WorldCat Identities
Thu Oct 16 17:56:34 2014 UTClccn-n500269390.10A directory of the city of Kingston, and the villages of Waterloo, Portsmouth, Williamsville and Barriefield0.580.79T. Lucreti Cari De rerum natura libri sex /27150037James_Duff_Duffn 5002693962326Duff Duff, James 1860-1940Duff, J. D.Duff, J. D. 1860-1940Duff, James D.Duff, James Duff.Duff, James Duff 1860-1940lccn-n79130756Rostovtzeff, Michael Ivanovitch1870-1952lccn-n81147209Aksakov, S. T.(Sergeĭ Timofeevich)1791-1859lccn-n79089234Lucan39-65lccn-n79120267Silius Italicus, Tiberius Catiuslccn-n79033010Lucretius Carus, Tituslccn-sh2005004837Aksakov familylccn-n79060985Juvenallccn-n50005526Bayfield, M. A.(Matthew Albert)1852-1922edtlccn-n82208110Verrall, A. W.(Arthur Woollgar)1851-1912lccn-n79068416Tolstoy, Leograf1828-1910Duff, J. D.(James Duff)1860-1940PoetryHistoryBiographyDidactic poetry, LatinCriticism, interpretation, etcEpic poetry, LatinMilitary historyRecords and correspondenceConcordancesFictionPhilosophy, AncientDidactic poetry, LatinRome (Empire)Greece--FarsalaPharsalus, Battle of (Farsala, Greece : 48 B.C.)Civil War (Rome : 49-45 B.C.)Tolstoy, Leo,--graf,Aksakov, S. T.--(Sergeĭ Timofeevich),Authors, RussianHistory, AncientSoviet UnionManners and customsPunic War, 2nd (218-201 B.C.)Short storiesAksakov familyLatin poetryEpic poetry, LatinDe rerum natura (Lucretius Carus, Titus)RussiaHerzen, Aleksandr,Classical philologySocialistsRevolutionariesScienceHannibal,FamiliesLatin literatureLucretius Carus, TitusEducationPhysics--PhilosophyVerse satire, LatinEnglish literaturePoetryLatin American Symposium on Theoretical InformaticsDivina commedia (Dante Alighieri)Eastern question (Balkan)Natural historyPolish questionMacaulay, Thomas Babington Macaulay,--Baron,Lindsay, Elizabeth Conner,Lindsay, Vachel,Latin prose literatureRoman lawDiels, Hermann,Latin poetry, Medieval and modernGreecePlagueHolmes, George Frederick,Bernays, Jacob,Büchner, Karl,1860194018861889189618981900190319041905190619081909191119121913191419151916191719181919192019211922192319241925192619271928192919301932193319341935193619371938194019421943194419451946194719481949195019511953195519561957195819601961196219631964196519661967196819691970197219731975197619771978197919801981198219831988198919901994199619971998200220042006200720092010201120122013201410555173954871.1PA6482ocn000829936ocn001149579ocn004156319ocn000343784ocn003426486ocn002176965ocn004533377ocn006476890ocn000607268ocn000406615ocn000685622ocn000164922ocn003243337ocn003646716ocn001856728ocn002222748ocn003976671ocn010249940ocn010249945ocn000188907ocn441039660ocn443000804ocn4619200971543133ocn000685622book19280.56LucanLucanHistoryPoetryLucan (M. Annaecus Lucanus, AD 39-65), son of wealthy M. Annaeus Mela and nephew of Seneca, was born at Corduba (Cordova) in Spain and was brought as a baby to Rome. In AD 60 at a festival in Emperor Nero's honour Lucan praised him in a panegyric and was promoted to one or two minor offices. But having defeated Nero in a poetry contest he was interdicted from further recitals or publication, so that three books of his epic The Civil War were probably not issued in 61 when they were finished. By 65 he was composing the tenth book but then became involved in the un-successful plot of Piso against Nero and, aged only twenty-six, by order took his own life. Quintilian called Lucan a poet "full of fire and energy and a master of brilliant phrases." His epic stood next after Virgil's in the estimation of antiquity. Julius Caesar looms as a sinister hero in his stromy chronicle in verse of the war between Caesar and the Republic's forces under Pompey, and later under Cato in Africa - a chronicle of dramatic events carrying us from Caesar's fateful crossing of the Rubicon, through the Battle of Pharsalus and death of Pompey, to Caesar victorious in Egypt. The poem is also called Pharsalia. -- jacket+-+8797449215111770ocn004156319book19270.59Silius Italicus, Tiberius CatiusPunicaHistoryMilitary historyPoetryEpic poetry, LatinSilius (T. Catius Silius Italicus), AD 25-101, was consul in 68 and governor of the province of Asia in 69; he sought no further office but lived thereafter on his estates as a literary man and collector. He revered the work of Cicero, whose Tusculan villa he owned, and that of Virgil, whose tomb at Naples he likewise owned and near which he lived. His epic Punica, in 17 books, on the second War with Carthage (218-202 BC), is based for facts largely on Livy's account. Conceived as a contrast between two great nations (and their supporting gods), championed by the two great heroes Scipio and Hannibal, his poem is written in pure Latin and smooth verse filled throughout with echoes of Virgil above all (and other poets); it exploits with easy grace, but little genius, all the devices and techniques of traditional Latin epic. -- Jacket+-+0058449215104925ocn001149579book19170.59Aksakov, S. TA Russian gentlemanBiography+-+1820637465324100121ocn000372359book19280.39Rostovtzeff, Michael IvanovitchRomeHistory+-+497755046532494624ocn000829936book19260.53Rostovtzeff, Michael IvanovitchA history of the ancient worldHistoryFor contents, see Author Catalog62280ocn010249940book18860.79Lucretius Carus, TitusT. Lucreti Cari De rerum natura libri sexHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcConcordancesPoetryDidactic poetry, Latin45022ocn003003731book19170.59Aksakov, S. TA Russian schoolboyBiography+-+K60533430639716ocn003426486book19160.63Aksakov, S. TYears of childhoodBiography+-+846043906632431111ocn003646716book19130.77Verrall, A. WCollected studies in Greek and Latin scholarship28121ocn000164922book18980.63JuvenalD. Ivnii Ivvenalis satvrae XIV. Fourteen satires of JuvenalPoetry2805ocn036045988book19370.29Tolstoy, LeoThe Kreutzer sonata and other storiesFictionThe title story is about a man whose sexual jealousy, inflamed by guilt, drives him to murder his wife+-+708783746524834ocn000188907book18980.70JuvenalSaturae XIV. Fourteen satires of JuvenalPoetry22612ocn003587978book19130.79Verrall, A. WCollected literary essays, classical and modernCriticism, interpretation, etc+-+83538767053242009ocn001383917book19230.63Herzen, AleksandrThe memoirs of Alexander Herzen, parts I and IIBiography1858ocn003243337book19170.79Duff, J. DRussian realities & problemsHistory17949ocn024055075book18890.66Lucretius Carus, TitusDe rerum naturaHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcConcordancesPoetryDidactic poetry, LatinText in Latin; introduction and notes in English16618ocn004421622book19110.63Cicero, Marcus TulliusAn easy selection from Cicero's correspondenceRecords and correspondence1257ocn002222748book19080.31Lucretius Carus, TitusLucretius: On the nature of things ; and, The Discourses of Epictetus ; and, The Meditations of Marcus AureliusHistoryPoetryDidactic poetry, Latin10650ocn025177483book18980.63JuvenalD. Iunii Iuvenalis Saturae XIV : Fourteen satires of JuvenalPoetryFirst published in 1932, as the sixth edition of an 1898 original, this collection of some of Juvenal's satires, including the often-overlooked sixth satire, was edited and abridged by noted Juvenal scholar James Duff776ocn012645973book19000.50JuvenalFourteen satires of Juvenal292ocn008267608book19250.63JuvenalD. Ivnii Ivvenalis satvrae XIV. Fourteen satires of JuvenalPoetry121ocn009462418book0.79Lucretius Carus, TitusT. Lucreti Cari De rerum natura libri sexHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcConcordancesPoetryDidactic poetry, Latin111ocn061430634book19700.63JuvenalD. Iunii Iuvenalis Saturae XIV : Fourteen satires of JuvenalPoetryFirst published in 1932, as the sixth edition of an 1898 original, this collection of some of Juvenal's satires, including the often-overlooked sixth satire, was edited and abridged by noted Juvenal scholar James Duff41ocn154140821book19230.66Lucretius Carus, TitusDe rerum naturaHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcConcordancesPoetryDidactic poetry, LatinText in Latin; introduction and notes in English11ocn154290171book19280.56LucanLucanHistoryPoetry"Lucan lived from 39-65 AD at a time of great turbulence in Rome. His Civil War portrays two of the most colourful and powerful figures of the age-Julius Caesar and Pompey the Great, enemies in a vicious struggle for power that severed bloodlines and began the transformation of Roman civilization. With Right locked in combat with Might, law and order broke down and the anarchic violence that resulted left its mark on the Roman people forever, paving the way for the imperial monarchy. Accessible and modern yet loyal to the rhetorical brilliance of the original, this will be the definitive Civil War of our times."--Publisher's website11ocn865191799book18550.10A directory of the city of Kingston, and the villages of Waterloo, Portsmouth, Williamsville and BarriefieldDirectories+-+8797449215+-+8797449215Thu Oct 16 15:14:38 EDT 2014batch32683