WorldCat Identities

James, Henry 1811-1882

Overview
Works: 280 works in 639 publications in 3 languages and 18,175 library holdings
Genres: Fiction  Psychological fiction  Short stories  Periodicals  History  Biography  Biographies  Records and correspondence  Reviews  Novels 
Roles: Author, Creator, Editor
Classifications: PS2116, 813.4
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Henry James
 
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Most widely held works by Henry James
A treasury of short stories : favorites of the past hundred years from Turgenev to Thurber, from Balzac to Hemingway ; with biographical sketches of the authors by Bernardine Kielty( Book )

1 edition published in 1947 in English and held by 1,482 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The death of Ivan IIyich; a day in the country, two little soldiers; Quattrocentisteria; the secret sharer; the pace of youth; the coming-out of Maggie; the voice in the night; the old hunter; the doll's house; Babylon Revistied; a telephone call
The ambassadors by Henry James( )

3 editions published between 1996 and 1998 in English and held by 1,031 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A fiftyish American is dispatched to Europe by a rich widow on a mission to bring back her wayward son who is enraptured by a French woman
Henry James, Senior: a selection of his writings by Henry James( Book )

9 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 612 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The social significance of our institutions : an oration delivered by request of the citizens at Newport, R.I., July 4th, 1861 by Henry James( Book )

19 editions published between 1861 and 1976 in English and held by 409 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Substance and shadow: or, Morality and religion in their relation to life: an essay upon the physics of of creation by Henry James( )

17 editions published between 1863 and 1983 in English and held by 403 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The leading words of my title page call for a precise definition, in order that the reader may clearly discern the aim of the discussion to which I invite his attention. By morality I mean that sentiment of selfhood or property which every man not an idiot feels in his own body. It is a state of conscious freedom or rationality, exempting him from the further control of parents or guardians, and entitling him in his own estimation and that of his fellows, to the undivided ownership of his words and deeds. It is the basis of conscience in man, or what enables him to appropriate good and evil to himself, instead of ascribing the former as he may one day learn to do exclusively to celestial, the latter exclusively to infernal influence. The word is often viciously used as a synonyme of spiritual goodness, as when we say, "A is a very moral man, " meaning a just one; or, "B is a very immoral man, " meaning an unjust one. No man can be either good or evil, either just or unjust, but by virtue of his morality; i. e. unless he have selfhood or freedom entitling him to own his action. This is a conditio sine qua non. The action by which he majority or manhood, what every man, as man, possesses in common with every other man. By religion I mean -- what is invariably meant by the term where the thing itself still exists -- such a conscience on man's part of a forfeiture of the Divine favor, as perpetually urges him to make sacrifices of his ease, his convenience, his wealth, and if need be his life, in order to restore himself, if so it be possible, to that favor. This is religion in its literal form; natural religion; religion as it stands authenticated by the universal instincts of the race, before it has undergone a spiritual conversion into life, and while claiming still a purely ritual embodiment It is however in this gross form the germ of all humane culture. Accordingly we sometimes use the term in an accommodated sense, i. e. to express the spiritual results with which religion is fraught rather than the mere carnal embodiment it first of all offers to such results. Thus the apostle James says: Pure and undefiled religion (i. e., religion viewed no longer as a letter, but as a spirit), is to visit the fatherless and the widow, and keep oneself unspotted from the world (i. e., has exclusive reference to the life). We also say proverbially, handsome is that handsome does; not meaning of course to stretch the word handsome out of its literal dimensions, but only by an intelligible metonomy of body for soul, or what is natural for what is spiritual, to express in a compendious way the superiority of moral to physical beauty. My reader will always understand me, then, as using the word religion in its strictly literal signification, to indicate our ritual or ceremonious homage to the Divine name. Now morality and religion, thus interpreted, are regarded on my title page as concurring to promote the evolution of man's spiritual destiny on earth"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Love, marriage, and divorce, and the sovereignty of the individual : a discussion between Henry James, Horace Greeley and Stephen Pearl Andrews ; and a hitherto unpublished manuscript, Love, marriage, and the condition of woman by Stephen Pearl Andrews( )

20 editions published between 1853 and 1990 in English and held by 320 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This work evolved out of a public debate between Andrews and Greeley over their difference of opinion on the concept and legal framework of marriage
The secret of Swedenborg : being an elucidation of his doctrine of the divine natural humanity by Henry James( Book )

13 editions published between 1869 and 1983 in English and held by 298 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Moralism and Christianity : or, Man's experience and destiny. In three lectures by Henry James( Book )

10 editions published between 1850 and 1983 in English and held by 264 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The nature of evil : considered in a letter to the Rev. Edward Beecher, D.D. by Henry James( )

5 editions published between 1855 and 2010 in English and held by 254 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The literary remains of the late Henry James by Henry James( Book )

17 editions published between 1884 and 2016 in English and held by 228 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What is presented by the author's brother is a collection of essays and recollections, some finished, some not, that were left behind after Henry James died. A long introduction and preface seek to explain the origin of his brother's thoughts, circumstances and why he wrote
Christianity : the logic of creation by Henry James( Book )

9 editions published between 1857 and 1983 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The literary remains of Henry James by Henry James( Book )

3 editions published in 1970 in English and Undetermined and held by 176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lectures and miscellanies by Henry James( Book )

10 editions published between 1852 and 2012 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What constitutes the state? : [a lecture delivered before the young Men's Association of the City of Albany] by Henry James( Book )

10 editions published between 1846 and 1983 in English and held by 172 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The nature of evil : considered in a letter to the Rev. Edward Beecher, D.D. author of "The Conflict of Ages" by Henry James( Book )

6 editions published in 1855 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Massachusetts quarterly review( )

in English and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

J.R. Lowell's review of Thoreau's A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers is in v. 3, p. 40-51 (Dec. 1849)
The church of Christ not an ecclesiasticism by Henry James( Book )

6 editions published between 1854 and 1983 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Morality and the perfect life by Henry James( Book )

6 editions published between 1906 and 1983 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The nature of evil by Henry James( Book )

6 editions published between 1900 and 2012 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tracts for the new times by Henry James( Book )

3 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.32 (from 0.04 for Henry Jame ... to 0.72 for Philosophy ...)

The ambassadors
Alternative Names
Henry James

Henry James sr. Amerikaans theoloog (1811-1882)

Henry James starejši

James, Henry Senior 1811-1882

James, Henry, Sr

James, Henry Sr. 1811-1882

James Sr. Henry 1811-1882

Tzaiems, Chenre, 1811-1882

Χένρι Τζέιμς ο πρεσβύτερος

Հենրի Ջեյմս

ჰენტი ჯეიმზ უფროსი

ヘンリー・ジェームズ・シニア

Languages
English (310)

French (2)

Dutch (1)

Covers
The nature of evil : considered in a letter to the Rev. Edward Beecher, D.D. author of "The Conflict of Ages"The James family : including selections from the writings of Henry James, Senior, William, Henry & Alice JamesThe Jameses : a family narrativeNotes of a son and brother / by Henry JamesThe nature of true virtue : theology, psychology, and politics in the writings of Henry James, Sr., Henry James, Jr., and William JamesThe father : a life of Henry James, Sr.Henry James : fiction as history