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United States President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice

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Works: 154 works in 335 publications in 1 language and 6,906 library holdings
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Roles: Other
Classifications: HV6789, 364.973
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Most widely held works about United States
 
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Most widely held works by United States
The challenge of crime in a free society : a report by the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice by United States( Book )

28 editions published between 1967 and 2005 in English and held by 1,696 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report of the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice -- established by President Lyndon Johnson on July 23, 1965 -- addresses the causes of crime and delinquency and recommends how to prevent crime and delinquency and improve law enforcement and the administration of criminal justice. In developing its findings and recommendations, the Commission held three national conferences, conducted five national surveys, held hundreds of meetings, and interviewed tens of thousands of individuals. Separate chapters of this report discuss crime in America, juvenile delinquency, the police, the courts, corrections, organized crime, narcotics and drug abuse, drunkenness offenses, gun control, science and technology, and research as an instrument for reform. Significant data were generated by the Commission's National Survey of Criminal Victims, the first of its kind conducted on such a scope. The survey found that not only do Americans experience far more crime than they report to the police, but they talk about crime and the reports of crime engender such fear among citizens that the basic quality of life of many Americans has eroded. The core conclusion of the Commission, however, is that a significant reduction in crime can be achieved if the Commission's recommendations (some 200) are implemented. The recommendations call for a cooperative attack on crime by the Federal Government, the States, the counties, the cities, civic organizations, religious institutions, business groups, and individual citizens. They propose basic changes in the operations of police, schools, prosecutors, employment agencies, defenders, social workers, prisons, housing authorities, and probation and parole officers
Task force report: science and technology; a report to the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice by Institute for Defense Analyses( Book )

15 editions published between 1967 and 1976 in English and held by 630 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents study results and recommendation intended to illustrate the potential contributions of science and technology to crime control. The report supplements and amplifies the discussion of science and technology in the general report of the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, entitled "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society." Two chapters address the application of technology in police apprehension of criminals. Topics considered are the use of technology to reduce police response time, means to modernize the command and control process, and how to relieve the radio frequency congestion in most large police departments. Another chapter discusses aspects of court management, corrections, and crime prevention. The court- management discussion focuses on delay reduction in case processing. Two aspects of corrections addressed are the use of programmed instruction as a rehabilitation aid, and the use of statistical techniques to aid in correctional decisionmaking. Auto ignition redesign and street lighting are discussed as technological means to reduce crime opportunities. A chapter examines the uses of systems analysis for the study of the entire criminal justice system as an integrated whole. One chapter considers the potential role of modern information technology in the development of an integrated criminal justice information system. The final chapter outlines a program of research and development by which the Federal Government can stimulate a major infusion of science and technology into the criminal justice process and counter the broader problems of crime control
Criminal victimization in the United States; a report of a national survey by Philip H Ennis( Book )

4 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 340 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although nearly one-half of victim crimes go unreported, the surveyed crime approximated police statistics by category distribution. Half of the defendants believed the judicial response to be too lenient. There was no consensus on the proper degree of police power. Being victimized, increased one's concern about personal safety. The questionnaires used in the survey may be found in the appendices
Crime in a free society; selections from the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice by Robert Wallace Winslow( Book )

4 editions published between 1968 and 1969 in English and held by 340 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Studies in crime and law enforcement in major metropolitan areas by Albert J Reiss( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 332 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

V. 1. Section I. This report looks at the current systems of crime reporting contain some misconceptions about simple rates such as a crude crime rate. Proposals made for more specific measures of crime, on the need to identify the exposed population for which crime rates are calculated, the desirability of obtaining specific rates for both victims and offenders, and the need for developing statistical programs that provide information for the calculation of such rates are discussed. Statistics are given by way of illustration. -- Section II. Residents and business owners and managers were surveyed for their attitudes in two police districts of Boston, two in Chicago, and four in Washington, D.C. citizens who live in high crime rate areas do not perceive their neighborhoods as places where crime is a way of life. Their primary concern is with personal safety. This attitude overshadows their attitudes about police, which are generally positive. They repress crime rather than deal with its causes. They alter their behavior more than their attitudes and perceptions about the crime situation. Appendixes contain the survey instruments used. -- v. 2. Section I. This report looks at the determination of the extent to which certain factors influence the behavior of police officers and citizens toward one another. Factors related to the status and role of the citizen and the officer, their predispositions and behavior in encounters, the type of mobilization situation, and the department's policies and system of command and control were considered. Encounters in Boston, Chicago, and Washington, D.C., were observed for several weeks. The findings for both police-suspect and police-citizen encounters in terms of participant's race, social class, behavior, exhibited prejudice and demeanor are presented. Although officers maintained highly prejudicial attitudes towards blacks, they were not exhibited in encounters, but did affect the nature, formal or personal of the encounter. Policemen were constrained in acting out their feelings. -- Section II. In this report, empirical studies of police occupation and organization police themselves are empirically studied. Police officers orientation to their work and to the public with which they deal is reported. A study in perceptions and attitudes, not of actual behavior. Police officers in selected precincts in Boston, Chicago, and Washington, D.C., were surveyed for attitudes on the nature of police careers, of police work, and with their job, of their orientation toward their tasks in policing and their relationships and transactions with the public that is policed. Their perceptions of how organizations and systems that affect law enforcement have influenced or changed their work. Findings and survey instrument utilized are given
Juvenile delinquency in a free society; selections from the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice by Robert Wallace Winslow( Book )

5 editions published between 1968 and 1976 in English and held by 323 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The police and the community: the dynamics of their relationship in a changing society by Berkeley University of California( Book )

9 editions published between 1966 and 1967 in English and held by 312 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

V. 1. This report looks at the San Diego police conflict with racial and ethnic groups, the adolescent community and the court. The attitudes of the police and various elements of the public toward each other, services which the police can perform to improve police-community relations, special institutions which can be created by the police concerning police-community relations, police personnel policies, law enforcement methods relating to police-community relations, the amount and kind of police brutality, indignities, and other misconduct and methods for controlling it in the future, and the contribution and responsibility of community groups for better police-community relations are covered. -- v. 2. This report looks at the Philadelphia police conflict with racial and ethnic groups, the adolescent community and the courts. The attitudes of the police and various elements of the public toward each other, services which the police can perform to improve police-community relations, special institutions which can be created by the police concerning police-community relations, police personnel policies, law enforcement methods relating to police-community relations, the amount and kind of police brutality, indignities, and other misconduct and methods for controlling it in the future, and the contribution and responsibility of community groups for better police-community relations are covered
National Symposium on Science & Criminal Justice by National Symposium on Science and Criminal Justice( Book )

3 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Task Force report: corrections by United States( Book )

5 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report issued in conjunction with the Commission's main report, The challenge of crime in a free society
Task Force report: the courts by United States( Book )

10 editions published between 1967 and 1980 in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report of the Task Force on the Administration of Justice of the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice presents findings and recommendations that relate to problems facing the Nation's criminal courts. The report is not a comprehensive survey of American criminal courts or of the activities of the personnel related to them. It confines itself to those parts of the court system and those aspects of the criminal process that the Commission believes are in most need of reform. It focuses on urban courts, particularly urban lower courts. Two important nontrial aspects of the criminal process are considered in detail: the prosecutor's charge decision and the negotiated guilty plea. These administrative and largely invisible procedures now determine the disposition of most criminal cases in many urban courts. The task force also analyzes the sentencing decision, the laws under which it is made, the procedures by which it is made, and the training of the men who make it. It discusses the problems associated with the pretrial release of defendants and explores such subjects as structural reorganization of the courts, methods for scheduling cases and ensuring that they proceed expeditiously, and the management of jurors and witnesses. The report recognizes the importance of substantive criminal law reform and the inherent limits of effective law enforcement. Reflected in the report is the Commission's finding that a major need of many courts is more, better qualified, and better trained personnel. It examines the selection and training of judges and prosecutors
Task force report by United States( Book )

3 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Classification of offenders as an aid to efficient management and effective treatment by Marguerite Q Warren( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 78 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alternative classification typologies are described and illustrated with a number of clinical and research studies. A cross-tabulation of sixteen typological systems was presented and six cross-classification bands were identified. The six bands or offender subtypes were entitled - asocial, conformist, antisocial-manipulator, neurotic, subcultural-identifier and situational offender. It was pointed out that the consistency in the data of several typological studies which made the cross classification possible is an encouraging sign. In asking whether a typological consensus has any programmatic utility at the present time, current interest among practitioners in developing differential treatment strategies for various types of offenders was noted. It was suggested that it may be possible in the near future to make differential diagnoses of large populations, and to simplify the training of correctional workers by teaching management and treatment specialties rather than the entire range of correctional techniques. The use of differential diagnosis in decision-making along the correctional continuum and its potential value as a treatment-unifying influence was discussed. (Oringinally published as an article in the Journal Of Criminal Law, Criminology and Police Science, v. 62, n. 1, 1971, p. 239-258.)
Task Force report; organized crime, annotations and consultants' papers by United States( Book )

6 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report issued in conjunction with the Commission's main report, The challenge of crime in a free society
Effective police organization and management by G. Douglas Gourley( Book )

3 editions published between 1966 and 1967 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Drug abuse and law enforcement. A report to the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice by Inc Arthur D. Little( Book )

3 editions published between 1967 and 1976 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this report, patterns and problems of drug abuse are examined to suggest possible national policy objectives and recommend ways to pursue them. Drugs and, drug takers technical definitions, laws dealing with drug abuse, treatment, rehabilitation, and education, estimated net effect of all programs, and several correct proposals for changes in policy are presented
The need for and projected contents of a suggested property security code by J. Kinney O'Rourke( Book )

5 editions published between 1967 and 1977 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Property security regulations for existing structures and new construction, and existing structures and new construction regulation enforcement. Available statistics show the need for security legislation. Hazard factors leading to burglary, robbery, or theft are described. The burglary prevention ordinance of Oakland, the only city with one, and a suggested code and enforcement plan are presented
Subsequent arrests, convictions, and commitments among former juvenile delinquents by Henry D McKay( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report contains the follow-up studies on the criminal careers of former delinquents during the years 1920-1945. Together, the two studies tend to show the increase in the probability of involvement in adult crime as the offender moves through the rehabilitative institutions. It is concluded that the behavior of significant numbers of boys who become involved in illegal activity is not redirected toward conventional activity by the institutions created for the purpose. in addition to follow-up data, the authors briefly elaborate on the problem of crime from a legal and behavioral perspective
The juvenile court : its context, problems and opportunities by Sanford J Fox( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Even concerning recidivism prevention, there are many neglected opportunities that need to be retrieved. The fundamental contention of this paper is that this can be accomplished best if juvenile court reflects two propositions: 1. The juvenile court is first and foremost an instrument of crime prevention; 2. Children are not morally accountable for their criminal behavior. The remainder of this paper is devoted to exploring the basis for these two assertions and to examining some of their implications for the juvenile court
Task Force report: juvenile delinquency and youth crime; report on juvenile justice, and consultants' papers by United States( Book )

4 editions published between 1967 and 1968 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A socio-economic analysis of juvenile delinquency that is critical of society's approach to juvenile crime responds with recommendations and principles for change. Efforts to modernize the juvenile court system and the general attitude of the public sector toward youth crime are discussed. To teach the youthful offenders involvement in community life, the public and private sectors of the population must respond to youthful needs. Emphasis is placed on the following areas for changes in attitude and approach of responsible individuals - public officials, community and social agencies, teachers, and potential employers. Greatest emphasis is placed on juvenile justice system personnel ranging from the police to the judge. The Gault decision is discussed as a viable vehicle for giving perspective to future programs and priorities. That a revitalized juvenile court system is needed is a logical conclusion
 
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The challenge of crime in a free society : a report by the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice
Alternative Names
President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice (U.S.)

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice (US)

United States. Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice

United States. Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, President's

United States. Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, President's Commission on

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English (133)

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