WorldCat Identities

ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education

Overview
Works: 439 works in 930 publications in 1 language and 25,166 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Juvenile works  Cross-cultural studies  History 
Roles: Other, Editor
Classifications: H62, 300.7
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education
 
Most widely held works by ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education
Review of research in social studies education, 1970-1975( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 296 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Teaching America's Founding Documents by John J Patrick( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 206 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Great ideas about law, government, and the rights of individuals, embedded in U.S. founding documents, are the connective cords by which national unity and civic identity have been maintained in the United States from the 1770s until today. To be a citizen is to understand and have a reasonable commitment to the ideas in the founding documents. This digest (1) identifies four founding documents and the great ideas in them; (2) discusses inclusion of the founding documents and great ideas in the core curriculum of schools; and (3) provides an annotated list of World Wide Web sites for teachers and learners on the founding documents and the great ideas in these primary sources. (Contains a list of 12 references and ERIC resources.) (BT)
Teaching Artistically Able Students with Exceptionalities by Robin Johnson( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 203 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Creating differentiated art curricula to accommodate artistically talented student individual needs may enhance student performance and program outcomes. This digest discusses: (1) individual education plans for artistically able students with exceptionalities; (2) subgroups of students with dual exceptionalities; (3) methods of teaching students with dual exceptionalities; and (4) methods of teaching students with specific disabilities. (Contains 12 references.) (BT)
Teaching Historical Thinking by Frederick D Drake( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 203 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cognitive studies researcher, Samuel Wineburg, has conducted empirical studies over the past decade to compare the way historians think about primary and secondary sources with the thinking processes of high school students and teachers. Wineburg's research demonstrates the importance of domain-based or subject-specific thinking in the teaching and learning of history. This digest addresses Wineburg's conception of historical thinking and its application to the teaching and learning of history in schools. It discusses: (1) Wineburg's sourcing heuristic and corroboration heuristic in historical thinking; (2) Wineburg's findings on historical thinking and domain-specific knowledge; (3) applications of historical thinking to reading and interpreting documents; and (4) Internet resources for teachers of historical thinking. (BT)
The 2001 NAEP in U.S. History by John J Patrick( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since its inception by the United States Congress in 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has collected information about what U.S. students know and can achieve in core subjects of the school curriculum. The U.S. history NAEP assessments were conducted in 1986, 1988, 1994, and 2001. This digest discusses: (1) the framework of the 2001 NAEP in U.S. history; (2) the assessment procedures; and (3) the findings of this national assessment of achievement in U.S. history by students at grades 4, 8, and 12. (BT)
Developing an International Framework for Education in Democracy by Charles F Bahmueller( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is it possible to develop an international consensus on the meaning of democracy and education for democratic citizenship? A cooperative project administered by the Center for Civic Education (CCE) in Calabasas, California is attempting to answer this question. Since 1996, the CCE has been developing "An International Framework for Education in Democracy," an international project with advisors and critics from every inhabited continent. This Digest discusses: (1) the purpose of the project to develop the International Framework; (2) the structure and content of the International Framework; and (3) the ongoing process of developing the International Framework. (BT)
Tips for social studies teachers : activities from ERIC by Laurel R., Ed Singleton( Book )

6 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Grade level: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, p, e, i, s, t
State Standards for Civic Education by John J Patrick( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 199 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A recent report, "Educating Democracy: State Standards to Ensure a Civic Core," was issued by the Albert Shanker Institute of the American Federation of Teachers. This report comparatively analyzes and evaluates the standards for the teaching and learning of civics which state-level departments of education in the United States have developed. This Digest addresses the following: (1) the purposes and rationale for this inquiry about state standards for civic education; (2) the criteria that guided the inquiry; (3) the findings of the inquiry; and (4) suggestions for improving civic education. (Contains 12 references.) (BT)
Tora no maki II : lessons for teaching about contemporary Japan by Washington, DC National Council for the Social Studies( Book )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 195 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Tora no Maki" or "Scroll of the Tiger" is a teacher's guide designed to aid in teaching appropriate standards for social studies content and skills, using a contemporary focus on Japan's culture and economy. Topics of the 22 lessons include: group culture, school population, economics, geography, the Internet, family values, Japanese gardens, food, business, stereotypes, transportation, calligraphy, teenage lifestyles, cities, the peace movement, and the environment. Each lesson addresses specific National Council for the Social Studies standards and lists recommended grade level (elementary school, middle school, or high school), objectives, time allotment, resources required, assessment, primary source material, and supplemental resources. (Kcm)
Developing political tolerance by Patricia G Avery( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 195 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Political tolerance is the willingness to extend basic rights and civil liberties to persons and groups whose viewpoints differ from one's own. It is a central tenet of a liberal democracy. The individual rights and freedoms that U.S. citizens value encourage a wide array of ideas and beliefs, some of which may offend segments of the population. The expression of those beliefs is protected by another core democratic principle, that of majority rule with respect for the rights of individuals or groups in the minority. Without safeguards for the free expression of divergent opinions, we risk a tyranny of the majority. In a free and open society, public deliberation exposes "bad" ideas instead of suppressing them. The protection of individuals' rights, including those of individuals we dislike or with whom we strongly disagree, has often been a struggle in U.S. society. Consider the interment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the interrogation of suspected American Communists in the 1950s, or the FBI files on Vietnam War protesters. In each case, U.S. citizens tended to support the abnegation of rights for unpopular minorities. Opposition to intolerance and support for minority rights among the populace, however, can be developed through effective teaching of political tolerance in elementary and secondary schools. This digest discusses: (1) findings of research on political tolerance; (2) guidelines on teaching for political tolerance; and (3) positive consequences of effective teaching for political tolerance. (Contains 10 references.) (BB)
Using microcomputers in the social studies classroom by Robert B., Ed Abelson( Book )

5 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this book is to help teachers feel at ease with microcomputers so that they will begin to think of computers as tools that they themselves might use. There are four chapters. The first chapter provides basic information to help a user understand the computer. Discussed are how the computer is put together and how it works. To help teachers generate ideas about how this new educational aid might be useful in terms of their own teaching objectives, the second chapter describes why and how other educators are using the computer. Chapter 3 is an introduction to software evaluation, I.E., how computer programs that are available for use in the classroom can be judged. Criteria are presented. It is suggested that teachers using computer-assisted instruction should have a feel for some of the broader issues related to computers in education, as well as practical knowledge. The purpose of the fourth chapter, which deals with social and educational issues and directions, is to provide a perspective about these broader issues and a context into which teachers might place their own activities. Most of the book's readings provide a bibliography of references and further resources. In addition, a list of resources available through the eric system is provided. (Rm)
Japanese education in grades K-12 by Lucien Ellington( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Japan's educational system, in particular its K-12 schools, remains one of the very best in the world. This digest provides an overview of the following topics: (1) Japanese educational achievements; (2) the structure of K-12 education in Japan; (3) the K-12 curriculum, with an emphasis on social studies education; (4) educational reform in Japan; and (5) Web sites on Japanese education. (BB)
Teaching about the United States Supreme Court by Sarah Drake Brown( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 190 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest highlights the Constitutional and statutory foundations of the United States Supreme Court, discusses the changing role of the Supreme Court, and recommends online resources helpful in teaching and learning about the United States Supreme Court. The digest addresses general concerns of delegates at the Constitutional Convention, Federalist 51, Federalist 78, the Judiciary Act of 1789 (establishing and organizing the federal judiciary), judicial review, Marbury v. Madison (1803), and what enables the Supreme Court to secure justice. (BB)
Civic knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of ninth graders in the United States : results from the IEA Civic Education Study by Carole Hahn( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 188 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What do ninth grade students in the United States know about democracy and democratic principles? What attitudes do they have toward civic issues? What experiences have they had in democratic participation and how engaged do they expect to be in the political arena as adults? How do youth in the United States compare with their peers in other nations on indicators of civic knowledge and engagement? Those questions and others were addressed in the recent Civic Education (CivEd) study conducted under the auspices of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). This digest reports the main findings of the United States portion of the IEA CivEd study. (BB)
Teaching primary school children about Japan through art by Patricia Berg Ward( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

There are a variety reasons for teaching about Japan. Many students in the United States are of Japanese heritage; Japan is the second largest trading partner of the United States; and some healing still needs to occur between the United States and Japan because of the damage and pain of World War II. Further, the Unites States and Japan share the Pacific Ocean, its waters and fisheries. Mutual cultural understanding and effective communication skills are necessary for the best use of these shared resources. Many primary teachers excel at teaching about Japan through activities about food, language, holidays, and artifacts. Learning about Japan through the visual arts also should be a part of this list of activities. Visual thinking provides the opportunity to focus carefully on an image in order to recall and reproduce it at a later time; to delve into an image in order to understand its deeper implications; and to take time to look at an image in order to provide a place of serenity and quiet in the midst of a fast, harried world. Two- and three-dimensional representations are powerful ways by which to integrate Japanese studies into curricular areas and into the development of critical thinking skills. The ideas in this ERIC Digest are offered to stimulate thinking about Japanese art, visual thinking, and practical ways for studying about Japan using art. Lessons can be integrated into other curriculum areas including mathematics and social studies. (Contains 11 references.) (LB)
Teaching about aging : religion and advocacy perspectives( Book )

2 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 183 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The IEA civic education study : expectations and achievements of students in thirty countries by Judith Torney-Purta( )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This ERIC Digest reports on the origins, purposes, and methods of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) Civic Education Study. In 1993, the General Assembly of the IEA decided to carry out a two phase study of civic education. The goal of the two phase study was to identify and examine in a comparative framework the ways in which young people are prepared for their roles as citizens in democracies and societies aspiring to democracy. Both phases of the study were designed to provide information regarding 15 questions of interest to policymakers and educators. The three content domains covered in the study were: (1) democracy, democratic institutions, and citizenship; (2) national identity and international relations; and (3) social cohesion and diversity (including an understanding of discrimination). Phase 1 of the study was more qualitative and used interviews with experts on civic education, analyzed curriculum frameworks, national standards, and textbooks, and gathered information from focus groups. Twelve common themes were identified including: (1) there is a common core of content topics across countries; and (2) social diversity is an area of concern in nearly all countries participating in the study. Phase 2 of the study will analyze test data from 120,000 students aged 14 and 17-18 from the participating countries. The test instrument includes items about democratic principles, citizenship, political engagement, fact based instruction, and classroom climates. Teacher and school questionnaires also are to be administered. The release of the Phase 2 report will be in early 2001. (JH)
Learning history through children's literature by Lynn R Nelson( )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 175 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Teaching history using children's literature, both fiction and non-fiction, is an old idea enjoying new vitality in the elementary and middle school curriculum. This digest discusses: (1) the revival of interest in teaching history through children's literature; (2) research-based guidelines for teachers of history and children's literature, and (3) an innovative method of teaching history using children's literature. Teachers can enhance children's historical understanding by using instructional strategies that place a particular event or time period within the context of a broader framework of time. The history fair, a seven-week unit created by a fifth-grade teacher to teach research skills, illustrates the connection between historical fiction and nonfiction and challenges students to demonstrate their learning in a public forum as they become experts on topics that interest them. (Contains 11 references.) (JH)
Teaching about the Louisiana Purchase by John J Patrick( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The year 2003 marks the bicentennial of the 1803 Treaty of France, by which the United States of America acquired the Louisiana Territory, an area of more than 828,000 square miles. Upon this acquisition, known as the Louisiana Purchase, the territory of the United States doubled. Historians consider the Louisiana Purchase to be a landmark event or turning point in U.S. history. This Digest discusses the following: (1) President Thomas Jefferson's decision to purchase the Louisiana Territory; (2) the significant consequences of this decision in U.S. history; and (3) methods of teaching about the Louisiana Purchase. (BT)
Law-Related Education and Delinquency Prevention by Michelle Parrini( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evidence from research/evaluation studies indicates that the principles underlying law-related education (LRE) programs address the factors that put youth at risk for delinquency. Although rigorous evaluations of LRE are limited, what evidence exists suggests that LRE has potential to prevent delinquency and problem behavior. This digest discusses: (1) the connection between LRE and delinquency prevention; (2) the impact of successful LRE on delinquency prevention; and (3) future directions of LRE programs that address delinquency. The digest suggests that adopting additional characteristics of effective prevention programs to enhance the delinquency prevention potential of LRE should be explored. (BT)
 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.44 (from 0.40 for Review of ... to 0.51 for Guide to t ...)

Alternative Names
ChESS

Clearinghouse for Social Studies

E.R.I.C./C.H.E.S.S.

E.R.I.C. Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education

Educational Resources Information Center U.S. Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education

Educational Resources Information Center Washington, DC Clearinghouse for Social Studies, Social Science Education

ERIC/ChESS

ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies, Social Science Education Boulder, Color

United States Educational Resources Information Center Clearinghouse for Social Studies

Languages
English (50)