WorldCat Identities

Head, Geoffrey A.

Overview
Works: 14 works in 24 publications in 1 language and 200 library holdings
Roles: Other, Contributor, Editor
Classifications: QP571, 612.405
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Geoffrey A Head
Principles of hormone/behavior relations by Donald W Pfaff( )

9 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introduces underlying principles of the endocrine regulation of behavior in animals and humans. Every chapter begins by stating a principle, followed by specific examples of hormone actions derived from scientific experiments and clinical observations, and concludes with a few challenging unanswered questions. The reference source Hormones, Brain & Behavior identified this field as rapidly expanding within neurobiology and endocrinology
Identification of genes with altered expression in male and female Schlager hypertensive mice by Christine L Chiu( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Principles of hormone/behavior relations, second edition by Donald W Pfaff( Book )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Factors Responsible for Obesity-Related Hypertension by Kyungjoon Lim( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The oestrogen-leptin paradox( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Imidazoline receptors Imidazoline Receptor Workshop, 10 September 1997, Melbourne, Australia( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Characteristics of renal sympathetic nerve single units in rabbits with angiotensin-induced hypertension( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Is the elevated whole renal nerve activity observed with chronic low-dose angiotensin the result of recruitment or changes in firing frequency of renal neurons? What is the main finding and its importance? Resting firing frequency of renal neurons is lower with low-dose angiotensin, but cardiac rhythmicity is reduced by high-dose angiotensin. Unitary responses to baroreceptor stimulation are reduced, but there is greater sensitivity of central chemoreceptor pathways. Elevated nerve activity in conscious animals is the result of recruitment of individual neurons normally silent but available for recruitment during physiological challenge. We examined the effect of chronic angiotensin (AngII)-induced hypertension on activity of postganglionic renal sympathetic units to determine whether altered whole renal nerve activity is due to recruitment or changes in firing frequency. Rabbits were treated with a low (20ngkg −1 min −1, 8weeks) or high dose (50ngkg −1 min −1, 4weeks) of AngII before the experiment under chloralose-urethane anaesthesia. Spontaneously active units were detected from multiunit recordings using an algorithm that separated units by action potential shape using templates that matched spikes within a prescribed standard deviation. Multiunit sympathetic nerve activity was 40% higher in rabbits treated with low-dose AngII than in sham ( P =0.012) but not different in high-dose AngII. Resting firing frequency was similar in sham rabbits (1.00±0.09spikess −1, n =144) and in those treated with high-dose AngII (1.10±0.08spikess −1, n =112) but was lower with low-dose AngII (0.65±0.08spikess −1, n =149, P <0.05). Unit firing rhythmicity was linked to the cardiac cycle and was similar in sham and low-dose AngII groups but 29-32% lower in rabbits treated with high-dose AngII ( P <0.001). Cardiac linkage followed a similar pattern during hypoxia. All units showed baroreceptor dependency. Baroreflex gain and range were reduced and curves shifted to the right in AngII groups. Firing frequency during hypoxia increased by +39% in low-dose AngII and +82% in shams, but the greatest increase was in the high-dose AngII group (+103%, P dose =0.001). Responses to hypercapnia were similar in all groups. Increases in sympathetic outflow in hypertension caused by low-dose chronic AngII administration are due to recruitment of neurons, but high-dose AngII increases firing frequency in response to chemoreceptor stimuli independently of the arterial baroreceptors. New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Is the elevated whole renal nerve activity observed with chronic low-dose angiotensin the result of recruitment or changes in firing frequency of renal neurons? What is the main finding and its importance? Resting firing frequency of renal neurons is lower with low-dose angiotensin, but cardiac rhythmicity is reduced by high-dose angiotensin. Unitary responses to baroreceptor stimulation are reduced, but there is greater sensitivity of central chemoreceptor pathways. Elevated nerve activity in conscious animals is the result of recruitment of individual neurons normally silent but available for recruitment during physiological challenge
Differential activation of renal sympathetic burst amplitude and frequency during hypoxia, stress and baroreflexes with chronic angiotensin treatment( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract New Findings What is the central question of this study? Is the elevated tonic renal nerve activity induced by chronic angiotensin administration mediated by recruitment or increased firing frequency and does this occur via stress, chemoreflex or baroreflex pathways? What is the main finding and its importance? Long-term angiotensin treatment in rabbits elevates renal sympathetic nerve activity by recruitment of previously silent fibres. This was similar to the effect of chemoreflex stimulation, but not to stress or baroreceptor activation, suggesting that presympathetic pathways activated by angiotensin may be common to those activated by chemoreceptors. Modulation of sympathetic nerve activity involves control by the CNS of the amplitude of neural discharges, reflecting recruitment of neurons and their firing frequency. We tested whether elevated tonic renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) induced by chronic angiotensin administration is mediated by recruitment or increased firing frequency and whether this is characteristic of the pattern observed with activation of stress, chemoreflex or baroreflex pathways. Conscious rabbits treated with angiotensinII for 12weeks to increase blood pressure by 10-30% were subjected to stress (air jet), hypoxia (10% O2+3% CO2) and drug-induced changes in blood pressure to produce baroreflexes. Total RSNA and RSNA burst amplitude were scaled to 100 normalized units (n.u.) by the maximal response to smoke. After 12weeks of treatment, blood pressure was 17% higher than baseline 68±1mmHg (P=0.02). Compared with sham treatment, total RSNA and burst amplitude were +82% (P<0.001) and 39% (P=0.04) greater, but burst frequency was similar. Total RSNA increased during hypoxia (+38% from 4.9±0.7n.u.), owing to greater amplitude, but not frequency. Air-jet stress increased total RSNA (+44% from 4.3±0.5n.u.) and burst frequency (+21% from 5.4±0.7burstss−1), but not amplitude. Angiotensin enhanced total RSNA responses to both air jet (+33%) and hypoxia (+58%), but only increased the amplitude response to air jet. The RSNA baroreflexes reset to the higher blood pressure, but amplitude or frequency was not differentially altered. Chronic angiotensin treatment elevated RSNA by recruitment of neurons, which is similar to chemoreflex stimulation, but not to stress or baroreceptor activation, suggesting that presympathetic pathways activated by angiotensin may be common to those activated by chemoreceptors
Home blood pressure monitoring( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Measurement of blood pressure (BP) by a doctor in the clinic has limitations that may result in an unrepresentative measure of underlying BP which can impact on the appropriate assessment and management of high BP. Home BP monitoring is the self-measurement of BP in the home setting (usually in the morning and evening) over a defined period (e.g. 7 days) under the direction of a healthcare provider. When it may not be feasible to measure 24-h ambulatory BP, home BP may be offered as a method to diagnose and manage patients with high BP. Home BP has good reproducibility, is well tolerated, is relatively inexpensive and is superior to clinic BP for prognosis of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Home BP can be used in combination with clinic BP to identify 'white coat' and 'masked' hypertension. An average home BP of at least 135/85 mmHg is an appropriate threshold for the diagnosis of hypertension. Home BP may also offer the advantage of empowering patients with their BP management, with benefits including increased adherence to therapy and lower achieved BP levels. It is recommended that, when feasible, home BP should be considered for routine use in the clinical management of hypertension
Say NO to Obesity-Related Hypertension( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Effects of Moxonidine and Low-Calorie Diet: Cardiometabolic Benefits from Combination of Both Therapies( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objective: Because sympathetic nervous system activity plays a detrimental role in metabolic and cardiovascular health, this study compared the effects of a centrally acting sympatholytic agent, the effects of a weight loss (WL) program using a low-calorie diet, and the effects of a combination of both. Methods: Young (18-30 years) male subjects with overweight (BMI > 25 kg/m 2 ) were allocated to a WL program ( n = 10), a moxonidine treatment course (M; n = 10, 0.4 mg/d), a combination of both (WL + M; n = 11), or to a control (C) group ( n = 6) for 6 months. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), endothelial function, renal function (Cockcroft-Gault formula), and the metabolic profile were assessed before and after intervention. Results: WL occurred in the WL and WL + M groups (−7.6 ± 1.9 kg, P < 0.001 in both). MSNA and systolic blood pressure decreased similarly in the WL, M, and WL + M groups (by ∼10 bursts/min, P < 0.001, and by ∼9 mm Hg, P < 0.05). All other parameters for the WL, C, and M groups remained unchanged. In the WL + M group, decreased total cholesterol (−0.78 ± 0.23 mmol/L, P < 0.001), decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.49 ± 0.16 mmol/L, P < 0.01), decreased insulin (−6.5 ± 2.8 mmol/L, P < 0.05), and attenuated glomerular hyperfiltration (−19 ± 5 mL/min, P < 0.01) occurred. Conclusions: The combination of moxonidine with a WL program has beneficial effects on aspects of the metabolic profile and end organ damage in young males with overweight
Health-related quality of life and blood pressure 12 months after renal denervation( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Aim: To examine the effect of renal denervation (RDN) on blood pressure (BP) and health-related quality of life (QoL) in patients with resistant hypertension, pseudoresistant hypertension due to a white-coat effect and in patients with uncontrolled masked hypertension. Methods: Using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Spielberger's state and trait anxiety questionnaires, we examined QoL, symptoms of depression and anxiety prior to and 12 months following RDN. BP was assessed from clinic and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) recordings. Results: Patients with uncontrolled masked hypertension had the highest BDI and anxiety scores among all groups at baseline. Twelve months following RDN clinic and ambulatory BP were reduced only in those patients with resistant hypertension (delta SBP: clinic −16 ± 3 mmHg, ABPMday −8 ± 2 mmHg, ABPMnight −8 ± 2 mmHg, all P < 0.01). Clinic BP was reduced in the pseudoresistant group (−17 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.01) but was elevated in the uncontrolled masked group (+13 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.02). In all patients, trait anxiety ( P < 0.05), BDI scores ( P < 0.05) and the SF-36 mental component summary (MCS) score ( P < 0.001) were improved. The improvement in the SF-36 MCS was confined to those patients with resistant hypertension (+4.0 ± 1.1, P < 0.01). The change in clinic BP after RDN was related to the baseline clinic BP (systolic: r = 0.54, P < 0.001; diastolic r = 0.43, P < 0.001), the number of ablations delivered (both clinic and mean day ABPM systolic r = 0.24, P < 0.05) and to the change in SF-36 MCS score (systolic: r = 0.25, P = 0.01; diastolic r = 0.24, P = 0.02). Conclusion: These results indicate that in patients with confirmed resistant hypertension, RDN is associated with a reduction in BP and a sustained improvement in mental health-related aspects of QoL
Renal nerves contribute to hypertension in Schlager BPH/2J mice by Cindy Gueguen( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.13 (from 0.07 for Principles ... to 1.00 for Renal nerv ...)

Languages
English (24)