WorldCat Identities

Smith, Marcia S.

Overview
Works: 151 works in 643 publications in 1 language and 11,355 library holdings
Genres: Biography  Portraits  History  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author
Classifications: TL789.8.U5, 621.3804230999
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Marcia S Smith
Space activities of the United States, Soviet Union, and other launching countries/organizations : 1957-1990 : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

16 editions published between 1982 and 1991 in English and held by 543 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. space programs by Marcia S Smith( Book )

38 editions published between 1992 and 2013 in English and held by 352 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 109th Congress is addressing a broad range of civilian, military, and commercial space issues. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducts the most visible space activities. For FY2005, NASA received a total of $16.2 billion. The FY2006 request is $16.46 billion. The appropriate role of the government in facilitating commercial space businesses is an ongoing debate. For many years, the focus has been on space launch services, but commercial remote sensing satellites also pose complex questions. President Bush signed a new commercial remote sensing policy in 2003, and a new space launch policy in 2004, that try to strike a balance between facilitating commercial activities while ensuring the U.S. government has needed data and services. Congressional Research Service - The Library of Congress International cooperation and competition in space are affected by the world economic situation and the post-Cold War political climate. President Clinton's 1993 decision to merge NASA's space station program with Russia's is symbolic of the dramatic changes, and the risks
Space launch vehicles : government activities, commercial competition, and satellite exports by Marcia S Smith( Book )

34 editions published between 1999 and 2006 in English and held by 347 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Launching satellites into orbit, once the exclusive domain of the U.S. and Soviet governments, today is an industry in which companies in the United States, Europe, China, Russia, Ukraine, Japan, and India compete. In the United States, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) owns and launches its space shuttle. Private sector companies provide launch services for other NASA launches and most Department of Defense (DOD) launches. Commercial customers purchase launch services from the U.S. companies or their competitors. Since the early 1980s, Congress and successive Administrations have taken actions, including passing several laws, to facilitate the U.S. commercial space launch services business. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulates the industry. Forecasts in the 1990s suggesting significant increases in launch demand sparked plans to develop new launch vehicles. NASA and DOD created government-industry partnerships to develop new reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) and "evolved" expendable launch vehicles (EELVs), respectively. (The space shuttle is the only RLV today. All other launch vehicles are "expendable"--They can only be used once). Several U.S. private sector companies began developing their own launch vehicles. Projections for launch services demand declined dramatically beginning in 1999, however. NASA's efforts to develop a new RLV to replace the shuttle faltered. DOD's new EELVs (Atlas V and Delta IV) began service, but, with reduced demand, the companies that build them (Lockheed Martin and Boeing) want more DOD funding to defray their costs. In 2005, the two companies announced they would merge their EELV launch services for U.S. government customers. The joint venture, if approved by regulatory authorities, would be named the United Launch Alliance. Commercial launch services would not be affected. Congress is debating the future of the space shuttle, which returned to flight in July 2005 after a two and one-half year hiatus following the 2003 Columbia tragedy. President Bush has directed NASA to terminate the shuttle in 2010, but some want it to continue until a replacement is available. NASA is assessing what new vehicles it needs to implement the President's "Moon/Mars" program. One option is a "shuttle-derived" launch vehicle. In October 2004, Burt Rutan's SpaceShipOne suborbital spacecraft won the $10 million Ansari X-prize. Some believe this heralds an era of comparatively affordable space tourism. Congress passed a law in 2004 (P.L. 108-492) to establish a regulatory environment for space tourism. Concerns that China benefitted militarily from knowledge gained through commercial satellite launches in the 1990s led to changes in U.S. satellite export policy. The changes, especially returning control over such exports to the State Department from the Commerce Department, remain controversial because of what some claim is a negative impact on U.S. satellite manufacturing companies whose clients may choose European suppliers to avoid the U.S. export control regulations
Space stations by Marcia S Smith( Book )

34 editions published between 1995 and 2006 in English and held by 319 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Congress continues to debate NASA's International Space Station (ISS), a permanently occupied facility in Earth orbit where astronauts live and conduct research. Congress appropriated approximately $35 billion for the program from FY1985-2005. The initial FY2006 ISS request was $2.180 billion: $1.857 billion for construction and operations and $324 million for research to be conducted by ISS crews. In a July budget amendment, NASA transferred $168 million for ISS Crew/Cargo Services to another part of the NASA budget and reduced the ISS request commensurately. The final version of the FY2006 appropriations bill that includes NASA (H.R. 2862) cuts $80 million from the originally submitted budget, and NASA now plans to spend $306 million, instead of $324 million, on ISS research in FY2006. The space station is being assembled in Earth orbit. ISS segments, crews, and cargo are taken into orbit by Russian or U.S. spacecraft. ISS has been permanently occupied by successive "Expedition" crews rotating on 4-6 month shifts since November 2000. "Expedition 12" is now aboard. Cost growth and schedule delays have characterized the program since its inception. The grounding of the space shuttle fleet after the 2003 Columbia tragedy and the July 2005 Discovery "Return to Flight" mission is further affecting schedule, operations, and cost. Most of the remaining ISS segments are designed to be launched by the shuttle and construction therefore is suspended. President Bush's January 2004 "Vision for Space Exploration" also is affecting the ISS program. He directed that the shuttle program be terminated in 2010, and changed the focus of ISS-based research to only that which supports his to only that which supports his "Moon/Mars" Vision instead of the broadlybased program that was planned. Canada, Japan, and several European countries became partners with NASA in building the space station in 1988; Russia joined in 1993. Except for money paid to Russia, there is no exchange of funds among the partners. Europe, Canada, and Japan collectively expect to spend about $11 billion of their own money. A reliable figure for Russian expenditures is not available. In 1993, when the current space station design was adopted, NASA said it would cost $17.4 billion for construction (not including launch or other costs). That estimate grew to $24.1-$26.4 billion, leading Congress to legislate spending caps on part of the program in 2000. The estimate then grew by almost another $5 billion, leading NASA (at White House direction) to cancel or indefinitely defer some hardware to stay within the cap. NASA exceeded the cap in FY2005, however. Controversial since the program began in 1984, the space station has been repeatedly redesigned and rescheduled, often for costgrowth reasons. Congress has been concerned about the space station for that and other reasons. Twenty-two attempts to terminate the program in NASA funding bills were defeated, however (3 in the 106th Congress, 4 in the 105th Congress, 5 in the 104th, 5 in the 103rd, and 5 in the 102nd). Three other attempts in broader legislation in the 103rd Congress also failed. Current congressional debate focuses on the impact of space shuttle-related delays, and the future of ISS in light of President Bush's new exploration initiative
Possibility of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe : report by Library of Congress( Book )

5 editions published between 1977 and 2001 in English and held by 310 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Astronauts and cosmonauts biographical and statistical data : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

5 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 267 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Space activities of the United States, Soviet Union, and other launching countries-organizations, 1957-1993 : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 267 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Space law and related documents : international space law documents, U.S. space law documents( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 228 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Space activities of the United States, Soviet Union, and other launching countries/organizations, 1957-1982 : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

4 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 203 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

United States civilian space programs, 1958-1978 : report( Book )

in English and held by 196 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Space activities of the United States, Soviet Union, and other launching countries/organizations, 1957-1983 : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

7 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

United States civilian space programs : an overview : report by Library of Congress( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Space activities of the United States, Soviet Union, and other launching countries : 1957-1986 : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

4 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Space activities of the United States, Soviet Union, and other launching countries : 1957-1987 : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

3 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Internet privacy : overview and pending legislation by Marcia S Smith( Book )

21 editions published between 2002 and 2005 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Internet privacy issues encompass concerns about the collection of personally identifiable information (PII) from visitors to government and commercial Web sites, as well as debate over law enforcement or employer monitoring of electronic mail and Web usage. The parallel debate over Web site information policies concerns whether industry self regulation or legislation is the best approach to protecting consumer privacy. This report provides a brief overview of Internet privacy issues and describes legislation that was considered by the 107th Congress, including the four bills that were enacted
Space activities of the United States, Soviet Union, and other launching countries/organizations, 1957-1984 : report by Marcia S Smith( Book )

5 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 180 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Junk e-mail" : an overview of issues and legislation concerning unsolicited commercial electronic mail ("spam") by Marcia S Smith( Book )

15 editions published between 1999 and 2003 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sharing the adventure with the public : the value and excitement of "grand questions" of space science and exploration : summary of a workshop by National Research Council (U.S.)( Book )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"On November 8-10, 2010, the National Research Council's Space Studies Board (SSB) held a public workshop on how NASA and its associated science and exploration communities communicate with the public about major NASA activities and programs. The concept and planning of the workshop developed over a period of two years. In conjunction with the SSB, the workshop planning committee identified five "Grand Questions" in space science and exploration around which the event was organized. As outlined in the summary, the workshop concluded with sessions on communicating space research and exploration to the public."--Publisher's description
 
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Possibility of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe : report
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English (207)

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