WorldCat Identities

United States Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District

Overview
Works: 1,681 works in 1,949 publications in 1 language and 9,606 library holdings
Genres: History  Guidebooks 
Roles: Funder, Originator
Classifications: TC423, 574
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about United States Publications about United States
Publications by United States Publications by United States
Most widely held works about United States
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Most widely held works by United States
Annual nutrient loadings, primary productivity, and trophic state of Lake Koocanusa, Montana and British Columbia, 1972-80 by Paul F Woods ( Book )
2 editions published between 1982 and 1984 in English and held by 265 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Wetland plants of the Pacific Northwest ( Book )
4 editions published between 1984 and 1992 in English and held by 235 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Kutenai Indian subsistence and settlement patterns, northwest Montana by Allan H Smith ( Book )
3 editions published between 1984 and 1986 in English and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Cultural resources reconnaissance of the Albeni Falls Project, northern Idaho by Christian J Miss ( Book )
4 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 133 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Archaeological investigations at site 45-DO-214, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Christian J Miss ( Book )
3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Site 45-DO-214 is on the south bank of the Columbia River (River Mile 588) near the Okanogan Highland-Columbia Plateau boundary, in an Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 192.6 m3 of site volume in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic, aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x 0.1 meter collection units in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed three prehistoric components contained in slope derived colluvial deposits and later overbank deposits. Projectile point styles of the earliest component indicate a Hudnut Phase association from 4,000 to 2,000 years ago. The river then cut away much of the terrace resulting in a hiatus in the archaeological record of about 800 years. This hiatus was followed by a series of occupations dating from 1,200 to 1,000 years ago enclosed in rapidly deposited overbank sediments. The final component is relatively dated by projectile point styles to the last 1,000 years. The second and third components represent the Coyote Creek Phase. While there is no change in technological processes or kinds of functional traces through time, there is variation in economic emphasis and intensity of site use
Archaeological investigations at site 45-OK-18, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Manfred E. W Jaehnig ( Book )
3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Site 45-OK-18 is on the north bank of the Columbia River (River Mile 561), near the Okanogan Highland-Columbia Plateau boundary, in an Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 166.13 sq m of site volume in 1978 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program for a 10-ft pool raise at the Chief Joseph Dam Project. Systematic aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x 0.1-m units of record in 1 x 2 x or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed three prehistoric occupation on a terrace built from Columbia River gravels covered by overbank and aeolian sediments. The two carbon dates obtained, the Mt. St. Helens P and Yn series tephra recovered, and the several lanceolate, shouldered lanceolate and large side-notced projectile points suggest that the three occupations occurred between 4000 and 3000 B.P., which places them in the Hudnut Phase. The site appears to have been abandoned after that time. The second of the three occupations was the most intense. A cache of stone beads is associated with the second occupation. Lethic and bone concentrations indicate that the site served as a base camp for hunting and gathering. A single firepit was found. (Author)
Indian history and knowledge of the lower Similkameen River--Palmer Lake area by Randy Bouchard ( Book )
3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The study area is along the Similkameen River, from its mouth just below the town of Oroville and upstream as far as the Canadian border, including the Palmer Lake area. In this report, the history of Indian land use along the lower Similkameen is examined, focusing on the approximately 50 Indian place names recorded in the study area. Information is provided both from interviews with contemporary Okanagan-Colville Indian consultants, and from the pertinent literature. The information contained in this report will be used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to establish an inventory of cultural resource sites which will assist in defining the history of human use of the study area. Contents: A Brief History of the Nicola-Similkameen Indians; The Okanagan Indians of the Similkameen and Okanogan Rivers; Native Food Resources, Lower Similkameen River-Palmer Lake Area; Native Knowledge of the Lower Similkameen River-Palmer Lake Area
Research design for the Chief Joseph Dam cultural resources project ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This document summarizes the research goals and strategy of Intensive data recovery performed by the University of Washington Office of Public Archaeology at the Chief Joseph Dam Project in north-central Washington state, 1978-1985. During the seven-year span of the project, the overall goals changed in response to changes in the theoretical interests of the discipline and in cultural resources management practices and concerns. The introductory chapter discusses the scientific and humanistic concerns which guide cultural resource management for the project and the specific objectives of this phase of data recovery. Background information on the environment, Native American inhabitants and previous archaeological work in the area is provided in three separate chapters. The remainder of the report emphasizes strategic and tactical decisions made in data collection and analysis. The method of site selection, the sampling designs used at individual sites, and the excavation techniques used are reported. The rationale and procedures for dividing sites into analytic cultural zones based on stratigraphic analysis and other chronological information is described. A brief description of the data management system is given. Separate chapters summarize the goals, special data collection techniques, and analytic methods used in analysis of artifacts, faunal remains, botanical remains, and features. (Author)
Archaeological investigations at Site 45-DO-211, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Site 45-DO-211 is on the south bank of the Columbia River about 340 m upstream from River Mile 589. Vegetation is characteristic of the Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 88 cu m (3.9 %) of site volume in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10-ft to the operating pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. A two-stage sampling design, incorporating random and non-random 1 x 1 x .01-m units of record, disclosed multiple episodes of prehistoric occupation spanning a period from ca. 5500-2700 B.P. and involving the construction of housepits as part of year-round activity. Four housepits were identified, with at least two of these evidently associated with a summer fish camp designed to take advantage of the seasonal runs of salmon. The others represent fall and winter occupations where economic emphasis was on the hunting of large ungulates. The documentation of a probable fishing camp with housepits in the Hudnut Phase (ca. 4000-2000 B.P.) at this site is unique in the Rufus Woods Lake project area, and suggests prehistoric economic systems over the last 3,000-4,000 years were generally similar to those described for the ethnohistoric period. The Columbia River was the focus of activity, with housepit settlements established at different points along the river. (Author)
Archaeological inventory and testing of prehistoric habitation sites, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Jerry V Jermann ( Book )
2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Archaeological inventory and evaluation of cultural resources potentially threatened by a proposed 10-foot pool raise behind Chief Joseph Dam, north-central Washington was made. Pedestrian reconnaissance of areas not previously subject to resource inventory identified 27 prehistoric sites, bringing the total number of recorded sites in the area to 279. Test excavations were completed at 79 prehistoric habitation sites in order to characterize formal, temporal, and spatial variability in sufficient detail to provide for follow-on management planning. Artifacts and contextual samples recovered from nearly 600 cubic meters of soil matrix in 543 test units demonstrate that the project area was occupied by Native American groups continuously for at least the last 6,000 years, and perhaps longer. Considerable temporal and geographic variation occurs in the cultural assemblage, variability reflecting regional settlement and subsistence patterns. The cumulative database resulting from survey-level investigations includes the first comprehensive large-scale cultural resources inventory in the region, the first series of controlled radiocarbon age determinations from cultural contexts along the reservoir, and the largest assemblage of site samples from the upper Columbia River region. These data provide invaluable research materials for future investigators interested in the evolution of prehistoric cultural adaptations in the Columbia Plateau
Archaeological investigations at sites 45-OK-287 and 45-OK-288, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Christian J Miss ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Systematic random sampling disclosed six prehistoric components, the first data prior to 4800 BP, with little evidence of Native American use after about 400 B.P. Throughout its use, the site appears to have functioned primarily as a base camp for hunting deer, antelope and mountain sheep. Site is located on a narrow terrace at the foot of a steep slope on the right bank of Rufus Woods Lake (Columbia River) 110 mi. upstream from River Mile 568. (Author)
Summary of results, Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Project, Washington ( Book )
2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This document summarizes results of the Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Project, a salvage program carried out by the Office of Public Archaeology, University of Washington under contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District. Between July 1978 and August 1980, intensive excavations were conducted at eighteen prehistoric habitation sites on the floodplain and lower terraces of the Columbia River on the 45-mile stretch of river above Chief Joseph Dam. This reach of the river, the lower section of the Upper Columbia, lies between the arid, basaltic Columbia Plateau and the forested, granitic Okanogan Highlands and includes portions of the traditional territories of two Native American groups, the Sanpoil-Nespelem and Southern Okanogan. This report summarizes findings at a project-wide scale. General descriptive information about the regional assemblage is presented, and arguments are developed supporting inferences about the organization of local subsistence and settlement systems and changes in them through time. (Author)
Archaeological investigations at 30 historic sites, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Bryn Thomas ( Book )
3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
On-site examination, mapping and photographing was supplemented by archival research, informant interviews and study of historical documents. Two sites, 45-OK-182H (Blackburn Homestead) and 45-DO-202H (Condon Ferry) required subsurface investigation. Of particular interest were buildings, recognizable concentrations of objects (such as refuse dumps), scatters and buried objects. When a Chinese coin was found at prehistoric site 45-DO-211, subsurface investigations were conducted in the historic component, designated 45-DO-210H. However, no definite evidence of Chinese influence was found. The 30 sites included five allotments, nine placer mines, 12 homesteads, three ferry crossings and a burial marker. Evidence indicates that the area was settled by homesteaders and miners in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The ferries and associated buildings that served the miners and homesteaders were installed during this same period. The last mine was abandoned during the 1950s and most homesteads by shortly after World War I. Improved roads and bridges made the ferries obsolete by 1930. Remnants of homesteads, mines, allotments and ferry landings suggest that, in general, these enterprises were modest
Archaeological investigations at sites 45-DO-242 and 45-DO-243, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse ( Book )
4 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Sites 45-DO-242 and 45-DO-243 are on the south bank of the Columbia River (RM 579), on either side of a steep draw draining a massive escarpment of colluvial terraces. Located in the Upper Sonoran life zone, they lay on a narrow alluvial fan about 2 m above the river prior to dam construction. The University of Washington excavated 174 sq m at 45-DO-242 and 85 sq m at 45-DO-243 in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic unaligned random sampling with 1 x 1-m excavation units with 1 x 2 and 2 x 2-m cells disclosed at least four cultural occupations at both sites. Nine radiocarbon dates from 45-DO-242 place cultural activity from about 3500-200 B.P.A single radiocarbon date from 45-DO-243 dates the most recent occupation after about 1500 B.P. Projectile points from both sites indicate occupations prior to 4000 B.P. Most cultural activity, including a probable winter village at 45-DO-242, occured in the Hudnut Phase (ca. 4000-2000 B.P.). Site assemblages are remarkably consistent, with diagnostic artifacts and tool types reflecting an emphasis on hunting, partially supplemented by gathering. The presence of a village site, dated at 3500 B.P. and located between earlier and later occupations characterized as hunting and gathering camps, documents shifting patterns of site use characteristic of at least the last 5,000 years in the Rufus Woods Lake project area
Archaeological investigations at sites 45-OK-250 and 45-OK-4, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Christian J Miss ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Site 45-OK-250 and 45-OK-4 are located on a narrow terrace at the foot of a steep slope on the right bank of Columbia River 70 to 350 m upstream from River Mile 578. The site lies in an Upper Sonoran life zone. In 1979 and 1980 the University of Washington excavated 347 cu m of matrix volume for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic random sampling using 1 x 1 x 0.1-m collection units in 1 x 1, 1 x 2, or 2 x 2 m cells disclosed three prehistoric occupations in overbank, colluvial and aeolian deposits. The first occupation is represented by diffuse cultural material and a few structured features found in overbank sand and silt deposits and in association with basal river gravel and alluvial fan deposits. The zone is dated by a single radiocarbon date, the age of the overlying zone and a small number of projectile points to pre-3500 B.P. It represents a mix of Hudnut and Kartar Phase elements. The second zone, dated from 3500 to 2000 B.P., by 17 radiocarbon dates, is contained in slope wash sediments with increasing aeolian modification toward the surface and locally variable colluvial contributions. It contains seven structures, six of them housepits
Archaeological investigations at site 45-DO-285, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Christian J Miss ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Site 45-DO-285 is located at the north end of Buckley Bar, a landform in Rufus Woods Lake (Columbia River) at River Mile 587.5 near the Okanogan Highland-Columbia Plateau boundary. The site lies in an Upper Sonoran life zone. In 1979, the University of Washington excavated 137.2 cu m of site volume under contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic, aligned random sampling of 1 x 1 x 0.1-m collection units in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed four prehistoric components contained in point bar and later overbank deposits. The first two components are best characterized as Late Hudnut Phase. Projectile point styles and a single radiocarbon date indicate that these older compnents date between 3,000 and 2,000 years ago. The earliest cultural material is contained in point bar sands and gravels and overbandk deposits; the later material in overbank deposits. Projectile point styles from the assemblages are similar to those of the Quilomene Bar Phase. The two more recent components are assigned to the Coyote Creek Phase. They contain projectile points similar to those found in the Cayuse Phase on the Middle Columbia and are dated by these styles and two radiocarbon dates to a period from 2000 B.P. to the protohistoric. (Author)
Archaeological investigations at site 45-DO-282, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Site 45-DO-282 is on the south bank of the Columbia River (River Mile 556) near the Okanogan Highland - Columbia Plateau boundary in an Upper Sonoran life zone. The University of Washington excavated 186.1 cu m of site volume in 1979 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigtion program associated with adding 10 ft to the pool level behind Chief Joseph Dam. Systematic aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x 0.2-m units of record in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed one historic and four prehistoric occupations on an alluvial fan built onto an early river terrace, interbedded with later overbank and aeolian sediments. There are no radiocarbon dates, but projectile points indicate the earliest occupation is early to mid-Kartar Phase. The second, more intensive occupation probably occurred 6,000 to 5,000 years ago. The third and fourth occupations in the late Kartar Phase took place about 5,000 to 4,000 years ago. Occupation character shows no change in 2,500 years; all occupations are lithic scatters, with blade and microblade technology and chipping stations. Shelters, earth ovens, hearths, and bone concentrations are absent. Environmental stability is indicated by soil formation after 4,000 years ago. The historic occupation is an early 20th century homestead. (Author)
Archaeological investigations at site 45-OK-11 Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Ernest S Lohse ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Site 45-OK-11 is on the north bank of the Columbia River in Okanogan County, between River Mile 576 and 577. The University of Washington excavated 1020 cu m of site volume from 1978-1980 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, as part of a mitigation program associated with adding 10 ft to the operating pool level behind Chief Joeph Dam. Systematic aligned random sampling with 1 x 1 x .01 m units of record in 1 x 2 or 2 x 2-m cells disclosed two major cultural components representing the Hudnut and Kartar Phases
Dimensions of site structure : the archaeological record from two sites in Okanogan County, Washington by James C Chatters ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
During 1982 and 1983, Central Washington Archaeological Survey conducted extensive text excavations at prehistoric archaeological sites 450K196 and 450K197, north central Washington. Funding was provided by the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, Seattle District as a part of the Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Program. The study was conducted to assess the sites' cultural significance and to determine whether sediments at 450K197 could provide data on the periodicity of flooding on the Columbia River during the past two millenia. Occupations, which rest on the surfaces of individual flood deposits, represent short-term hunting camps, spring base camps, a warriors' bivouac and a modern berry drying encampment. All occupations are little disturbed and contain well-preserved biotic remains and discrete artifact patterning. Mitigation is recommended. An appendix is included describing flood periodicity on the Columbia River, analyzed by comparing actual sedimentation frequencies at 450K197 with hypothetical models of sedimentation to determine whether flood frequencies have varied during the last 1900 years
Archaeological investigations at sites 45-OK-2 and 45-OK-2A, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington by Sarah K Campbell ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 116 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Sites 45-OK-2 and 45-OK-2A are on the floodplain of the Columbia River (between River Mile 580-581) near the mouth of the Nespelem River in an upper Sonoran life zone. Excavations were conducted at 45-OK-2A in 1979 and 45-OK-2 in 1979 and 1980 by the University of Washington under contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District as part of a mitigation program for a 10-foot pool raise at the Chief Joseph Dam Project. Total volumes of 90.6 cubic meters at 45-0K-2A and 372.9 cubic meters at 45-0K-2 were removed in 1 x 1 x 0.1-meter units of record in 1 x 2-m or 2 x 2-m sample units. Random sample units, 64 at 45-0K-2 and 29 at 45-0K-2A were selected using a stratified random sampling design with a higher sampling intensity in areas with visible surface depressions. An additional 81 nonrandom units were excavated at 45-OK-2. Four occupations are evident in the alluvial sediments of the terrace in the vicinity of 45-0K-2
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.79 (from 0.00 for EnginEars ... to 1.00 for Maintenanc ...)
Alternative Names
United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division. Seattle District
United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Seattle, Washington, District
Languages
English (74)