT : Introduction: : Separate tumor nodules with the same histologic appearance occur in the lungs in a small proportion of patients with primary lung cancer. This article addresses how such tumors can be classified to inform the eighth edition of the anatomic classification of lung cancer. Separate tumor nodules should be distinguished from second primary lung cancer, multifocal ground glass/lepidic tumors, and pneumonic‐type lung cancer, which are addressed in separate analyses. Methods: : Survival of patients with separate tumor nodules in the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer database were analyzed. This was compared with a systematic literature review. Results: : Survival of clinically staged patients decreased according to the location of the separate tumor nodule relative to the index tumor (same lobe > same side > other side) in N0 and N‐any cohorts (all M0 except possible other‐side nodules). However, there was also a decrease in the proportion of patients resected; among only surgically resected or among nonresected patients no survival differences were noted. There were no survival differences between patients with same‐lobe nodules and those with other T3 tumors, between patients with same‐side nodules and those with T4 tumors, and patients with other‐side nodules and those with other M1a tumors. The data correlated with those identified in a literature review. Conclusions: : Tumors with same‐lobe separate tumor nodules (with the same histologic appearance) are recommended to be classified as T3, same‐side nodules as T4, and other‐side nodules as M1a. Thus, there is no recommended change between the seventh and eighth edition of the TNM classification of lung cancer
Hippo Pathway Gene Mutations in Malignant Mesothelioma( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Introduction: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive neoplasm causatively associated with exposure to asbestos. MM is rarely responsive to conventional cytotoxic drugs, and the outcome remains dismal. It is, therefore, necessary to identify the signaling pathways that drive MM and to develop new therapeutics specifically targeting the molecules involved. Methods: We performed comprehensive RNA sequencing of 12 MM cell lines and four clinical samples using so-called next-generation sequencers. Results: We found 15 novel fusion transcripts including one derived from chromosomal translocation between the large tumor suppressor 1 ( LATS1 ) and presenilin-1 ( PSEN1 ) genes. LATS1 is one of the central players of the emerging Hippo signaling pathway. The LATS1 – PSEN1 fusion gene product lacked the ability to phosphorylate yes-associated protein and to suppress the growth of a MM cell line. The wild-type LATS1 allele was undetectable in this cell line, indicating two-hit genetic inactivation of its tumor suppressor function. Using pathway-targeted exon sequencing, we further identified a total of 11 somatic mutations in four Hippo pathway genes (neurofibromatosis type 2 [ NF2 ], LATS2, RASSF1, and SAV1 ) in 35% (8 of 23) of clinical samples. Nuclear staining of yes-associated protein was detected in 55% (24 of 44) of the clinical samples. Expression and/or phosphorylation of the Hippo signaling proteins, RASSF1, Merlin (NF2), LATS1, and LATS2, was frequently absent. Conclusions: The frequent alterations of Hippo pathway molecules found in this study indicate the therapeutic feasibility of targeting this pathway in patients with MM
ESTS textbook of thoracic surgery( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ESTS textbook of thoracic surgery( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

TNM atlas : illustrated guide to the TNM classification of malignant tumours by Ch Wittekind( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Haigan ga wakaru hon : kensa chiryō kanwa kea etosetora kanjasan to gokazoku ni shitte oite hoshii koto senmon'i ga kaisetsu suru( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Summary of Proposals for Revisions of the Classification of Lung Cancers with Multiple Pulmonary Sites of Involvement in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT : Introduction: : Patients with lung cancer who harbor multiple pulmonary sites of disease have been challenging to classify; a subcommittee of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee was charged with developing proposals for the eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) classification to address this issue. Methods: : A systematic literature review and analysis of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer database was performed to develop proposals for revision in an iterative process involving multispecialty international input and review. Results: : Details of the evidence base are summarized in other articles. Four patterns of disease are recognized; the clinical presentation, pathologic correlates, and biologic behavior of these suggest specific applications of the TNM classification rules. First, it is proposed that second primary lung cancers be designated with a T, N, and M category for each tumor. Second, tumors with a separate tumor nodule of the same histologic type (either suspected or proved) should be classified according to the location of the separate nodule relative to the index tumor—T3 for a same‐lobe, T4 for a same‐side (different lobe), and M1a for an other‐side location—with a single N and M category. Third, multiple tumors with prominent ground glass (imaging) or lepidic (histologic) features should be designated by the T category of the highest T lesion, the number or m in parentheses (#/m) to indicate the multiplicity, and a collective N and M category for all. Finally, it is proposed that diffuse pneumonic‐type lung cancers be designated by size (or T3) if in one lobe, T4 if involving multiple same‐side lobes, and M1a if involving both lungs with a single N and M category for all areas of involvement. Conclusion: : We propose to tailor TNM classification of multiple pulmonary sites of lung cancer to reflect the unique aspects of four different patterns of presentation. We hope that this will lead to more consistent classification and clarity in communication and facilitate further research in the nature and optimal treatment of these entities
Staging, Tumor Profile, and Prognostic Groups in Lung Cancer or the New Tower of Babel( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Determination of poor prognostic immune features of tumour microenvironment in non-smoking patients with lung adenocarcinoma( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Staging Project( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Introduction: Nodal status is considered to be one of the most reliable indicators of the prognosis in patients with lung cancer and thus is indispensable in determining the optimal therapeutic options. We sought to determine whether the current nodal (N) descriptors should be maintained or revised for the next edition (8th) of the International Lung Cancer Staging System. Methods: The new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer lung cancer database was created from 94, 708 patients diagnosed as having lung cancer between 1999 and 2010. Among these, 38, 910 and 31, 426 patients with non–small-cell lung carcinoma were available for an analysis of the clinical (c)N and pathological (p)N status, respectively. The anatomical location of lymph node involvement was defined by either the Naruke (for Japanese data) or American Thoracic Society (for non-Japanese data) nodal charts. Survival was calculated by the Kaplan–Meier method, and prognostic groups were assessed by a Cox regression analysis. Results: The current N0 to N3 descriptors for both the cN and pN status consistently separated prognostically distinct groups. The 5-year survival rates according to the cN and pN status were 60% and 75% (N0), 37% and 49% (N1), 23% and 36% (N2), and 9% and 20% (N3), respectively. The differences in survival between all neighboring nodal categories were highly significant for both the cN and pN status. With regard to pathological staging, additional analyses regarding the prognosis were performed by further dividing N1 into N1 at a single station (N1a) and N1 at multiple stations (N1b); N2 into N2 at a single station without N1 involvement ("skip" metastasis, N2a1), N2 at a single station with N1 involvement (N2a2), and N2 at multiple stations (N2b). The survival curves for N1b and N2a2 overlapped each other, and N2a1 had numerically a better prognosis than N1b, although the difference was not significant. Geographic difference in N-specific prognosis was observed for both c-settings and p-settings. This might have been because of the difference in the used nodal map, surgical technique, and pathologist's handling of the resected specimen. Conclusions: Current N descriptors adequately predict the prognosis and therefore should be maintained in the forthcoming staging system. Furthermore, we recommend that physicians record the number of metastatic lymph nodes (or stations) and to further classify the N category using new descriptors, such as N1a, N1b, N2a, N2b, and N3, for further testing
Brief Reports - Frequent BRAF or EGFR Mutations in Ciliated Muconodular Papillary Tumors of the Lung( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT: : Introduction: : Ciliated muconodular papillary tumors (CMPTs) are recently characterized, rare peripheral nodules of the lung. These small tumors are histologically comprised of a vaguely organized mixture of nonatypical ciliated columnar cells, mucous cells, and basal cells, and consistently follow a benign clinical course. However, the histogenesis of CMPTs remains uncertain. Methods: : We performed detailed genomic analyses of 10 archived CMPT cases, using next‐generation sequencing and high‐resolution melting analysis. Results: : Mutations were identified in eight of the 10 cases (80%); four cases harbored the BRAF ‐V600E mutation, one case harbored the BRAF ‐G606R mutation, and three cases harbored deletions in exon 19 of EGFR . All of the deletions in EGFR were of the E746‐T751/S752V subtype. Conclusions: : The high prevalence of driver gene mutations in CMPTs supports the notion that these lesions are neoplastic rather than reactive or metaplastic
Surgical Management of Recurrent Thymic Epithelial Tumors( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: There is no standard treatment for recurrent thymic epithelial tumors. Although the efficacy has not been validated based on the large series studies, surgical resection is sometimes employed for patients with recurrent thymic tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the surgical outcomes for recurrent thymic epithelial tumors based on the Japanese nationwide database. Methods: From the database of patients whose thymic epithelial tumors were treated surgically from 1991 through 2010, the cohort who developed recurrence after the initial resection was extracted. Clinicopathological factors were reviewed, and the prognostic factors of re-resected cases were examined. Results: Twenty-eight hundred thirty-five patients who underwent surgical resection of thymic epithelial tumors were registered to the database. Among these patients, 420 (14.8%) experienced recurrence. One hundred sixty-two patients were treated surgically and 243 were treated nonsurgically for recurrent disease. The 5- and 10-year postrecurrence survival rates were 82.7% and 68.2%, respectively, in the surgery group and 43.5% and 25.4%, respectively, in the nonsurgery group ( p < 0.001). According to univariate analyses, female sex and the pathological Masaoka I-II stage, nonthymic carcinoma, absence of preoperative treatment and longer recurrent-free interval (RFI) were significantly favorable factors for survival in the surgery group. According to the multivariate analysis, nonthymic carcinoma histology and longer RFI were identified to be independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: The surgical outcomes of recurrent thymic epithelial tumors are favorable in selected patients. The role of re-resection may be limited in the setting of thymic carcinoma and/or a short RFI
Lobe‐Specific Nodal Dissection for Clinical Stage I and II NSCLC: Japanese Multi‐Institutional Retrospective Study Using a Propensity Score Analysis( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT : Objectives: : The purpose of this study was to assess the surgical outcomes according to the extent of mediastinal lymph node dissection for patients with NSCLC by using a nationwide registry database. Methods: : From among 11, 663 patients in a Japanese lung cancer registry study for 2004, 5392 patients with clinical stage (c‐stage) I or II NSCLC that was completely resected by lobectomy and either systematic (SND) or lobe‐specific nodal dissection (LSD) were enrolled. Patients who received preoperative therapy or had middle lobe tumor were excluded. In the LSD group, inferior mediastinal (subcarinal) nodes were not dissected for upper lobe tumors, and superior mediastinal nodes were not dissected for lower lobe tumors. To reduce the selection bias, an inverse probability of treatment weighting method using a propensity score was implemented. Results: : LSD and SND were performed in 1268 patients (23.5%) and 4124 patients (76.5%), respectively. The LSD group included more upper lobe and c‐stage I tumors and less pathological N2 disease than the SND group. Extended pathological N2 disease outside LSD area was found in 3.2% of the SND group. The 5‐year overall survival was 81.5% in the LSD group and 75.9% in the SND group. An inverse probability of treatment weighting–adjusted Cox model showed that LSD did not have a negative prognostic impact and instead was associated with favorable survival (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.60−0.77). Conclusions: : This retrospective registry study suggested that LSD is an alternative to SND for selected patients with c‐stage I or II NSCLC. Future prospective studies are warranted to determine whether LSD is applicable and provides clinical benefit for the general population of patients with c‐stage I or II NSCLC
 
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Audience level: 0.43 (from 0.35 for TNM-Atlas ... to 0.99 for Haigan ga ...)

Alternative Names
Asamura, H.

Hisao Asamura.

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