WorldCat Identities
Thu Oct 16 18:00:03 2014 UTClccn-n500310310.00The place in letters of Henry Norman Hudson0.471.00Twelfth night; or, what you will. With introduction, and notes explanatory and critical. For use in schools and families60025642n 5003103166395Hudson, H. N.Hudson, H. N. 1814-1886Hudson, H. N. (Henry Norman), 1814-1886Hudson, Henry N.Hudson, Henry N. 1814-1886Hudson, Henry N. (Henry Norman), 1814-1886lccn-n78095332Shakespeare, William1564-1616lccn-n88646083Black, Ebenezer Charlton1861-1927edtlccn-no99046028George, Andrew Jackson1855-1907edtlccn-n50034557Gollancz, Israel1864-1930edtlccn-n79082191Herford, C. H.(Charles Harold)1853-1931edtlccn-n80034929Webster, Daniel1782-1852lccn-n85363511Butler, Benjamin F.(Benjamin Franklin)1818-1893lccn-n81147432HenryIVKing of England1367-1413lccn-n80037043RichardIIIKing of England1452-1485fast-950776Hamlet (Legendary character)Hudson, Henry Norman1814-1886DramaCriticism, interpretation, etcHistoryJuvenile worksOutlines, syllabi, etcPoetryBiographyDictionariesConcordancesFictionFathers and daughtersCaesar, JuliusTwinsEurope--IllyriaItaly--VeniceBrothers and sistersJewsMistaken identityShakespeare, William,MoneylendersItalyRome (Empire)ExilesShipwreck survivalAssassinationAssassinsConspiraciesLear, King (Legendary character)Kings and rulersEnglish dramaAs you like it (Shakespeare, William)Inheritance and successionAging parentsBritonsItaly--VeronaShylock (Fictitious character)Juliet (Fictitious character)Romeo (Fictitious character)Macbeth,--King of Scotland,Julius Caesar (Shakespeare, William)VendettaYouthBrutus, Marcus Junius,Civil War (Rome : 43-31 B.C.)English drama--Early modern and ElizabethanMerchant of Venice (Shakespeare, William)Twelfth night (Shakespeare, William)English drama (Tragedy)Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare, William)English literatureEnglish drama (Comedy)ScotlandRegicidesEnglish poetrySurvivalKing Lear (Shakespeare, William)ComedyPlays (Shakespeare, William)DramaPromptbooks181418861845184618471848185018511852185318561857186018611864186518671870187118721873187418751876187718781879188018811882188318841885188618871888188918901891189218931894189518961897189818991900190119021903190419051906190719081909191019111912191319141915191619201922192419261927193019331934193519371938193919401942194419501954195519581961196219631967196819691970197119721973197619771978199219942000200420082009201020122013149984191517822.33PR2837.A2ocn001383068ocn002540385ocn001383266ocn003531910ocn001850266ocn001438280ocn002026909ocn001438653ocn001438434ocn002764101ocn022688331ocn030556879ocn037174363ocn024806375ocn016846250ocn866419435ocn866147091ocn02593532791472ocn000812102book18720.50Hudson, Henry NormanShakespeare : his life, art, and characters : with an historical sketch of the origin and growth of the drama in EnglandHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcBiography+-+839897899632458320ocn005794374book18700.27Shakespeare, WilliamThe merchant of VeniceCriticism, interpretation, etcJuvenile worksBibliographyComic books, strips, etcGlossaries, vocabularies, etcFictionQuotationsDictionariesPictorial worksDramaStudy guidesSourcesGraphic novelsHigh interest-low vocabulary booksArtists' booksIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson LL D45124ocn001399869book18710.24Shakespeare, WilliamThe tragedy of Julius CaesarHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcJuvenile worksBiographyComic books, strips, etcConcordancesGlossaries, vocabularies, etcFictionEncyclopediasDictionariesOutlines, syllabi, etcTextbooksDramaStudy guidesSourcesStories, plots, etcGraphic novelsHigh interest-low vocabulary booksIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson LL D43519ocn001166144book19000.26Shakespeare, WilliamAs you like itHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcJuvenile worksGlossaries, vocabularies, etcFictionDictionariesDramaStudy guidesSourcesRecords and correspondenceGraphic novelsHigh interest-low vocabulary booksPastoral dramaProgram. The Ben Greet Players in open air performances of Shakespeare's comedies, Woodley Park (Connecticut Ave. and Woodley Lane), the forest scenes of "As You Like It."+-+556319989642321ocn004443065book19020.26Shakespeare, WilliamTwelfth night; or, What you willHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcJuvenile worksBibliographyComic books, strips, etcExaminations, questions, etcGlossaries, vocabularies, etcFictionDictionariesOutlines, syllabi, etcPictorial worksDramaStudy guidesSourcesFilm adaptationsGraphic novelsHigh interest-low vocabulary booksIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson, LL D40216ocn000306220book19040.27Shakespeare, WilliamThe tragedy of MacbethCriticism, interpretation, etcJuvenile worksDramaStudy guidesHistorical dramaIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson, LL D3558ocn001883707book19000.59Shakespeare, WilliamThe tragedy of HamletDramaIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson LL D32310ocn060714006file18820.88Hudson, Henry NormanWebster centennial a discourse delivered on the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Daniel Webster, January 18, 1882Biography32219ocn060712907file18760.88Hudson, Henry NormanText-book of prose from Burke, Webster, and Bacon : with notes and sketches of the authors' lives : for use in schools and classes30310ocn000352128book19090.47Shakespeare, WilliamThe comedy of The tempestDramaIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson LL D2759ocn000306228book18800.26Shakespeare, William... The tragedy of King LearCriticism, interpretation, etcDramaStudy guidesFilm adaptationsIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson LL D24914ocn000653995book18480.77Hudson, Henry NormanLectures on ShakespeareCriticism, interpretation, etcBiography24727ocn001063476book18460.53Shakespeare, WilliamShakespeare's Merchant of Venice : for use in schools and classesCriticism, interpretation, etcDramaIn this lively comedy of love and money in sixteenth-century Venice, Bassanio wants to impress the wealthy heiress Portia but lacks the necessary funds. He turns to his merchant friend, Antonio, who is forced to borrow from Shylock, a Jewish moneylender. When Antonio's business falters, repayment becomes impossible -- and by the terms of the loan agreement, Shylock is able to demand a pound of Antonio's flesh2367ocn000306262book19080.33Shakespeare, WilliamA midsummer night's dream2278ocn001832201book19220.39Shakespeare, WilliamKing Henry the Fourth, part IFictionDramaHistorical drama21515ocn002453161book18810.77Shakespeare, WilliamThe complete works of William Shakespeare : with a life of the poet, explanatory foot-notes, critical notes, and a glossarial index21515ocn006973749book18800.56Shakespeare, WilliamShakespeare's King Henry the Eighth : with introduction, and notes explanatory and critical ; for use in schools and familiesDrama1918ocn006435797book18800.39Shakespeare, WilliamKing Henry the FifthHistoryDramaIncludes index and notes. Introduction and notes by Henry Norman Hudson, LL D1907ocn002554471book19160.23Shakespeare, WilliamThe tragedy of Romeo and JulietCriticism, interpretation, etcJuvenile worksFictionDramaProvides the text of the play, accompanied by notes and an introduction. Also includes a section of study questions and a brief biography of Shakespeare1858ocn011564124book18650.77Hudson, Henry NormanA chaplain's campaign with Gen. ButlerHistoryPersonal narrativesThe author served in the 1st New York Engineer Regiment as a Chaplain during the U.S. Civil War21011ocn317693064file18650.86Davenport, John IOfficial documents relating to a "chaplain's campaign (not) with General Butler," but in New YorkHistoryPersonal narrativesEmbodies a report to General Butler by his former assistant provost marshal, John I. Davenport, on the facts in the case of Chaplain Henry N. Hudson1796ocn056754840file18650.77Hudson, Henry NormanA chaplain's campaign with Gen. ButlerHistoryPersonal narrativesThe author served in the 1st New York Engineer Regiment as a Chaplain during the U.S. Civil War622ocn001924880book18830.26Shakespeare, WilliamThe complete works of William ShakespeareHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcSoftwareBiographyConcordancesGlossaries, vocabularies, etcPoetryIllustrationsPictorial worksHandbooks, manuals, etcDramaStories, plots, etcA new edition of Shakespeare's works, presented in a newly considered chronological order, with original titles restored, and the canon reconsidered213ocn614561486file18860.95Rankin, Jeremiah EamesThe Shakespearean interpreter with memorial words respecting Henry Norman Hudson; an address delivered before the alumni of Middlebury CollegeHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etc183ocn010637285book19160.88The Place in letters of Henry Norman Hudson121ocn002050968book0.35Shakespeare, WilliamThe Aldus Shakespeare, Romeo and JulietDrama41ocn013839656book18900.37Shakespeare, WilliamShakespeare's Much ado about nothingCriticism, interpretation, etcJuvenile worksDrama32ocn019296157book18881.00Shakespeare, WilliamTwelfth night; or, what you will. With introduction, and notes explanatory and critical. For use in schools and families31ocn068045328book19150.47The Place in letters of Henry Norman Hudson21ocn034907212book18800.92Hudson, Henry NormanA work of world-wide interest. The Harvard Shakespeare11ocn435428762book1846Hudson, Henry NormanAutograph letter signed from Henry Norman Hudson, Boston, to George A. Blanchard, Charles A. Evans, and M.J. Willard, Concord, New HampshireWill be able to lecture in Boston this winter and will charge $20 for one and $100 for six11ocn435428765book1847Hudson, Henry NormanAutograph letter signed from Henry Norman Hudson, Boston, to George A. Blanchard, Concord, New HampshireHe is scheduled to lecture at Fall-River on Wednesday the 6th and so cannot serve Blanchard that evening11ocn435428758book1877Hudson, Henry NormanAutograph letter signed from H.N. Hudson, Cambridge, to A.H. Dooley, Terre Haute, IndianaManuscriptsConcerning the publishing of his edition of Shakespeare and The classical English reader. Recommends Wordsworth, Spenser, Milton, Burns, Coleridge, and Byron to be read for studying poetry. For prose he recommends Edmund Burke, [Sir Walter] Scott, Bishop Butler, and [Robert] Southey11ocn694758607mix18531.00Hooker, HermanHerman Hooker letters to Rufus W. GriswoldHoeker discusses a "notice" of "poor [Horace Binney] Wallace" which he has written and wishes Griswold to publish. Mentions a previous notice published by [Henry N.] Hudson in the "Churchman." He would prefer publication in a pamphlet and describes John Wallace's interest and his wish to be anonymous. He congratuates Griswold on his "good wife." He also sends him a copy of "The planter," a racy book which may not suit11ocn428977187book1877Hudson, Henry NormanAutograph letter signed from H.N. Norman, 38 Bigelow Street, Cambridge, J. Parker NorrisManuscriptsHe sent Norris a copy of Classical English reader and hopes that the selections, especially those from Shakespeare, will meet his approval. Has sent a copy of the book to Furness along with a letter telling Furness that he did not write the nasty notice about Furness's Hamlet in the North American. Expresses his anxiety about the success of the Classical English reader and asks Norris if he could help start it in the Philadelphia schools11ocn428977183book1877Hudson, Henry NormanAutograph letter signed from H.N. Hudson, 38 Bigelow Street, Cambridge, to J. Parker NorrisManuscriptsRegarding the publishing of The classical English reader. He would be glad to write a notice of Furness's Hamlet for the Atlantic monthly if asked. He has not heard from Crosby recently because of his marriage11ocn228705560book1915Wright, Charles BThe place in letters of Henry Norman Hudson11ocn463451918bookCrosby, JosephAutograph letters signed from Joseph Crosby, Zanesville, Ohio, to various recipientsCriticism, interpretation, etcManuscriptsThroughout the letters Crosby refers to bleak economic conditions. He mentions the riots of July 1877 and discusses the candidacy of Governor Hayes for the presidency and of Mr. Bishop for the governorship of Ohio. In (196, 240) Crosby lauds Henry Irving's writings on Shakespeare. In (141-142) he gives his impressions of Asa Fish. (102) He saw George Rignold act Henry V, (108) Barry Sullivan act Hamlet, and (162, 167) Lilian Neilson act Juliet. (229) He discusses Edwin Forrest. (235) He attended the Shakespeare readings given by the actor (James Edward?) Murdock. In (20) Crosby encloses a "List of Complete Editions of Shakespeare, in my Library, February 7, 1875." In (122) he quotes R.H. Stoddard's poem on Shakespeare beginning, "It shall be so no more." In (142) he quotes part of a letter from E.J. Corson, ca. November 1876. In (177 and 180) he quotes postcards of March 11 and 15, 1877, from Furnivall. With (180) he encloses a program for a concert given at Ingleby's home, June 4, 1876. Part of (152) is written on the back of a letter from Emma Allen, ca. December 1876, (134) on the back of a letter from Mrs. M.E. Darlington, September 9, 187611ocn428977184book1873Hudson, Henry NormanAutograph letter signed from Henry Norman Hudson, 38 Bigelow Street, Cambridgeport, to J.P. NorrisManuscriptsHudson speaks of the new edition of Shakespeare that he is working on and methods for teaching Shakespeare. He bemoans the lack of a Shakespeare society in Boston and dearth of easily accessible materials for research. Mentions fellow Shakespearian scholars [Horace Howard] Furness and Joseph Crosby11ocn435428760book1877Hudson, Henry NormanAutograph letter signed from Henry Norman Hudson, Cambridge, to A.H. Dooley, Opera-House Bookstore, Terre Haute, IndianaManuscriptsLauds Dyce's, White's, Howard Stauton's, and H.H. Furness's Shakespeare editions. He considers the "Cambridge Edition" to be the very best+-+8398978996324+-+8398978996324Thu Oct 16 15:55:51 EDT 2014batch49274