WorldCat Identities

Gray, Kurt James

Overview
Works: 13 works in 27 publications in 2 languages and 680 library holdings
Genres: Aerial views  Maps 
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: BF121, 150
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Kurt James Gray
The mind club : who thinks, what feels, and why it matters by Daniel M Wegner( Book )

9 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 551 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"From dogs to gods, the science of understanding mysterious minds--including your own. Nothing seems more real than the minds of other people. When you consider what your boss is thinking or whether your spouse is happy, you are admitting them into the "mind club." It's easy to assume other humans can think and feel, but what about a cow, a computer, a corporation? What kinds of mind do they have? Daniel M. Wegner and Kurt Gray are award-winning psychologists who have discovered that minds--while incredibly important--are a matter of perception. Their research opens a trove of new findings, with insights into human behavior that are fascinating, frightening and funny. The Mind Club explains why we love some animals and eat others, why people debate the existence of God so intensely, how good people can be so cruel, and why robots make such poor lovers. By investigating the mind perception of extraordinary targets--animals, machines, comatose people, god--Wegner and Gray explain what it means to have a mind, and why it matters so much. Fusing cutting-edge research and personal anecdotes, The Mind Club explores the moral dimensions of mind perception with wit and compassion, revealing the surprisingly simple basis for what compels us to love and hate, to harm and to protect"--
Atlas of moral psychology by Kurt James Gray( Book )

5 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 101 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This comprehensive and cutting-edge volume maps out the terrain of moral psychology, a dynamic and evolving area of research. In 57 concise chapters, leading authorities and up-and-coming scholars explore fundamental issues and current controversies. The volume systematically reviews the empirical evidence base and presents influential theories of moral judgment and behavior. It is organized around the key questions that must be addressed for a complete understanding of the moral mind"--
Disgust and religious morality of mind by Ryan Ritter( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The mind club : who thinks, what feels, and why it matters by Daniel M Wegner( Recording )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"From dogs to gods, the science of understanding mysterious minds--including your own. Nothing seems more real than the minds of other people. When you consider what your boss is thinking or whether your spouse is happy, you are admitting them into the "mind club." It's easy to assume other humans can think and feel, but what about a cow, a computer, a corporation? What kinds of mind do they have? Daniel M. Wegner and Kurt Gray are award-winning psychologists who have discovered that minds--while incredibly important--are a matter of perception. Their research opens a trove of new findings, with insights into human behavior that are fascinating, frightening and funny. The Mind Club explains why we love some animals and eat others, why people debate the existence of God so intensely, how good people can be so cruel, and why robots make such poor lovers. By investigating the mind perception of extraordinary targets--animals, machines, comatose people, god--Wegner and Gray explain what it means to have a mind, and why it matters so much. Fusing cutting-edge research and personal anecdotes, The Mind Club explores the moral dimensions of mind perception with wit and compassion, revealing the surprisingly simple basis for what compels us to love and hate, to harm and to protect"--
Cruel shocks and kind massages : pain, pleasure and perceived intention by Kurt James Gray( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Experiment 3 found that the specific valence of intention matters in pain experience. Maliciously intentioned shocks hurt more, while benevolently intended shocks hurt less than unintentional shocks. These studies suggest perceived intention influences the experience of pain. Of course, pain is complemented by pleasure and it may be that intention can also influence the experience of pleasure. Experiment 4 tested whether a massage from an electric chair pad felt better when intentionally chosen by a person than when unintentionally selected by a computer. As predicted, the identical massage was rated as more pleasurable when perceived to be intentional. It appears that, whether in the domain of pain or pleasure, our conscious experience hinges on the interpersonal context of stimuli. This effect is explained both in terms of meaning and the power of the moral dyad to constrain experience
Sin gwa gae wa ingan ui maeum( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in Korean and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Emergence of "Us and Them" in 80 Lines of Code( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Psychological explanations of group genesis often require population heterogeneity in identity or other characteristics, whether deep (e.g., religion) or superficial (e.g., eye color). We used agent-based models to explore group genesis in homogeneous populations and found robust group formation with just two basic principles: reciprocity and transitivity. These emergent groups demonstrated in-group cooperation and out-group defection, even though agents lacked common identity. Group formation increased individual payoffs, and group number and size were robust to varying levels of reciprocity and transitivity. Increasing population size increased group size more than group number, and manipulating baseline trust in a population had predictable effects on group genesis. An interactive demonstration of the parameter space and source code for implementing the model are available online
The Visual Guide to Morality: Vision as an Integrative Analogy for Moral Experience, Variability and Mechanism( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Analogies help organize, communicate and reveal scientific phenomena. Vision may be the best analogy for understanding moral judgment. Although moral psychology has long noted similarities between seeing and judging, we systematically review the "morality is like vision" analogy through three elements: experience, variability and mechanism. Both vision and morality are experienced as automatic, durable and objective. However, despite feelings of objectivity, both vision and morality show substantial variability across biology, culture and situation. The paradox of objective experience and cultural subjectivity is best understood through constructionism, as both vision and morality involve the flexible combination of more basic ingredients. Specifically, both vision and morality involve a mechanism that demonstrates Gestalt, combination and coherence. The "morality is like vision" analogy not only provides intuitive organization and compelling communication for moral psychology but also speaks to debates in the field, such as intuition versus reason, pluralism versus universalism and modularity versus constructionism
To Be Immortal, Do Good or Evil( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Many people believe in immortality, but who is perceived to live on and how exactly do they live on? Seven studies reveal that good- and evil-doers are perceived to possess more immortality—albeit different kinds. Good-doers have “transcendent” immortality, with their souls persisting beyond space and time; evil-doers have “trapped” immortality, with their souls persisting on Earth, bound to a physical location. Studies 1 to 4 reveal bidirectional links between perceptions of morality and type of immortality. Studies 5 to 7 reveal how these links explain paranormal perceptions. People generally tie paranormal events to evil spirits (Study 5), but this depends upon location: Evil spirits are perceived to haunt houses and dense forests, whereas good spirits are perceived in expansive locations such as mountaintops (Study 6). However, even good spirits may be seen as trapped on Earth given extenuating circumstances (Study 7). Materials include a scale for measuring trapped and transcendent immorality
Mind club - who thinks, what feels, and why it matters by Kurt James Gray( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

How to Map Theory: Reliable Methods Are Fruitless Without Rigorous Theory( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Good science requires both reliable methods and rigorous theory. Theory allows us to build a unified structure of knowledge, to connect the dots of individual studies and reveal the bigger picture. Some have criticized the proliferation of pet “Theories,” but generic “theory” is essential to healthy science, because questions of theory are ultimately those of validity. Although reliable methods and rigorous theory are synergistic, Action Identification suggests psychological tension between them: The more we focus on methodological details, the less we notice the broader connections. Therefore, psychology needs to supplement training in methods (how to design studies and analyze data) with training in theory (how to connect studies and synthesize ideas). This article provides a technique for visually outlining theory: theory mapping. Theory mapping contains five elements, which are illustrated with moral judgment and with cars. Also included are 15 additional theory maps provided by experts in emotion, culture, priming, power, stress, ideology, morality, marketing, decision-making, and more (see all at theorymaps.org). Theory mapping provides both precision and synthesis, which helps to resolve arguments, prevent redundancies, assess the theoretical contribution of papers, and evaluate the likelihood of surprising effects
Dying Is Unexpectedly Positive( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In people’s imagination, dying seems dreadful; however, these perceptions may not reflect reality. In two studies, we compared the affective experience of people facing imminent death with that of people imagining imminent death. Study 1 revealed that blog posts of near-death patients with cancer and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were more positive and less negative than the simulated blog posts of nonpatients—and also that the patients’ blog posts became more positive as death neared. Study 2 revealed that the last words of death-row inmates were more positive and less negative than the simulated last words of noninmates—and also that these last words were less negative than poetry written by death-row inmates. Together, these results suggest that the experience of dying—even because of terminal illness or execution—may be more pleasant than one imagines
 
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Audience level: 0.34 (from 0.30 for The mind c ... to 0.99 for Sin gwa ga ...)

Alternative Names
Gray Kurt J.

그레이, 커트

Languages
English (26)

Korean (1)