WorldCat Identities

Robinson, Sherman

Overview
Works: 273 works in 573 publications in 2 languages and 4,653 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Author, Other, Honoree, Redactor, Editor
Classifications: HD82, 338.9
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Sherman Robinson
WTO negotiations and agricultural trade liberalization : the effect of developed countries' policies on developing countries by Eugenio Díaz-Bonilla( )

17 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 753 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"WTO Negotiations and Agricultural Trade Liberalization arises from a joint project between the Food and Resource Economics Institute in Denmark and the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington. It analyses the effects of developed countries' agricultural policies on developing countries. The project addressed the main issues raised by groups debating trade and development issues (which include developing countries' governments, politicians, farmers' organizations, NGOs, trade specialists and development specialists) by applying quantitative techniques. The main focus is on food security, poverty and other topics such as multifunctionality, biotechnology and regional agreements, as an input to policy reform within the World Trade Organization (WTO) trade negotiations. The results have been presented in a way that is usable by interested parties in developing countries. This book will be of significant interest to those researching and working in agricultural economics, development studies and law."--Jacket
Industrialization and growth : a comparative study by Hollis Burnley Chenery( Book )

28 editions published between 1986 and 1989 in English and Chinese and held by 661 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Income distribution policy in developing countries : a case study of Korea by Irma Adelman( Book )

25 editions published in 1978 in English and Undetermined and held by 573 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How much can actually be done to improve the distribution of income in developing countries? In seeking an answer to this question, the authors have developed a dynamic computable general equilibrium model that provides a laboratory for investigating the potential impact of various policy instruments and programs intended to improve the relative and absolute incomes of the poor. The model is rooted in an actual economy - that of the Republic of Korea
General equilibrium models for development policy by Kemal Derviş( Book )

34 editions published between 1981 and 1989 in English and Undetermined and held by 493 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Linear models; Computable general equilibrium models; Trade policy and resource allocation: a quantitative analysis; Trade policy, growth, and industrial strategy: Turkey, 1973-1985; income distribution and multisector planning models
The USDA/ERS Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model of the United States by Sherman Robinson( Book )

3 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Trade adjustment policies and income distribution in three archetype developing economies by Jaime De Melo( Book )

18 editions published between 1980 and 1984 in English and Undetermined and held by 139 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sectoral effects of a world oil price shock : economywide linkages to the agricultural sector by Kenneth Hanson( Book )

4 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 138 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Data, linkages, and models : U.S. national income and product accounts in the framework of a social accounting matrix by Kenneth Hanson( Book )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. adjustment in the 1990's : a CGE analysis of alternative trade strategies by Kenneth Hanson( Book )

4 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Partners or predators? : the impact of regional trade liberalization on Indonesia by Jeffrey D Lewis( Book )

8 editions published between 1996 and 1999 in English and held by 109 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

July 1996 The authors empirically assess regional integration and liberalization scenarios impact on Indonesia and other Pacific Rim economies, including the complete Uruguay Round, further global liberalization and the creation of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) or Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) free trade areas. They consider how major international exchange rate realignments affect the world trade pattern, and Indonesia in particular. The analysis uses a multi-country, computable general equilibrium (CGE) model to quantify the trade liberalization impact on countries, sectors, and factors. The extended APEC-CGE model consists of nine linked country models: Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore (together), the Philippines, Thailand, China (including Hong Kong), Korea and Taiwan, Japan, the United States and the European Union. Each country model is linked through explicit bilateral trade flows modeling for each traded sector. The empirical results lead to several conclusions: a) eliminating tariff and non tariff barriers in industrial countries (especially the Multifibre Agreement) gives Asian developing countries the opportunity to expand exports and achieve productivity gains; b) creation of an APEC free trade area gives participants significant benefits, with little effect on nonmembers while creation of an ASEAN free trade area gives its members little benefit, thus ASEAN countries should work toward more liberalization under GATT or hasten the APEC free trade area creation; c) all economies gain the most from further multilateral liberalization; and d) major exchange rate realignments significantly affect bilateral trade balances and world trade volume and direction. However, they have less effect than trade liberalization on the internal production and trade structure. Sectoral protection and subsidy rates vary greatly and their elimination yields significant efficiency gains. Changes in exchange rates have less effect
A general equilibrium analysis of foreign exchange shortages in a developing economy by Kemal Derviş( Book )

15 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economywide implications of agricultural liberalization in the United States by Maureen Kilkenny( Book )

4 editions published between 1990 and 1992 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The social impact of a WTO agreement in Indonesia by Anne-Sophie Robilliard( )

6 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Indonesia experienced rapid growth and the expansion of the formal financial sector during the last quarter of the 20th century. Although this tendency was reversed by the shock of the financial crisis that spread throughout Asia in 1997 and 1998, macroeconomic stability has since then been restored, and poverty has been reduced to pre-crisis levels. Poverty reduction remains nevertheless a critical challenge for Indonesia with over 110 million people (53 percent of the population) living on less than $2 a day. The objective of this study is to help identify ways in which the Doha Development Agenda might contribute to further poverty reduction in Indonesia. To provide a good technical basis for answering this question, the authors use an approach that combines a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with a microsimulation model. This framework is designed to capture important channels through which macroeconomic shocks affect household incomes. It allows making recommendations on specific trade reform options as well as on complementary development policy reforms. The framework presented in this study generates detailed poverty outcomes of trade shocks. Given the magnitude of the shocks examined here and the structural features of the Indonesian economy, only the full liberalization scenario generates significant poverty changes. The authors examine their impact under alternative specifications of the functioning of labor markets. These alternative assumptions generate different results, all of which confirm that the impact of full liberalization on poverty would be beneficial, with wage and employment gains dominating the adverse food price changes that could hurt the poorest households. Two alternative tax replacement schemes are examined. While direct tax replacement appears to be more desirable in terms of efficiency gains and translates into higher poverty reduction, political and practical considerations could lead the Government of Indonesia to choose a replacement scheme through the adjustment of value-added tax rates across nonexempt sectors
Beyond the Uruguay Round : the implications of an Asian free trade area by Jeffrey D Lewis( )

11 editions published between 1995 and 1999 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

June 1995 The Pacific Rim members of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) group have different views about the role each should play in fostering further trade liberalization. But at the November 1994 APEC meetings in Bogor they committed themselves to forming an APEC free trade area. The authors explore: 1) the impact of such a free trade area on trade, welfare, and economic structure of the Pacific Rim economies and the European Union; 2) the implications of forming a partial free trade area, excluding such potential partners as China, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) economies, or the United States; 3) whether an APEC free trade area provides more benefits than full trade liberalization that includes the European Union. They analyze these issues using a multicountry, computable general equilibrium model to simulate alternative liberalized trade scenarios. Their findings are as follows. Under the base-case scenario (in which all tariff and most nontariff barriers are removed among the APEC countries, China, Japan, ASEAN, the Asian newly industrializing economies (NIEs), and the United States): all APEC countries gain in GDP and the excluded European Union loses sligthly. Gains are greatest for the poorer countries, for whom trade externalities are more significant. Trade expands greatly, and although there is some trade diversion away from the European Union and the rest of the world, that is swamped by the creation of trade within the free trade area. The U.S.-Japan trade balance improves only slightly (by $1.4 billion), and the U.S.-China balance are much larger, suggesting that changes in sectoral protection make movements in particular bilateral trade balances nearly impossible to predict. When one economy is excluded: there are gains from making the free trade area as broad as possible. Omitting any one region (China, the United States, or the ASEAN 4) makes that region significantly worse off and lowers the gains for all other members as well. The Asian NIEs have the most to gain from broad membership. Excluding China reduces Asian NIE gains by about half, and excluding the United States yields even greater declines. Excluding the United States has the worst impact on all other potential members, greater than the effect of omitting China or the ASEAN 4. The European Union is largely unaffected by different versions of the APEC free trade area. Global (versus regional) liberalization: global liberalization that includes the European Union is the best outcome in terms of world GDP and welfare. And all countries gain more from global liberalization than they do from joining an APEC free trade area alone. Forming a regional free trade area may be politically easier than continued global liberalization, but there are economic incentives for all parties to expand on the completed GATT round
Aid, growth and real exchange rate dynamics by Shantayanan Devarajan( )

3 editions published between 2008 and 2012 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Devarajan, Go, Page, Robinson, and Thierfelder argued that if aid is about the future and recipients are able to plan consumption and investment decisions optimally over time, then the potential problem of an aid-induced appreciation of the real exchange rate (Dutch disease) does not occur. In their paper, "Aid, Growth and Real Exchange Rate Dynamics," this key result is derived without requiring extreme assumptions or additional productivity story. The economic framework is a standard neoclassical growth model, based on the familiar Salter-Swan characterization of an open economy, with full dynamic savings and investment decisions. It does require that the model is fully dynamic in both savings and investment decisions. An important assumption is that aid should be predictable for intertemporal smoothing to take place. If aid volatility forces recipients to be constrained and myopic, Dutch disease problems become an issue
The social impact of a WTO agreement in Indonesia by Anne-Sophie Robilliard( )

2 editions published between 2005 and 2012 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Indonesia experienced rapid growth and the expansion of the formal financial sector during the last quarter of the 20th century. Although this tendency was reversed by the shock of the financial crisis that spread throughout Asia in 1997 and 1998, macroeconomic stability has since then been restored, and poverty has been reduced to pre-crisis levels. Poverty reduction remains nevertheless a critical challenge for Indonesia with over 110 million people (53 percent of the population) living on less than
Economy-wide and distributional impacts of an oil price shock on the South African economy by B Essama-Nssah( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: As crude oil prices reach new highs, there is renewed concern about how external shocks will affect growth and poverty in developing countries. This paper describes a macro-micro framework for examining the structural and distributional consequences of a significant external shock-an increase in the world price of oil-on the South African economy. The authors merge results from a highly disaggregative computable general equilibrium model and a micro-simulation analysis of earnings and occupational choice based on socio-demographic characteristics of the household. The model provides changes in employment, wages, and prices that are used in the micro-simulation. The analysis finds that a 125 percent increase in the price of crude oil and refined petroleum reduces employment and GDP by approximately 2 percent, and reduces household consumption by approximately 7 percent. The oil price shock tends to increase the disparity between rich and poor. The adverse impact of the oil price shock is felt by the poorer segment of the formal labor market in the form of declining wages and increased unemployment. Unemployment hits mostly low and medium-skilled workers in the services sector. High-skilled households, on average, gain from the oil price shock. Their income rises and their spending basket is less skewed toward food and other goods that are most affected by changes in oil prices
Beyond the Uruguay Round the implications of an Asian Free Trade Area by Jeffrey D Lewis( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The foreign exchange gap, growth and industrial strategy in Turkey, 1973-1983 by Kemal Derviş( Book )

5 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Productivity and externalities : models of export-led growth by Jaime De Melo( Book )

16 editions published between 1989 and 1991 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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WTO negotiations and agricultural trade liberalization : the effect of developed countries' policies on developing countries
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