WorldCat Identities

Quinn, Robert P.

Overview
Works: 49 works in 150 publications in 1 language and 2,101 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Software  Abstracts  Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Author, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Robert P Quinn
The decision to discriminate; a study of executive selection by Robert P Quinn( Book )

16 editions published between 1968 and 1975 in English and held by 507 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents results of a study based on a sample of managers who worked for large manufacturing concerns and who had responsibility for personnel decisions to hire or promote other managers. The three companies participating in the study were located in the Cleveland-Akron area. See pp. 69-73, "Measuring Discrimination against Jews, " which shows that discrimination was present but of relatively low magnitude. Pp. 93-107, "The Decision to Discriminate: The Effect of Anti-Semitic Attitudes and Beliefs, " analyze the personalities and beliefs of antisemitic managers
The Chosen few; a study of discrimination in executive selection( Book )

7 editions published between 1968 and 1996 in English and held by 349 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 1972-73 quality of employment survey : descriptive statistics, with comparison data from the 1969-70 survey of working conditions : report to the Employment Standards Administration, U.S. Department of Labor by Robert P Quinn( Book )

8 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 255 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The sourcebook of tables presents basic descriptive statistics on all questions asked in the 1972-73 Quality of Employment Survey. Based on the Survey of Working Conditions 1969-70, this second survey obtained data from the same population and repeated the same core measures, with some adjustment. Data for the survey were obtained through personal interviews with 1,496 persons 16 years of age or older, and employed for pay for 20 or more hours a week. General survey methodology and outcome measures are discussed. Tables are grouped into the following area: comparisons among labor standard problem areas, wages and wage loss, hours and other time-related problems, health and safety, transportation to and from work, unions, discrimination, employment agencies, job security, supervision and interpersonal relations, promotions, content of work, meaning of work, and personal characteristics. The article, "Evaluating Working Conditions in American: Is the Sky Really Falling?" Summarizes many of the 1973 Survey statistics, and is presented in full. The full 1972-73 survey interview, including the page number in the document that shows the appropriate descriptive statistics for each question, and an updated version of the documentary products for the 1969-70 and the 1972-73 surveys are appended. (Lh)
The 1977 quality of employment survey : descriptive statistics, with comparison data from the 1969-70 and the 1972-73 surveys by Robert P Quinn( Book )

10 editions published between 1978 and 1979 in English and held by 242 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Education and job satisfaction : a questionable payoff by Robert P Quinn( Book )

4 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 173 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Job satisfaction: is there a trend? by Robert P Quinn( Book )

5 editions published in 1974 in English and Undetermined and held by 166 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A detailed review is presented of some of the major research on job satisfaction conducted in the past 40 years. The information is discussed in five major sections, each introduced by a series of related questions, under the following headings: national trends in job satisfaction, 1958-73; distribution of job satisfaction in the work force (by occupation, sex, education, and age); what Americans want from their jobs (national sample, white collar, blue collar, and women worker's preferences); the importance of job satisfaction (from the perspective of the employer, the employee, and society); and new approaches, strategies, and findings (goals to be achieved or ignored, necessary assumptions, matching workers and jobs, training, changing the job--hours, bases of compensation, supervision, and work performed, and evaluating the change). Four pages of references are included, together with appendixes covering: characteristics of national surveys cited; problems with single-question measures of overall job satisfaction; sampling errors at the 95 percent confidence level; percentage of "satisfied" workers 1958-73 by race, education, age, and sex; and mean job satisfaction in 1973 by selected demographic and occupational characteristics. (SA)
Survey of working conditions : November, 1969-January 1970 by Robert P Quinn( Book )

5 editions published between 1971 and 1975 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Quality of employment survey, 1973-1977 : panel by Robert P Quinn( Book )

9 editions published between 1979 and 2001 in 3 languages and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study contains data on the working conditions of 1,455 workers aged 16 and older who were working for pay for 20 or more hours per week in the United States in the period 1973-1977. This survey is a panel study version of the cross-section study, QUALITY OF EMPLOYMENT SURVEY, 1977: CROSS-SECTION (ICPSR 7689). The surveys were undertaken by the investigators to provide an overview of working conditions in the American labor force. The aims of these surveys and many of the questions that were asked were comparable to those of the related collections, SURVEY OF WORKING CONDITIONS, 1969-1970 (ICPSR 3507), and QUALITY OF EMPLOYMENT SURVEY, 1972-1973 (ICPSR 3510). The major measures used in each of the four surveys were the frequency and severity of labor standards problems, the quality of employment indicators that were shown to be predictors of job satisfaction, the job satisfaction indices themselves, and the ratings of important job facets. Respondents were asked questions about many facets of their job situations and other areas of their lives that might be affected by their jobs in order to assess the impact of work on them. Questions included job tension, security, physical health, job satisfaction, and financial well-being. A series of questions regarding job expectations was also asked. Additional questions probed respondents' feelings about their overall contentment with their jobs and with life in general. Other variables probed respondents' feelings about their work culture, physical work environment, discrimination at work, job fringe benefits, and labor unions, as well as child care provisions, nature of time spent with children and spouse, use of leisure time, and electoral participation. Demographic variables provide information on age, sex, marital status, race, place of birth, education, and income ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/07696.xml
1972-73 quality of employment survey : winter 1972-1973 by Robert P Quinn( Book )

5 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Quality of employment survey, 1977 : cross-section by Robert P Quinn( Book )

6 editions published between 1979 and 2000 in 3 languages and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study contains data on the working conditions of 1,515 workers aged 16 and older who were working for pay for 20 or more hours per week in the United States in 1977. This survey is the third undertaken by the investigators to provide an overview of working conditions in the American labor force. The aims of this survey and many of the questions that were asked were comparable to those of the related collections, SURVEY OF WORKING CONDITIONS, 1969-1970 (ICPSR 3507), and QUALITY OF EMPLOYMENT SURVEY, 1972-1973 (ICPSR 3510). The major measures used in each of the three surveys were the frequency and severity of labor standards problems, the quality of employment indicators that were shown to be predictors of job satisfaction, the job satisfaction indices themselves, and the ratings of important job facets. Respondents were asked questions about many facets of their job situations and other areas of their lives that might be affected by their jobs in order to assess the impact of work on them. Questions included job tension, security, physical health, job satisfaction, and financial well-being. A series of questions regarding job expectations was also asked. Additional questions probed respondents' feelings about their overall contentment with their jobs and with life in general. This survey differs from the earlier surveys in the greater emphasis that was placed on questions related to respondents' feelings about their work culture, physical work environment, discrimination at work, job fringe benefits, and labor unions, as well as child care provisions, nature of time spent with children and spouse, use of leisure time, and electoral participation. Demographic variables provide information on age, sex, marital status, race, education, and income
Turnover and training: a social-psychological study of disadvantaged workers by Robert P Quinn( Book )

2 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Organizational stress: studies in role conflict and ambiguity by Robert L Kahn( Book )

3 editions published in 1964 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Survey of Working Conditions, 1969-1970 by Robert P Quinn( )

4 editions published between 1970 and 1984 in 3 languages and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study contains data on the working conditions of 1,533 workers in the United States in the period 1969-1970. Among the major aims of this survey were: (1) assessment of the frequency and severity of work-related problems experienced by employed people in general and by major demographic and occupational subgroups, (2) development of valid measures of job satisfaction suitable for use with samples of workers in heterogenous occupations and under a variety of conditions, (3) assessment of the impact of working conditions upon the well-being of workers, (4) establishment of baseline statistics that might permit subsequent national surveys in order to reveal any trends in the content areas originally investigated, and 5) establishment of normative statistics that might permit other investigators to compare their data from more limited sub-samples of workers with national norms. Respondents were asked questions about many facets of their job situations and other areas of their lives that might be affected by their jobs. They were also asked a series of questions regarding their job expectations and if these expectations were met at their actual jobs. Additional questions probed respondents feelings about their relationship with their supervisors and their overall contentment with their jobs and with life in general. Also explored were areas such as workload, job tension, work difficulties, and age, race, and sex discrimination. The structured interview schedule contained both closed and open-ended questions. Many of the open-ended questions were directed at estimating the frequency and type of labor standards problems, such as those with unions, discrimination, physical working conditions, wages, and work schedules. Demographic variables provide information on age, sex, race, education, and income ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03507.xml
Quality of Employment Survey, 1972-1973 by Robert P Quinn( )

5 editions published between 1973 and 1984 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study contains data on the working conditions of 1,455 workers aged 16 and older who were working for pay for 20 or more hours per week in the United States in the period 1972-1973. This survey is the second undertaken by the investigators to provide an overview of working conditions in the American labor force. The aims of this survey and many of the questions that were asked were comparable to those of the related collection, SURVEY OF WORKING CONDITIONS, 1969-1970 (ICPSR 3507). Among the major aims of this survey were: (1) assessment of the frequency and severity of work-related problems experienced by employed people in general and by major demographic and occupational subgroups, (2) identification of major demographic or occupational groups that were most affected by these problems, (3) development of valid measures of job satisfaction suitable for use with samples of workers in heterogenous occupations and under a variety of conditions, (4) assessment of the impact of working conditions upon the well-being of workers, especially their physical and mental well-being, and (5) establishment of normative statistics that might permit other investigators to compare their data from more limited subsamples of workers with national norms. The major measures used in both surveys were the frequency and severity of labor standards problems, the quality of employment indicators that were shown to be predictors of job satisfaction, the job satisfaction indices themselves, and the ratings of important job facets. Respondents were asked questions about many facets of their job situations and other areas of their lives that might be affected by their jobs in order to assess the impact of work on them. Questions included job tension, security, physical health, job satisfaction, and financial well-being. A series of questions regarding job expectations we ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03510.xml
Effectiveness in work roles : employee responses to work environments by Robert P Quinn( Book )

9 editions published in 1977 in English and Undetermined and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A five-year study of effectiveness in work roles had four general objectives: (1) to assess associations between aspects of working conditions and indicators of employees' work role effectiveness; (2) to identify personal and situational characteristics that limit associations between working conditions and effectiveness; (3) to begin to map the statistical structure of associations among various classes of effectiveness measures; and (4) to assess the validity of effectiveness indicators when measured in different ways and tested against different causal factors. Major methodological findings were that information from different sources regarding working conditions and worker behavior is in agreement only for relatively unambiguous and external aspects of work. As the abstractness and, thus, potential ambiguity of a measure increase, assessments from workers, observers, and supervisors become increasingly liable to judgmental biases, such as the halo effect. Major substantive results include identification of stress effects upon worker attitudes and behaviors, including a withdrawal syndrome that begins with frequent absences and culminates in voluntary turnover. (Twenty-one chapters, each a self-contained paper including methodological information and citation of sources, comprise this final report. It is divided into two parts. Part I presents chapters on methodological topics including defining, measuring, and assessing the quality of employment, and assessing work environments with observational methods. Part II, employee responses to work environments, has three sections: work role stress and strain; motivation and rewards; and compatibility of work roles and life roles. A methodological appendix is available separately as CE 016 610.) (Author/JH)
1972-1973 Quality of employment survey : Winter 1972-1973 by Robert P Quinn( Book )

2 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Education and Job Satisfaction A Questionable Payoff by Robert P Quinn( Book )

7 editions published between 1975 and 1977 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The relationship between education and job satisfaction has not been sufficiently well documented to qualify as unquestionable. Published research on the subject either fails to adequately assess the influence of education on job satisfaction or is too occupationally and/or geographically limited to form the basis for generalization. To examine on a larger scale the association between education and job satisfaction, four national household surveys of the American work force conducted by the University of Michigan's Survey Research Center in 1969, 1971, and twice in 1973 were analyzed. One hypothesis was that in small occupationally homogeneous samples those with higher educational levels would be less satisfied than others. Regarding education and overall job satisfaction, no support was provided for assuming that job satisfaction increases with each advance in educational level attained. On the other hand, overall quality of employment was associated with educational level, but large increments in quality of employment occurred only at those points where educational credentials are conferred. Future work on the relationship should involve several types of secondary analyses: treating education operationally in terms of quality and type rather than simply level; identifying the contribution of education to the relative importance that workers assign to different aspects of their jobs; and accounting for modifications in individual aspirations throughout life. (JR)
What workers want : factor analyses of importance ratings of job facets by Robert P Quinn( )

2 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Facts and fictions about the American working woman by Joan E Crowley( Book )

3 editions published between 1973 and 1977 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A national survey of personal interviews with 539 working women and 993 working men, was intended to test the reliability of the following stereotypes about American women who work: (1) American women work just for pin money, (2) Women work only for economic reasons, (3) Women are more concerned with the social aspects of their jobs, (4) Women prefer not to take initiative on their jobs, (5) Women are more concerned with "extrinsic" job characteristics, (6) Women are less concerned with challenging work, and (7) Women are less concerned with advancement on their jobs. A review of previous occupational research revealed that sex differences affecting jobs are small in magnitude, with the only consistent difference being that women are more concerned with the social aspects of their jobs. The survey results indicated that about 40 percent of working women were not economically dependent on a male wage earner, that differences in early socialization of boys and girls explain many of the seeming sex differences in work attitudes, and that women show less desire for initiative on the job. Various tables present the data, which rank the importance of job characteristics to working men and women. A related finding was that the average underpayment to women was $3,458 annually as compared with equally qualified male workers. (Ag)
Survey of working conditions 1969-1970 [maskinläsbar datafil] by Robert P Quinn( )

3 editions published between 1975 and 1984 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study contains data on the working conditions of 1,533 workers in the United States in the period 1969-1970. Among the major aims of this survey were: (1) assessment of the frequency and severity of work-related problems experienced by employed people in general and by major demographic and occupational subgroups, (2) development of valid measures of job satisfaction suitable for use with samples of workers in heterogenous occupations and under a variety of conditions, (3) assessment of the impact of working conditions upon the well-being of workers, (4) establishment of baseline statistics that might permit subsequent national surveys in order to reveal any trends in the content areas originally investigated, and 5) establishment of normative statistics that might permit other investigators to compare their data from more limited sub-samples of workers with national norms. Respondents were asked questions about many facets of their job situations and other areas of their lives that might be affected by their jobs. They were also asked a series of questions regarding their job expectations and if these expectations were met at their actual jobs. Additional questions probed respondents feelings about their relationship with their supervisors and their overall contentment with their jobs and with life in general. Also explored were areas such as workload, job tension, work difficulties, and age, race, and sex discrimination. The structured interview schedule contained both closed and open-ended questions. Many of the open-ended questions were directed at estimating the frequency and type of labor standards problems, such as those with unions, discrimination, physical working conditions, wages, and work schedules. Demographic variables provide information on age, sex, race, education, and income ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03507.xml
 
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English (101)