WorldCat Identities

Hittleman, Daniel R.

Overview
Works: 20 works in 61 publications in 2 languages and 1,760 library holdings
Genres: Juvenile works  Poetry  Abstracts 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Daniel R Hittleman
Interpreting educational research : an introduction for consumers of research by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

16 editions published between 1992 and 2006 in 3 languages and held by 718 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Developmental reading : a psycholinguistic perspective by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

14 editions published between 1978 and 1979 in English and held by 332 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A grand celebration : grandparents in poetry( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 273 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Poems in celebration of grandparents
Developmental reading, K-8 : teaching from a whole-language perspective by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

3 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 213 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Developmental reading, K-8 : teaching from a psycholinguistic perspective by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

5 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Developmental reading : a psycholinguistic perspective ; instructor's manual by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The readability of subject matter material re-written on the basis of students' oral reading miscues by Daniel R Hittleman( )

1 edition published in 1971 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Silent participants : understanding students' nonoral responses by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Silent students are often actively involved in classroom learning despite appearances to the contrary, and teachers can use special instructional strategies to guide them to overt participation. Students with "communication apprehension" are often assumed to have low intelligence, but they may suffer instead from shyness, various communication skills deficits, social alienation, or low social esteem. The educational handicap of silence stemming from causes other than low intelligence can be overcome when teachers use the following teaching strategies to guide silent participants into speech: (1) engage the students in a study of the functions of silence as part of language; (2) develop alternative ways to obtain student responses; (3) establish routines by which silent students can indicate readiness to answer or the need for clarification; and (4) develop student collaborations and communities of learning. (MHC)
Determining the Readability of Instructional Material by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

3 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Suggestions are presented in this paper to aid in the effective selection of instructional materials appropriate to the reading levels of the students who will use them. Formulas designed to predict the readability of material are discussed. The cloze procedure, which attempts to measure, for individuals, the difficulty of text, is recommended for use with instructional materials. Caution is suggested in the use of the traditional five-word deletion pattern in the case of scientific material. Alternatives to the correct-word requirement include clozentropy, a procedure whereby a reader's responses are compared against all responses placed in the blanks by a criterion group. Mkm)
Interpreting educational research : an introduction for consumers of research by Daniel R Hittleman( Recording )

2 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This [book] can be used in introductory, postbaccalaureate research courses that prepare people as consumers rather than as producers of educational research. Such people include elementary and early childhood education teachers, reading/literacy specialists, special education teachers, content-area teachers at the middle and secondary school levels, administrators, and curriculum specialists ... The text is organized into eleven chapters and two appendixes. In chapters 1,2,3, [the authors] lead the reader to an understanding of theoretical perspectives underpinning both quantitative and qualitative research, research designs, research, research designs, research methods and methodology, the general procedures of research producers, and a plan for reading research reports. In chapters 4 through 9, [they] present extended discussions of the aspects of design and methodology and illustrations of the manner in which research producers present these aspects in research report. In chaptes 10 and 11, [they] provide information about reading and writing reviews of research and about sources for locating research reports. At the end of the book are a glossary of key terms, citations of model research studies and both syntheses and meta-analyses of research in print and online sources, and ethical standards for conducting educational and program evaluation research.-Pref
Final Report of an Evaluation of the Corrective Reading Services in Non Public Schools, July 1972 by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The New York City Board of Education under Title I of the Elementary Secondary Education Act has instituted a program of special corrective reading services for disadvantaged children in nonpublic schools. Under the program, the Board of Education through its Division of Funded Programs, Office of esea Title I Programs for the Non-public Schools, recruits, selects, trains, and assigns licensed teachers to eligible non-public schools in order to improve the reading achievement of children who have been identified as having reading problems. During the 1971-72 school year, the program is in its sixth full year of operation, encompasses 172 schools serving 8297 children, and is staffed by 41 full-time and 120 part-time corrective reading teachers. The Corrective Reading Services Program was developed to provide elementary and secondary school students with three basic activities in small group settings: (a) verbal discussions geared to develop and enrich a basic meaning vocabulary; (b) word analysis activities geared to develop independence in decoding; and, (c) guided and independent reading activities geared to develop ability to comprehend written materials. This final report includes an evaluation of the program's implementation, an assessment of the program's effectiveness, and an evaluation of the program by the professional staff and parents who participated in the program. (Author/JM)
Adaptive Assessment for Nonacademic Secondary Reading by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Adaptive assessment procedures are a means of determining the quality of a reader's performance in a variety of reading situations and on a variety of written materials. Such procedures are consistent with the idea that there are functional competencies which change with the reading task. Adaptive assessment takes into account that a lack of communication between author and reader may result from the reader's lack of knowledge or strategies for reconstructing the message or from the author's use of a style that is unfamiliar to the reader. Through an analysis of miscues--oral reading responses that deviate from the expected responses--it is possible to examine a reader's ability to reconstruct an author's message. A good way to clarify the idea of functional competency is to examine various types of reading materials encountered by high school students, including narrative writing, expository writing, and job-related reading materials. Job-related reading tasks have their own specific readability factors. To determine a student's ability to read in job-related situtations, a teacher may sample the person's reading of such materials as help-wanted advertisements, application forms, and typical business invoices. (Gw)
Readability of High School Text Passages Before and After Revision. Final Report by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether high school subject matter text which was revised on the basis of secondary school students' oral reading miscues that result in grammatical re-transformations had greater readability than the original text. The subjects, 217 students, were randomly selected and were assigned to stanine levels based on the results of the comprehension part of the Diagnostic Reading Test, Survey Section, Upper Level, Form B. a stratified subsample of 23 subjects was then selected to orally read the subject matter passages. The readings were tape recorded. The miscues were transcribed onto worksheets and analyzed according to the procedures of the Reading Miscue Inventory. An additional group of 96 ninth graders matched to the descriptive phase sample on Diagnostic Reading Test scores were randomly assigned to take one of the readability tests. Some of the conclusions indicated that (1) the oral reading of the students demonstrated that they attempted to read just the syntactical patterns of the subject matter passages in order to gain meaning and (2) the analysis of miscues revealed portions which were confusing and/or ambiguous. (Author/WR)
Grandparents and Grandchildren in Children's Literature Interactions That Enhance Learning by Carol G Hittleman( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper focuses on how social studies content and concepts can be explored through literature in which grandparents and grandchildren interact. The paper emphasizes that, through the intergenerational relationship, children can encounter and explore life in general, increasing their understanding of their own portion of the world and of themselves. The paper offers models for developing thematic units in primary, intermediate, and middle school grades, and the evaluation of literature selections, which includes six broad and overlapping purposes; (1) experiencing the "grand" relationship; (2) learning family stories; (3) preserving memories; (4) understanding intergenerational differences; (5) transmitting history; and (6) acquiring family and general culture; and includes a list of suggested book titles. The paper presents ways of integrating curricula and organizing instruction in these thematic units and lists the components of a typical unit: theme, content, concepts, literature, literature responses, literature strategies, and technology. The paper offers further guidelines to consider when selecting literature for use in social studies and language arts instruction: accuracy and authenticity; accuracy and truth; content and perspective; and style, organization, illustrations, and format. (Contains 4 figures on thematic units and 11 references; also contains 23 literature titles and 8 software titles.) (CR)
A Work-Related Functional Literacy Program. Final Report by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To provide instruction in work-related reading, writing, and mathematical computation, Jobs for Youth established a Right-to-Read Reading Academy. Program objectives were (1) to develop and expand work-related instructional tasks, competency pre- and post-tests, and work-related curriculum and (2) to provide service in this area for out-of-school, out-of-work youth with poor basic and job-related skills in New York City. Jobs for Youth's association with the public and private sectors of educational institutions and industry, community involvement, and qualified staff benefited the reading academy program. The program provided such retention incentives as stipends and job placement for participants recruited primarily through referrals. The Reading Academy project was incorporated into an educational services component of Jobs for Youth. Other components were employer services, counseling, and operations. Designed to equip youth with the functional competencies needed to make the transition to work, educational services used a competency-based curriculum to ensure a match between "academic" skills (education) and actual job demands (work). In a laboratory setting both commercial and "homemade" materials were used. Evaluation processes involved student assessment, formative program assessment, and summative evaluation. (Ylb)
Metaphor The Heart of Reading and Writing by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As human understanding is largely metaphorical, what metaphor is, how children use it, and how they can be taught to use it more effectively are important educational concerns. A direct or indirect comparison between two apparently unlike things, metaphor consists of a topic, a vehicle of comparison, and ground--or traits--linking the topic and the vehicle. When the metaphor is interpreted, tension created by the comparison is resolved. A metaphor may be either context independent (a part sentence metaphor that is meaningless when interpreted literally) or context dependent (a whole sentence metaphor that may have a literal meaning in another context). Metaphors are evident in children's earliest speech and increase in frequency until the early elementary school years. With adolescence, metaphor usage again increases. Children's success at interpreting a metaphor seems to depend on the developmental cognitive stage controlling their thinking. First basing comparisons on physical similarities, children gradually begin to compare psychological and abstract qualities. Instructional procedures for developing student skill with metaphors include naming and classifying exercises, work with situational ambiguities, use of metonymy, and attention to the affect that a word's function in a sentence has on its meaning. (MM)
A Model for a Competency Based Teacher Preparation Program. Teacher Education Forum Volume 4, Number 12 by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Some of the merits and limitations of Competency Based Teacher Education (CBTE) programs are reviewed, and a model CBTE program is presented. The model CBTE program is the primary concern of this discussion; however, arguments are mentioned for and against other such programs to give perspective to the components chosen for inclusion in the model program. Based upon current evidence, it seems that a major weakness of many CBTE programs may be that they seek to establish a singular, univariate examination of teacher performance and an isolated, oversimplified explanation of the learning situation. The model CBTE program, therefore, is developed so that the interaction of a number of variables which influence the teaching/learning situation can be observed. It takes into account the facts that teaching performance is a complex of knowledge and teaching skills extending over a long period of time and that teaching performance can only be adequately and effectively assessed by multiple and multileveled observations over an extended period. Presented here, the Multiple Measure Model of Teacher Performance is an attempt to measure the same goal or objective by different techniques and under varying circumstances. The multiple measure approach utilizes various learning objectives (cognitive, performance, consequence, affective, and exploratory), and the criteria for performance can be derived from these objectives. In addition, the approach allows for the assessment of a single objective in two dimensions--the learning condition and the learner response. (MM)
Instructor's manual : Developmental reading, K-8 : teaching from a psycholinguistic perspective by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A model for a competency based teacher preparation program by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Interpreting Educational Research: An Introduction for Consumers ofResearch. Second Edition by Daniel R Hittleman( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This volume is intended for use in introductory research courses in which elementary and early childhood teachers, reading specialists, special education teachers, and content area teachers at the middle and secondary school levels are prepared as consumers of educational research rather than producers of educational research. The text provides basic knowledge and skills for reading, interpreting, and evaluating both quantitative and qualitative educational research for instructional decision making. The chapters are: (1) "The Research Process"; (2) "Research Designs"; (3) "Reading and Evaluating Research Reports"; (4) "Reading and Evaluating Introductory Sections: Abstract, Background, and Purpose"; (5) "Reading and Evaluating Subject Sections"; (6) "Reading and Evaluating Instrument Sections"; (7) "Reading and Evaluating Procedure Sections"; (8) "Reading and Interpreting Results Sections"; (9) "Reading and Evaluating Discussion Sections"; (10) "Reading and Interpreting Reviews of Research"; and (11) "Locating Information about Research Reports." Appendixes contain a glossary, research reports and reviews for analysis, and the ethical standards of the American Educational Research Association. (Contains 26 figures, 7 tables, and 186 references.) (Sld)
 
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A grand celebration : grandparents in poetry
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A grand celebration : grandparents in poetry
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English (59)

German (1)