WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:11:29 2014 UTClccn-n500379250.00Autograph collection, 1816-19170.631.00Papers relating to the history of the theory of evolution,45044003Francis_Darwinn 5003792573163Darwin, F. (Francis), 1848-1925Darwin, F. (Francis), Sir, 1848-1925Darwin, Fr.Darwin, FrancisDarwin, Francis, SirDarwin, Francis, Sir, 1848-1925Darwin, Francisco, 1848-1925Darwin, Franciszek.Darwin, Frank, 1848-1925Dārwīn, Frānsīs, 1848-1925ダーウィン, フランシスlccn-n78095637Darwin, Charles1809-1882inslccn-n80008515Darwin, George HowardSir1845-1912illlccn-n85804083Seward, A. C.(Albert Charles)1863-1941othedtlccn-n82115390Carus, Julius Victortrllccn-n50037924Darwin, Erasmus1731-1802lccn-n82038299Ayres, P. G.(Peter G.)lccn-n79075602Simpson, George Gaylord1902-1984lccn-n79135218Galton, Francis1822-1911lccn-n80149523Hales, Stephen1677-1761lccn-n79032879Austen, Jane1775-1817Darwin, FrancisSir1848-1925BiographyRecords and correspondenceTextbooksAnecdotesHistoryHandbooks, manuals, etcCriticism, interpretation, etcEmotionsPsychology, ComparativeDarwin, Charles,InstinctVariation (Biology)Domestic animalsPlants, CultivatedNaturalistsGreat BritainCarnivorous plantsPlants--AssimilationPlants--Irritability and movementsBotanyExpressionEvolution (Biology)Facial expressionDarwin, Francis,--Sir,Natural historyNatural selectionEnglandDarwin, Erasmus,BotanistsEnglish essaysOn the origin of species (Darwin, Charles)AstronomyPlant physiologyCelestial mechanicsDarwin, George Howard,--Sir,Emotions in animalsCorrespondence (Darwin, Charles)Hales, Stephen,Austen, Jane,Galton, Francis,Beagle ExpeditionEssaysEthnopsychologyAnimal behaviorTropismsPhotographyInbreedingPlantsScientistsEmotions--Physiological aspectsPhotogravuresSarraceniaceaeHuxley, Thomas Henry,Owen, Richard,PhylogenyWallace, Alfred Russel,Flower, William Henry,184819251872187518761877187818791880188118821883188418851886188718881889189018911892189318941895189618971898189919001901190219031904190519061907190819091910191119131914191519161917191919201921192219251926192719291930193119351936193719381945194619491950195219541957195819591960196119631964196519661967196819691972197319741977197819811982198319841985198619871988198919941995199719982000200120032004200520062007200820092010201120122013118753221090152.42QH31.D2ocn001005177ocn002885451ocn002667265ocn000519165ocn000653340ocn000081038ocn002483020ocn001090110ocn000323823ocn000303636ocn186199371ocn185429895ocn186199484ocn319215943ocn460424019ocn630796286ocn630140780ocn639184424ocn457407728ocn444805663ocn800146913ocn800285235ocn800252925ocn462918503ocn827177324ocn8368300402474154ocn001005177book18870.66Darwin, CharlesThe life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapterBiographyRecords and correspondence"In choosing letters for publication I have been largely guided by the wish to illustrate my father's personal character. But his life was so essentially one of work, that a history of the man could not be written without following closely the career of the author. Thus it comes about that the chief part of the book falls into chapters whose titles correspond to the names of his books. In arranging the letters I have adhered as far as possible to chronological sequence, but the character and variety of his researches make a strictly chronological order an impossibility. It was his habit to work more or less simultaneously at several subjects. Experimental work was often carried on as a refreshment or variety, while books entailing reasoning and the marshalling of large bodies of facts were being written. Moreover, many of his researches were allowed to drop, and only resumed after an interval of years. Thus a rigidly chronological series of letters would present a patchwork of subjects, each of which would be difficult to follow. The Table of Contents will show in what way I have attempted to avoid this result. It will be seen, for instance, that the second volume is not chronologically continuous with the first. Again, in the third volume, the botanical work, which principally occupied my father during the later years of his life, is treated in a separate series of chapters"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)+-+6098553566171285ocn001141394book18800.63Darwin, CharlesThe power of movement in plants, by Charles Darwin, assisted by Francis Darwin. With a preface to the Da Capo ed. by Barbara Gillespie PickardBewegungsphysiologie, Physiologie+-+051855356675236ocn676831058com18870.29Darwin, CharlesThe autobiography of Charles Darwin from the life and letters of Charles DarwinHistoryBiographyRecords and correspondenceThe reissue of this volume is a major contribution to the history and philosophy of evolutionary thought."--BOOK JACKET+-+218069022632460731ocn002667265book19030.73Darwin, CharlesMore letters of Charles Darwin : a record of his work in a series of hitherto unpublished lettersRecords and correspondence56524ocn014805726book19090.76Darwin, CharlesThe foundations of the origin of species, two essays written in 1842 and 1844+-+504262963546814ocn001550543book19190.63Darwin, FrancisSpringtime : and other essaysHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etc46632ocn001090110book18920.70Darwin, CharlesCharles Darwin, his life told in an autobiographical chapter and in a selected series of his published lettersBiographyRecords and correspondence"In preparing this volume, which is practically an abbreviation of the Life and Letters (1887), my aim has been to retain as far as possible the personal parts of those volumes. To render this feasible, large numbers of the more purely scientific letters are omitted, or represented by the citation of a few sentences. In certain periods of my father's life the scientific and the personal elements run a parallel course, rising and falling together in their degree of interest. Thus the writing of the Origin of Species, and its publication, appeal equally to the reader who follows my father's career from interest in the man, and to the naturalist who desires to know something of this turning point in the history of Biology. This part of the story has therefore been told with nearly the full amount of available detail. In arranging my material I have followed a roughly chronological sequence, but the character and variety of my father's researches make a strictly chronological order an impossibility. It was his habit to work more or less simultaneously at several subjects. Experimental work was often carried on as a refreshment or variety, while books entailing reasoning and the marshalling of large bodies of facts were being written. Moreover many of his researches were dropped only to be resumed after years had elapsed. Thus a chronological record of his work would be a patchwork, from which it would be difficult to disentangle the history of any given subject. The Table of Contents will show how I have tried to avoid this result. It will be seen, for instance, that after Chapter VIII. a break occurs; the story turns back from 1854 to 1831 in order that the Evolutionary chapters which follow may tell a continuous story. In the same way the Botanical Work which occupied so much of my father's time during the latter part of his life is treated separately in Chapters XVI. and XVII"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)4668ocn000674632book19500.50Darwin, CharlesCharles Darwin's autobiography; with his notes and letters depicting the growth of the origin of speciesBiographyWhat sort of man was this revolutionary thinker? Just what did he do? What do his achievements mean to us and what consequences have they had for our own world? Darwin himself could not anticipate the answer to the last of these three questions. His autobiography is the best single source of answers to the first two. It must be true that no one can adequately judge his own character, but in these pages Darwin, the objective scientist, comes unusually near to a truly dispassionate estimate of himself. - p. 244543ocn020319755book18750.66Darwin, CharlesInsectivorous plantsIn this 1875 publication, Darwin details the multitude of experiments he conducted, along with many friends, colleagues, and his sons, on carnivorous plants with a special focus on the feeding mechanisms and the adaptations that enabled the plants to survive. This study of feeding flies to plants includes illustrations from Darwin and his sons+-+677362963541012ocn000005871book19170.66Darwin, FrancisRustic sounds, and other studies in literature and natural history38937ocn020167802book18890.56Darwin, CharlesThe expression of the emotions in man and animalsShares Darwin's theories about morality and intellect, scientifically examining the way in which humans and other mammals express anger, joy, anxiety, and fear+-+725109139532329ocn006384875book18900.81Darwin, FrancisPractical physiology of plantsHandbooks, manuals, etc+-+75358767052597ocn000825366book19730.86Darwin, George HowardScientific papers21119ocn002387504book19290.39Darwin, CharlesAutobiography of Charles Darwin. With two appendices. comprising a chapter of reminiscences and a statement of Charles Darwin's religious viewsBiographyDarwin's short account of his life and work is accompanied by reminiscences by his son+-+985019593610922ocn005357133book18950.86Darwin, FrancisThe elements of botanyTextbooks838ocn001184581book19090.92Darwin, CharlesThe foundations of The origin of species, a sketch written in 18428111ocn001200044book19010.73Darwin, CharlesThe variation of animals and plants under domesticationAnecdotes6912ocn832751074book18870.39Darwin, CharlesLeben und Briefe von Charles Darwin : mit einem seine Autobiographie enthaltenden Capitel; mit Porträts, Schriftprobe etc.; in drei Bänden646ocn703971063file19030.35Darwin, CharlesMore Letters of Charles Darwin -- Volume 1Records and correspondence5615ocn703944850book18870.50Darwin, CharlesLife and Letters of Charles Darwin -- Volume 2BiographyRecords and correspondence"The letters given in these chapters will illustrate and amplify the history of Charles Darwin. Specifically the following topics are discussed: the foundations of the 'Origin of Species'; the growth of the 'Origin of Species'; the unfinished book; the writing of the 'Origin of Species'; Professor Huxley on the reception of the 'Origin of Species'; the publication of the 'Origin of Species'; and the spread of evolution." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved)+-+24717539054395ocn191754392book20080.63Ayres, P. GThe aliveness of plants : the Darwins at the dawn of plant scienceHistoryBiographyThe Darwin family was instrumental in the history of botany. Their experiences illustrate the growing specialization and professionalisation of science throughout the 19th century. This book shows how botany escaped the burdens of medicine and the sterility of classification and nomenclature to become a rigorous laboratory science+-+052414603621ocn028408529mix1.00Darwin, CharlesPapers relating to the history of the theory of evolutionPortraitsRecords and correspondenceChiefly correspondence by or about men who contributed to the development of the theory of evolution; together with portraits of Darwin and prints of his family and Robert Chambers, Joseph Dalton Hooker, James Hutton, Thomas Henry Huxley, Charles Lyell, Herbert Spencer, and John Tyndall; watercolors of H.M.S. Beagle by Conrad Martens; cartoons; clippings; and other papers. Correspondents include Archibald Alison, Joseph Edgar Boehm, Samuel Butler, John Chapman, Emma Wedgwood Darwin, Erasmus Darwin, Francis Darwin, Robert Fitzroy, William Henry Flower, Francis Galton, James Hall, John Frederick William Herschel, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Wilhelm von Humboldt, Thomas Huxley, Joseph Johnson, Charles Lyell, Alexander John Gaspard Marcet, Richard Owen, Thomas Percival, John Playfair, Adam Sedgwick, Herbert Spencer, Alfred Russel Wallace, James Philip Mansel Weale, and William Whewell21ocn019090636book19261.00Conrad, JosephCatalogue of second-hand books purchased privately from the libraries of the late Joseph Conrad, Sir Lucas King, Sir Francis Darwin, and other sourcesCatalogs21ocn026754414art18880.92Darwin, FrancisThe life and letters of the late Charles Darwin. With an autobiographical chapter, by his son Francis Darwin [a review]11ocn222373923mix1.00Darwin, CharlesCharles DarwinRecords and correspondenceThe collection contains printed and manuscript materials, photo albums, correspondence, pamphlets, diaries, and various ephemera by and relating to Charles Darwin and others interested in natural history and the theory of evolution. Includes material by Bernard Darwin, Francis Darwin, Thomas Henry Huxley, Julian Huxley, John Stuart Mill, and Marie Stopes among others. The collection also contains material related to the Huxley family. A final group of manuscripts pertains to the work of the anthropologist Sir Edward Burnett Tylor (1832-1917)11ocn122523654mixMoore, E. MThere are 153 letters in this collection, many addressed to Aubrey Lackington Moore, an English writer who tried to reconcile evolution and traditional Christianity. Some letters discuss scientific questions of the day, while others are formal social notes. Also includes 24 clipped signatures11ocn822595563book18870.66Darwin, CharlesThe life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapterBiographyRecords and correspondence"In choosing letters for publication I have been largely guided by the wish to illustrate my father's personal character. But his life was so essentially one of work, that a history of the man could not be written without following closely the career of the author. Thus it comes about that the chief part of the book falls into chapters whose titles correspond to the names of his books. In arranging the letters I have adhered as far as possible to chronological sequence, but the character and variety of his researches make a strictly chronological order an impossibility. It was his habit to work more or less simultaneously at several subjects. Experimental work was often carried on as a refreshment or variety, while books entailing reasoning and the marshalling of large bodies of facts were being written. Moreover, many of his researches were allowed to drop, and only resumed after an interval of years. Thus a rigidly chronological series of letters would present a patchwork of subjects, each of which would be difficult to follow. The Table of Contents will show in what way I have attempted to avoid this result. It will be seen, for instance, that the second volume is not chronologically continuous with the first. Again, in the third volume, the botanical work, which principally occupied my father during the later years of his life, is treated in a separate series of chapters"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)11ocn122439822mixDarwin, CharlesArchive of the Darwin Papers Editorial ProjectThis collection contains a copy of almost every known Darwin letter and many letters written to him, arranged alphabetically by correspondent. They were used by the Project in preparation for their calendar (Frederick Burkhardt, et al., "A Calendar of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, 1821-1882," New York, 1985) and in the edited edition of letters that is forthcoming. There is much useful information in the "Calendar" on the history of the Darwin papers and their present state11ocn431005283book18851.00Granet, AddyLetters from L.C.S. to A.I.G. : 1850-1881Records and correspondenceEdited letters between women of two English families who met in 1850 when Lucy Cumming (L.C.S.) was 32 and the author, 17. Letters end with Lucy Cumming's death in 1881. Letter no. 63 describes a meeting with Francis Darwin01ocn086029906book19310.21Darwin, CharlesAutobiography+-+2180690226324+-+2180690226324Fri Mar 21 15:20:34 EDT 2014batch41919