WorldCat Identities

United States Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District

Overview
Works: 1,697 works in 2,035 publications in 1 language and 10,514 library holdings
Genres: History  Guidebooks  Local history 
Roles: Funder, Originator
Classifications: TC423, 574
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about United States
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Most widely held works by United States
Annual nutrient loadings, primary productivity, and trophic state of Lake Koocanusa, Montana and British Columbia, 1972-80 by Paul F Woods( Book )

3 editions published between 1982 and 1984 in English and held by 259 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wetland plants of the Pacific Northwest( Book )

4 editions published between 1984 and 1992 in English and held by 232 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fifty-nine species of wetland plants are described and illustrated with color photographs. These wetland species occur in eelgrass beds, low salt/brackish marshes, high salt/brackish marshes, deep freshwater marshes, shallow freshwater marshes, wet meadows and swamps. Definitions and a general introduction to wetlands are also provided
Kutenai Indian subsistence and settlement patterns, northwest Montana by Allan H Smith( Book )

3 editions published between 1984 and 1986 in English and held by 139 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Indian history and knowledge of the lower Similkameen River--Palmer Lake area by Randy Bouchard( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 127 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Summary of results, Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Project, Washington( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document summarizes results of the Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Project, a salvage program carried out by the Office of Public Archaeology, University of Washington under contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District. Between July 1978 and August 1980, intensive excavations were conducted at eighteen prehistoric habitation sites on the floodplain and lower terraces of the Columbia River on the 45-mile stretch of river above Chief Joseph Dam. This reach of the river, the lower section of the Upper Columbia, lies between the arid, basaltic Columbia Plateau and the forested, granitic Okanogan Highlands and includes portions of the traditional territories of two Native American groups, the Sanpoil-Nespelem and Southern Okanogan. This report summarizes findings at a project-wide scale. General descriptive information about the regional assemblage is presented, and arguments are developed supporting inferences about the organization of local subsistence and settlement systems and changes in them through time. (Author)
Research design for the Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Project( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This document summarizes the research goals and strategy of intensive data recovery performed by the University of Washington Office of Public Archaeology at the Chief Joseph Dam Project in north-central Washington state, 1978-1985. ... The introductory chapter discusses the scientific and humanistic concerns which guide cultural resource management for the project and the specific objectives of this phase of data recovery. Background information on the environment, Native American inhabitants and previous archaeological work in the area is provided in three separate chapters. The remainder of the report emphasizes strategic and tactical decisions made in data collection and analysis. The method of site selection, the sampling designs used at individual sites, and the excavation techniques used are reported."--Leaf iii
Cultural resources reconnaissance of the Albeni Falls Project, northern Idaho by Christian J Miss( Book )

3 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeological investigations at sites 45-OK-287 and 45-OK-288, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Christian J Miss( Book )

4 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Systematic random sampling disclosed six prehistoric components, the first data prior to 4800 BP, with little evidence of Native American use after about 400 B.P. Throughout its use, the site appears to have functioned primarily as a base camp for hunting deer, antelope and mountain sheep. Site is located on a narrow terrace at the foot of a steep slope on the right bank of Rufus Woods Lake (Columbia River) 110 mi. upstream from River Mile 568. (Author)
Archaeological investigations at Site 45-DO-211, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeological investigations at sites 45-DO-242 and 45-DO-243, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse( Book )

4 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sites 45-DO-242 and 45-DO-243 are on the south bank of the Columbia River (RM 579), on either side of a steep draw draining a massive escarpment of colluvial terraces. Located in the Upper Sonoran life zone, they lay on a narrow alluvial fan about 2 m above the river prior to dam construction. The University of Washington excavated 174 sq m at 45-DO-242 and 85 sq m at 45-DO-243 in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic unaligned random sampling with 1 x 1-m excavation units with 1 x 2 and 2 x 2-m cells disclosed at least four cultural occupations at both sites. Nine radiocarbon dates from 45-DO-242 place cultural activity from about 3500-200 B.P.A single radiocarbon date from 45-DO-243 dates the most recent occupation after about 1500 B.P. Projectile points from both sites indicate occupations prior to 4000 B.P. Most cultural activity, including a probable winter village at 45-DO-242, occured in the Hudnut Phase (ca. 4000-2000 B.P.). Site assemblages are remarkably consistent, with diagnostic artifacts and tool types reflecting an emphasis on hunting, partially supplemented by gathering. The presence of a village site, dated at 3500 B.P. and located between earlier and later occupations characterized as hunting and gathering camps, documents shifting patterns of site use characteristic of at least the last 5,000 years in the Rufus Woods Lake project area
Archaeological investigations at site 45-DO-214, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Christian J Miss( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Site 45-DO-214 is on the south bank of the Columbia River (River Mile 588) near the Okanogan Highland-Columbia Plateau boundary, in an Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 192.6 m3 of site volume in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic, aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x 0.1 meter collection units in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed three prehistoric components contained in slope derived colluvial deposits and later overbank deposits. Projectile point styles of the earliest component indicate a Hudnut Phase association from 4,000 to 2,000 years ago. The river then cut away much of the terrace resulting in a hiatus in the archaeological record of about 800 years. This hiatus was followed by a series of occupations dating from 1,200 to 1,000 years ago enclosed in rapidly deposited overbank sediments. The final component is relatively dated by projectile point styles to the last 1,000 years. The second and third components represent the Coyote Creek Phase. While there is no change in technological processes or kinds of functional traces through time, there is variation in economic emphasis and intensity of site use
Archaeological investigations at site 45-DO-282, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Site 45-DO-282 is on the south bank of the Columbia River (River Mile 556) near the Okanogan Highland - Columbia Plateau boundary in an Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 186.1 cu m of site volume in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigtion program associated with adding 10 ft to the pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x 0.2-m units of record in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed one historic and four prehistoric occupations on an alluvial fan built onto an early river terrace, interbedded with later overbank and aeolian sediments. There are no radiocarbon dates, but projectile points indicate the earliest occupation is early to mid-Kartar Phase. The second, more intensive occupation probably occurred 6,000 to 5,000 years ago. The third and fourth occupations in the late Kartar Phase took place about 5,000 to 4,000 years ago. Occupation character shows no change in 2,500 years; all occupations are lithic scatters, with blade and microblade technology and chipping stations. Shelters, earth ovens, hearths, and bone concentrations are absent. Environmental stability is indicated by soil formation after 4,000 years ago. The historic occupation is an early 20th century homestead. (Author)
Archaeological investigations at site 45-OK-11 Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Site 45-OK-11 is on the north bank of the Columbia River in Okanogan County, between River Mile 576 and 577. The University of Washington excavated 1020 cu m of site volume from 1978-1980 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating pool level behind Chief Joeph Dam. Systematic aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x .01 m units of record in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed two major cultural components representing the Hudnut and Kartar Phases
Archaeological inventory and testing of prehistoric habitation sites, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Jerry V Jermann( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

: Archaeological inventory and evaluation of cultural resources potentially threatened by a proposed 10-foot pool raise behind Chief Joseph Dam, north-central Washington was made. Pedestrian reconnaissance of areas not previously subject to resource inventory identified 27 prehistoric sites, bringing the total number of recorded sites in the area to 279. Test excavations were completed at 79 prehistoric habitation sites in order to characterize formal, temporal, and spatial variability in sufficient detail to provide for follow-on management planning. Artifacts and contextual samples recovered from nearly 600 cubic meters of soil matrix in 543 test units demonstrate that the project area was occupied by Native American groups continuously for at least the last 6,000 years, and perhaps longer. Considerable temporal and geographic variation occurs in the cultural assemblage, variability reflecting regional settlement and subsistence patterns. The cumulative database resulting from survey-level investigations includes the first comprehensive large-scale cultural resources inventory in the region, the first series of controlled radiocarbon age determinations from cultural contexts along the reservoir, and the largest assemblage of site samples from the upper Columbia River region. These data provide invaluable research materials for future investigators interested in the evolution of prehistoric cultural adaptations in the Columbia Plateau
Archaeological investigations at site 45-DO-273, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Manfred E. W Jaehnig( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Site 45-DO-273 is on the south bank of the Columbia River (River Mile 561), near the Okanogan Highland-Columbia Plateau boundary, in an Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 158.6 cubic meters in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program for a 10-foot pool raise at the Chief Joseph Dam Project. Systematic aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x 0.1-meter units of record in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-meter cells disclosed three prehistoric occuptions on an alluvial fan built onto an early point bar deposit, interbedded with overbank sediments. The two carbon dates obtained are unreliable, several serrated lanceolate projectile points suggest that the first occupation occurred more than 5,500 years ago. The second, more intensive occupation probably occurred about 4,500 years ago. Both of these early occupations fall within the Kartar Phase. The third occupation, in the Coyote Creek Phase, probably took place between 1,500 and 1,000 years ago. The occupations show little change in more than 4,500 years; all are lithic and bone concentrations with microblade technology and lithic stations. The earlier two occupations yielded mussel shell fragments, which are lacking in the later two. No earth ovens or hearths were found. (Author)
Archaeological investigations at site 45-OK-258, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Manfred E. W Jaehnig( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Site 45-OK-258 is on the north bank of the Columbia River about 125 meters upstream from River Mile 576. Vegetation is characteristic of the Upper Sonoran life zone. We excavated 4,882.9 cubic meters of site volume in 1978 and 1979 as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 feet to the operating pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. A two-stage sampling design, incorporating random and nonrandom 1 x 1 x .01 meter units of record, disclosed multiple episodes of prehistoric occupation spanning a period from about 3600 to about 100 years ago. Two major occupational components associated with 6 stratigraphically defined analytic zones are evident. The first component dates roughly between 3600 and 2400 years ago, and has 4 associated housepits. Assemblages associated with both the house floors and external surfaces suggest the site was a central base, a probable winter village, associated with the Hudnut Phase (4000 to 2000 B.P.). Faunal assemblages of this component contain a high percentage of carnivores; strong emphasis on consumption of fish is suggested by the high frequency of burned and broken salmonid vertebrae. The second component is dated from about 800 years ago to the modern era, and associated with the Coyote Creek Phase (2000 to 150 B.P.). It contains at least one housepit, and several occupation surfaces. It appears to represent a central base, but may have changed useages to a field camp within the occupation span. Horse remains indicate a protohistoric association late in the occupation. Archaeobotanical analysis is presented for both components, documenting the earliest known occurrence of a cache of the seeds of Chenopodium femontii (about 2800 B.P.) in the Plateau
Archaeological investigations at Site 45-DO-326, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Site 45-DO-326 is a rockshelter on the south bank of the Columbia River about 100 m upstream from River Mile 559. Vegetation is characteristic of the Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 89 sq m (12.5%) of site volume in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. A systematic sample of 1 x 1-m units was laid out in the area outside of the rockshelter and an elongate block excavation was undertaken within the area of the basalt erratics. Four zones of cultural occupation were defined within a complex stratigraphic record about 1.5 m in depth. Radiocarbon dates and diagnostic projectile point types document at least 5,000 years of cultural activity spanning all three cultural phases defined for the Rufus Woods Lake project area. The rockshelter was maintained as a hunting base camp during the latter part of the Kartar Phase (ca. 5000-4000 B.P.)
Archaeological investigations at site 45-DO-285, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Christian J Miss( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Site 45-DO-285 is located at the north end of Buckley Bar, a landform in Rufus Woods Lake (Columbia River) at River Mile 587.5 near the Okanogan Highland-Columbia Plateau boundary. The site lies in an Upper Sonoran life zone. In 1979, the University of Washington excavated 137.2 cu m of site volume under contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic, aligned random sampling of 1 x 1 x 0.1-m collection units in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed four prehistoric components contained in point bar and later overbank deposits. The first two components are best characterized as Late Hudnut Phase. Projectile point styles and a single radiocarbon date indicate that these older compnents date between 3,000 and 2,000 years ago. The earliest cultural material is contained in point bar sands and gravels and overbandk deposits; the later material in overbank deposits. Projectile point styles from the assemblages are similar to those of the Quilomene Bar Phase. The two more recent components are assigned to the Coyote Creek Phase. They contain projectile points similar to those found in the Cayuse Phase on the Middle Columbia and are dated by these styles and two radiocarbon dates to a period from 2000 B.P. to the protohistoric. (Author)
Northwest passages : a history of the Seattle District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1896-1920 by William F Willingham( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stillaguamish River ecosystem restoration, Snohomish County, Washington : final feasibility report( )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.57 (from 0.38 for History of ... to 0.87 for Public not ...)

Alternative Names
Seattle District

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division. Seattle District

United States Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Seattle, Washington, District

Languages
English (76)