WorldCat Identities

Reid, John Phillip

Overview
Works: 58 works in 264 publications in 1 language and 14,860 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography 
Roles: Author, Honoree
Classifications: KF4541, 340.09744
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about John Phillip Reid
 
Most widely held works by John Phillip Reid
A law of blood; the primitive law of the Cherokee nation by John Phillip Reid( Book )

10 editions published between 1970 and 2006 in English and Undetermined and held by 887 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

By the time of the first European contact, the Cherokee Nation had already developed a sophisticated government which embodied a belief in liberty and equality as well as a system of laws regarding murder, property, marriage, warfare, and international relations. This work explores the relationship between the members of the tribe and their law
The concept of liberty in the age of the American Revolution by John Phillip Reid( Book )

7 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 815 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In defiance of the law : the standing-army controversy, the two Constitutions, and the coming of the American Revolution by John Phillip Reid( Book )

8 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 690 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In a defiant stance : the conditions of law in Massachusetts Bay, the Irish comparison ; and the coming of the American Revolution by John Phillip Reid( Book )

7 editions published between 1977 and 1990 in English and Undetermined and held by 646 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The minimum of violence accompanying the success of the American Revolution resulted in large part, argues this book, from the conditions of law the British allowed in the American colonies. By contrast, Ireland's struggle for independence was prolonged, bloody, and bitter largely because of the repressive conditions of law imposed by Britain. Examining the most rebellious American colony, Massachusetts Bay, Professor Reid finds that law was locally controlled while imperial law was almost nonexistent as an influence on the daily lives of individuals. In Ireland, the same English common law, because of imperial control of legal machinery, produced an opposite result. The Irish were forced to resort to secret, underground violence. The author examines various Massachusetts Bay institutions to show the consequences of whig party control, in contrast to the situation in 18th-century Ireland. A general conclusion is that law, the conditions of positive law, and the matter of who controls the law may have more significant effects on the course of events than is generally assumed
The concept of representation in the age of the American Revolution by John Phillip Reid( Book )

9 editions published between 1989 and 1998 in English and held by 628 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A better kind of hatchet : law, trade, and diplomacy in the Cherokee nation during the early years of European contact by John Phillip Reid( Book )

12 editions published between 1975 and 1976 in English and Undetermined and held by 595 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chief Justice : the judicial world of Charles Doe by John Phillip Reid( Book )

13 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 589 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Roscoe Pound has called Charles Doe (1830-1896) one of the ten greatest jurists in American history, the "one judge upon the bench of a state court who stands out as a builder of the law since the Civil War." This is the first booklength biography of Chief Justice Doe, and as an examination of the constitutional and jurisprudential theories of a state judge it is probably unique
Law for the elephant : property and social behavior on the Overland Trail by John Phillip Reid( Book )

8 editions published between 1980 and 1997 in English and held by 550 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The briefs of the American Revolution : constitutional arguments between Thomas Hutchinson, Governor of Massachusetts Bay, and James Bowdoin for the Council and John Adams for the House of Representatives by Massachusetts( Book )

7 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 479 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The version of the arguments followed in this text is that of the pamphlet edition of 1773 sold by the editors of the Boston Gazette with the title : "The speeches of His Excellency Governor Hutchinson to the general assembly of the Massachusetts-Bay at a session begun and held on the sixth of January, 1773"
Constitutional history of the American Revolution by John Phillip Reid( Book )

28 editions published between 1986 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 453 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

John Phillip Reid addresses the central constitutional issues that divided the American colonists from their English legislators: the authority to tax, the authority to legislate, the security of rights, the nature of law, the foundation of constitutional government in custom and contractarian theory, and the search for a constitutional settlement
In a rebellious spirit : the argument of facts, the Liberty Riot, and the coming of the American Revolution by John Phillip Reid( Book )

7 editions published between 1978 and 1979 in English and Undetermined and held by 441 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A fresh view of the legal arguments leading to the American Revolution, this book argues that rebellious acts called "lawless" mob action by British authorities were sanctioned by "whig law" in the eyes of the colonists. Professor Reid also holds that leading historians have been misled by taking both sides' forensic statements at face value. The focus is on three events. First was the Malcom Affair (1766), when a Boston merchant and his friends faced down a sheriff's party seeking smuggled goods, arguing that the search warrant was invalid. Second was a parade in Boston to celebrate the second anniversary (1768) of the repeal of the Stamp Act-an occasion when some revenue officials were hanged in effigy. Third was the Liberty "riot" (1768), when customs officers boarded John Hancock's ship and were carried off by a crowd including the aforementioned Malcom. Legal inquires into the three events were marked by hyperbole on both sides. Whigs depicted Crown officials as lawless trespassers serving a foreign tyrant. Tories painted the Sons of Liberty as lawless mobs of almost savage ferocity. Both sides, as the author shows, had extralegal motives: whigs to enlist supporters in the other colonies for the cause of independence; tories to bring British troops and warships to Massachusetts in support of the status quo. Both succeeded in their polemical aims, and both have gulled most historians
The literature of American legal history by William E Nelson( Book )

11 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 401 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Constitutional history of the American Revolution by John Phillip Reid( Book )

22 editions published between 1986 and 2003 in English and held by 397 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Designed for use in courses, this abridged edition of the four-volume Constitutional History of the American Revolution demonstrates how significant constitutional disputes were in instigating the American Revolution. John Phillip Reid addresses the central constitutional issues that divided the American colonists from their English legislators: the authority to tax, the authority to legislate, the security of rights, the nature of law, the foundation of constitutional government in custom and contractarian theory, and the search for a constitutional settlement. Reid's distinctive analysis discusses the irreconcilable nature of this conflict--irreconcilable not because leaders in politics on both sides did not desire a solution, but because the dynamics of constitutional law impeded a solution that permitted the colonies to remain part of the dominions of George III
The ancient constitution and the origins of Anglo-American liberty by John Phillip Reid( Book )

7 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 379 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, English and American lawyers appealed to "the ancient constitution" as the cornerstone of liberty. According to this idea, constitutional law was not dictated by a monarch but based on the authority of custom, passed down unaltered from time immemorial. Legal historian John Phillip Reid demonstrates that this concept of an unchanging, ancient constitution furnished English common lawyers and parliamentarians an argument with which to combat royal prerogative power. At the same time, it provided American revolutionaries with legal arguments for rejecting the British parliament's effort to impose arbitrary rule upon the colonies."--Jacket
Rule of law : the jurisprudence of liberty in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by John Phillip Reid( Book )

5 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 347 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"While the rule of law's English roots can be found in the Middle Ages, its governing doctrine rose to power during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. John Phillip Reid traces the concept's progress through a series of landmark events in Great Britain and North America: the trial of Charles I, the creation of the Mayflower Compact, the demand for a codification of the laws in John Winthrop's Massachusetts Bay Colony, and an attempt to harness the Puritan Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell to the rule of law by crowning him king. The American Revolution, the culmination of two centuries of political foment, marked the greater victory of rule of law."
An American judge : Marmaduke Dent of West Virginia by John Phillip Reid( Book )

2 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 312 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contested empire : Peter Skene Ogden and the Snake River expeditions by John Phillip Reid( Book )

5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 300 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Do law and legal procedures exist only so long as there is an official authority to enforce them? Or do we have an unspoken sense of law and ethics?" "To answer these questions, John Phillip Reid's Contested Empire explores the implicit notions of law shared by American and British fur traders in the Snake River country of Idaho and surrounding areas in the early nineteenth century. Both the United States and Great Britain had claimed this region, and passions were intense. Focusing mainly on Canadian explorer and trader Peter Skene Ogden, Reid finds that both sides largely avoided violence and other difficulties because they held the same definitions of property, contract, conversion, and possession." "In 1824, the Hudson's Bay Company directed Ogden to decimate the fur-bearing animal population of the Snake River country, thus making the region a "fur desert." With this mandate, Great Britain hoped to neutralize any interest American furtrappers could have in the area. Such a mandate set British and American fur men on a collision course, but Ogden and his American counter-parts implicity followed a kind of law and procedure and observed a mutual sense of property and rights even as the two sides vied for control of the fur trade." "Failing to take legal culture into consideration, some previous accounts have depicted these conflicts as mere episodes of lawless frontier violence. Reid expands our understanding of the West by considering the unspoken sense of law that existed, despite the lack of any formalized authorities, in what has otherwise been considered a "lawless" time."--Jacket
Policing the elephant : crime, punishment, and social behavior on the Overland Trail by John Phillip Reid( Book )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 297 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this volume John Reid examines criminal activity and its consequences among travelers on the Overland Trail in the early nineteenth century. Professor Reid consulted hundreds of primary sources in several repositories to discover how justice was meted out - without police, prosecuting attorneys, or constituted courts. The book is a companion to Law for the Elephant: Property and Social Behavior on the Overland Trail (San Marino: 1980, 1997)
Controlling the law : legal politics in early national New Hampshire by John Phillip Reid( Book )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 252 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A bride for the Tsar : bride-shows and marriage politics in early modern Russia by John Phillip Reid( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.42 (from 0.06 for Constituti ... to 1.00 for Papers of ...)

The concept of liberty in the age of the American Revolution
Alternative Names
Reid, John P.

Reid, John P. 1930-

Reid, John Phillip 1930-

Languages
English (173)

Covers
The concept of liberty in the age of the American RevolutionLaw for the elephant : property and social behavior on the Overland TrailConstitutional history of the American RevolutionConstitutional history of the American RevolutionThe ancient constitution and the origins of Anglo-American libertyRule of law : the jurisprudence of liberty in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuriesContested empire : Peter Skene Ogden and the Snake River expeditionsPolicing the elephant : crime, punishment, and social behavior on the Overland TrailControlling the law : legal politics in early national New Hampshire