WorldCat Identities

ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Overview
Works: 893 works in 1,722 publications in 1 language and 82,830 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education
ASHE-ERIC higher education report by Association for the Study of Higher Education( )

in English and held by 901 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

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The art and science of classroom assessment : the missing part of pedagogy by Susan M Brookhart( Book )

6 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 875 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Redesigning higher education : producing dramatic gains in student learning by Lion F Gardiner( Book )

7 editions published between 1994 and 1996 in English and held by 791 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This monograph reviews empirical studies on various aspects of higher education relating to the effectiveness of instruction in regard to four areas: curriculum, instruction, campus psychological climate, and academic advising. After an introduction, the first section describes the development of critical skills, how these skills develop, and the conditions believed necessary to produce them. The following four sections examine the four core areas central to student development and the contribution research suggests they now make to the development: (1) curriculum (methods, the intellectual climate of the classroom, students' involvement, effects of the curriculum); (2) instruction (classroom tests and grades); (3) the campus climate (integration into the campus community, commuter and part-time students, students involvement with faculty, and minority group members); and (4) academic advising (developmental advising, the necessity for training in advising, and evaluation, recognition, and reward of advising). The next three sections describe opportunities for dramatic gains in students' learning, examining evidence about the relative capacity of students to learn at a very high level; describing seven specific changes which can improve students' learning, and addressing issues of leadership, management, and professional development. The final section presents a vision and a challenge to develop a new kind of community on campus. (Contains approximately 650 references.) (DB)
Academic libraries : the changing knowledge centers of colleges and universities by Barbara B Moran( Book )

6 editions published between 1984 and 1985 in English and held by 790 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Academic advising for student success : a system of shared responsibility by Susan H Frost( Book )

6 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 748 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Learning styles : implications for improving educational practices by Charles S Claxton( Book )

7 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 721 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Creating learning centered classrooms : what does learning theory have to say? by Frances K Stage( Book )

6 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 707 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Faculty collaboration : enhancing the quality of scholarship and teaching by Ann E Austin( Book )

6 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 690 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Faculty collaboration has grown dramatically over the course of this century. Conventional stereotypes, which convey the image of professors conducting research in the isolation of a laboratory or teaching alone in front of a room of passive students, overlook important aspects of modern academic life. Many professors now do much of their work--teaching, conducting research, and writing--in partnership with colleagues. Faculty collaboration occurs in a variety of settings and takes different forms, depending on the nature of the collaborative team and the goals of its members. Essentially, faculty collaboration is a cooperative endeavor that involves common goals, coordinated effort, and outcomes or products for which the collaborators share responsibility and credit. Professors choose to work in concert with colleagues for numerous reasons. Many believe collaboration increases productivity, maintains motivation, and stimulates creativity and risk taking. It can maximize the use of limited resources and could enhance the quality of teaching and research. Sometimes complex problems accompany faculty collaboration, however, such as difficulty concerning evaluation and assigning credit for work produced in collaboration. Because of the increasing popularity of faculty collaboration and the complex questions it poses to higher education, the time is right for a comprehensive examination of this important topic
The academic administrator and the law : what every dean and department chair needs to know by J. Douglas Toma( Book )

8 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 678 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract from ERIC database describing version attached as PDF: This report examines the role of the college dean or department head in relation to legal issues in higher education. The first section offers principles of the law, the courts, and counsel. It addresses types of legal issues, internal and external sources of the law, deference to academic and behavioral decisions, the distinction between public and private institutions, the attorney-client relationship, pretrial and trial procedures, and individual or institutional liability. Section 2 covers the employment relationship with faculty and staff. It discusses foundations of the relationship between employer and employee, hiring and promotion decisions (equal protection and due process), conduct and misconduct on the job, and dismissal and retirement of faculty and staff. Student issues in the academic setting is the focus of section 3, which examines contract, consumerism, and citizenship; misconduct and discipline; admissions and access; students' records; expression, organizations, and publications; and institutional liability. The final section is about regulation and oversight in the school and department. Specifically addressed are copyrights, trademarks, and patent law; openness and disclosure; family and medical leave; research and teaching; taxation and fundraising; and accreditation. (Contains approximately 375 references.) (DB)
Taking teaching seriously : meeting the challenge of instructional improvement by Michael B Paulsen( Book )

5 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 672 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Successful faculty development and evaluation : the complete teaching portfolio by John P Murray( Book )

7 editions published between 1995 and 1997 in English and held by 670 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Collaborative peer review : the role of faculty in improving college teaching by Larry Keig( Book )

6 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 662 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Peer teaching : to teach is to learn twice by Neal Whitman( Book )

7 editions published between 1988 and 1990 in English and held by 642 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Measuring up : the promises and pitfalls of performance indicators in higher education by Gerald H Gaither( Book )

7 editions published between 1994 and 1997 in English and held by 641 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Benchmarking in higher education : adapting best practices to improve quality by Jeffrey W Alstete( Book )

8 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and held by 627 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Due process and higher education : a systemic approach to fair decision making by Ed Stevens( Book )

7 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 615 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Due process has become an important principle in higher education as a result of many new legal issues, including dismissals of students from campus, firings of staff members, faculty tenure and promotion, sexual harassment, discrimination, and substance abuse. This volume defines due process; explains when due process procedures are required; reviews expectations of the courts with respect to due process in higher education; examines how legal requirements for fair decision making differ for publicly-supported and private institutions; and analyzes the difference between the systemic approach to due process and other methods of due process in higher education. The introduction and the first section of the volume provide an overview of due process in higher education (literature, historical development, fundamental concepts, academic and disciplinary sanctions, and constitutional competence). The next section presents a systemic approach to due process in higher education; the discussion examines decision making in higher education, provides an overview of the systemic approach, and examines various approaches to substantive and procedural due process. A concluding section offers policy and practice recommendations for therapeutic application of due process. Appended are two case studies designed to teach about due process and provide a better understanding of the implementation of due process. (Contains approximately 135 references.) (CH) Note:The following two links are not-applicable for text-based browsers or screen-reading software
Enacting diverse learning environments : improving the climate for racial/ethnic diversity in higher education( Book )

5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 615 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Making sense of administrative leadership : the 'L' word in higher education by Estela Mara Bensimon( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 601 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Enhancing student learning : intellectual, social, and emotional integration by Patrick Love( Book )

5 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 601 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The virtual campus : technology and reform in higher education by Gerald C Van Dusen( Book )

11 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 597 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The "virtual campus" is a metaphor for the electronic teaching, learning, and research environment created by the convergence of several relatively new technologies including, but not restricted to, the Internet, World Wide Web, computer-mediated communication, video conferencing, multi-media, groupware, video-on-demand, desktop publishing, intelligent tutoring systems, and virtual reality. The focus of this monograph is of necessity limited to changes occurring in higher education institutions that are committed to reform via technology. A survey of the literature finds reform characterized by changes in teaching, learning, research and scholarly activity, organizational culture, and governance and finance. Section 2 takes up teaching on the virtual campus and how institutional variables influence adoption of information technologies according to their particular missions and goals. Section 3, on classroom learning, contrasts traditional and virtual classrooms and describes the interface capabilities of various technologies. Section 4 explores recent reconceptualizations of scholarship as well as new computer-based technologies that are beginning to influence both the methods and substance of research. Section 5 depicts efforts to reform both the bureaucratic and academic spheres of higher education institutions by applying principles of Total Quality Management. Section 6 delineates some of the important new responsibilities of governing boards, including monitoring regulatory legislation, establishing a telecommunications policy, and shepherding resources for technology. The final section draws conclusions from the literature and makes recommendations for institutional planning and research. Specifically the seven conclusions are: (1) a paradigm shift can occur only in institutions committed to comprehensive reform; (2) attempts to change the classroom focus from "the sage on the stage" to collaborative learning are likely to fail without a substantial commitment to professional development; (3) higher education will continue to be market driven, requiring redoubled efforts to define academic productivity; (4) new constituencies appear to be well served by a variety of available distance learning venues; (5) the TQM movement has made impressive inroads in higher education administration; however, very little penetration has occurred when it most matters--on the academic side of the institution; (6) even as instructional use of technology rises, institutional support for applications development has been dilatory; and (7) the historic commitment to core values in traditional undergraduate education has wavered; the same vacillation threatens to undermine general education requirements in electronically delivered certificate and degree programs. Seven recommendations for beginning this process of integration include: (1) create a venue where key stakeholders can analyze major technology issues and purchases; (2) assert the value of technology-based learning from a variety of research perspectives; (3) establish quality standards for certificate and degree programs; (4) avoid pitting traditionalists against technology enthusiasts; (5) make "collaboration" and "cooperation," not "reengineering" and "restructuring" the new institutional buzz-words; (6) retain a strong commitment to adequate library staffing and funding; and (7) prepare for success by creating the necessary support structures. A glossary of terms is appended
 
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Learning styles : implications for improving educational practices
Covers
Redesigning higher education : producing dramatic gains in student learningAcademic advising for student success : a system of shared responsibilityLearning styles : implications for improving educational practicesCreating learning centered classrooms : what does learning theory have to say?Faculty collaboration : enhancing the quality of scholarship and teachingThe academic administrator and the law : what every dean and department chair needs to knowTaking teaching seriously : meeting the challenge of instructional improvementSuccessful faculty development and evaluation : the complete teaching portfolio
Alternative Names
Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Clearinghouse on Higher Education, ERIC

Clearinghouse on Higher Education (George Washington University)

Educational Research Information Center Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Educational Research Information Center Washington, DC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Educational Resources Information Center Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Educational Resources Information Center (Spojené státy americké) Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Educational Resources Information Center (U.S.) Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Educational Resources Information Center (U.S.) ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Educational Resources Information Center Washington, DC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

ERIC/HE

George Washington University Clearinghouse on Higher Education

George Washington University ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

George Washington University Washington, DC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

George Washington University Washington, DC ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education

Languages
English (138)